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U2OS

RRID:CVCL_0042

Organism

Homo sapiens

Comments

Part of: Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) project. Part of: COSMIC cell lines project. Part of: ENCODE project common cell types; tier 3. Part of: MD Anderson Cell Lines Project. Doubling time: ~25-30 hours (DSMZ). HLA typing: A*32:01,02:01; B*44:02,44:02; C*05:01,07:04; DQB1*05:03,03:04; DRB1*04:05,04:05 (PubMed=25960936). Microsatellite instability: Stable (MSS) (Sanger). Sequence variation: Has no TP53 mutation (PubMed=19787792). Omics: Cell surface proteome. Omics: Deep antibody staining analysis. Omics: Deep exome analysis. Omics: Deep proteome analysis. Omics: Deep RNAseq analysis. Omics: DNA methylation analysis. Omics: Metabolome analysis. Omics: Protein expression by reverse-phase protein arrays. Omics: SNP array analysis. Omics: Transcriptome analysis. Omics: Virome analysis using proteomics. Genome ancestry: African=2.75%; Native American=0%; East Asian, North=5.19%; East Asian, South=0%; South Asian=0%; European, North=60.98%; European, South=31.08% (PubMed=30894373). Misspelling: U-205; Occasionally. Misspelling: U205; Occasionally. DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 06-09-19; Version: 32

Proper Citation

DSMZ Cat# ACC-785, RRID:CVCL_0042

Category

Cancer cell line DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 06-09-19; Version: 32

Sex

DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 06-09-19; Version: 32

Synonyms

U-2 OS, U-2OS, U-2-OS, U2-OS, U20-S, U20S, 2T DT Created: 04-04-12, Last updated: 06-09-19, Version: 32

Vendor

DSMZ

Cat Num

ACC-785

Cross References

BTO; BTO:0001938 CLO; CLO_0001272 CLO; CLO_0009454 EFO; EFO_0002869 MCCL; MCC:0000468 CLDB; cl53 CLDB; cl4579 CLDB; cl4580 CLDB; cl4581 CLDB; cl7217 4DN; 4DNSR3V9ST6H ArrayExpress; E-MTAB-2706 ArrayExpress; E-MTAB-2770 ArrayExpress; E-MTAB-3610 ATCC; HTB-96 BCRC; 60187 BCRJ; 0304 BioSample; SAMN03472549 BioSample; SAMN03472766 BioSample; SAMN10987914 CCLE; U2OS_BONE CCRID; 3111C0001CCC000028 CCRID; 3131C0001000700088 CCRID; 3142C0001000000955 Cell_Model_Passport; SIDM01191 ChEMBL-Cells; CHEMBL3307757 ChEMBL-Targets; CHEMBL615023 CLS; 300364/p489_U-2_OS Cosmic; 687934 Cosmic; 755312 Cosmic; 909776 Cosmic; 931038 Cosmic; 931909 Cosmic; 1044081 Cosmic; 1044268 Cosmic; 1066238 Cosmic; 1074397 Cosmic; 1078392 Cosmic; 1082493 Cosmic; 1097758 Cosmic; 1529905 Cosmic; 1733128 Cosmic; 2009542 Cosmic; 2301583 Cosmic; 2440477 Cosmic-CLP; 909776 DepMap; ACH-000364 DSMZ; ACC-785 ECACC; 92022711 ENCODE; ENCBS200HLU ENCODE; ENCBS266AAA ENCODE; ENCBS953RZO GDSC; 909776 GEO; GSE54820 GEO; GSM170250 GEO; GSM185160 GEO; GSM185161 GEO; GSM287989 GEO; GSM287990 GEO; GSM320831 GEO; GSM827583 GEO; GSM879223 GEO; GSM887722 GEO; GSM888816 GEO; GSM1231597 GEO; GSM1231598 GEO; GSM1231599 GEO; GSM1231600 GEO; GSM1231601 GEO; GSM1231602 GEO; GSM1231603 GEO; GSM1231604 GEO; GSM1231605 GEO; GSM1231606 GEO; GSM1231607 GEO; GSM1231608 GEO; GSM1231609 GEO; GSM1231610 GEO; GSM1356565 GEO; GSM1356566 GEO; GSM1356567 GEO; GSM1356568 GEO; GSM1356569 GEO; GSM1356570 GEO; GSM1356571 GEO; GSM1356572 GEO; GSM1356573 GEO; GSM1356574 GEO; GSM1356575 GEO; GSM1356576 GEO; GSM1356577 GEO; GSM1356578 GEO; GSM1356579 GEO; GSM1356580 GEO; GSM1356581 GEO; GSM1356582 GEO; GSM1356583 GEO; GSM1356584 GEO; GSM1356585 GEO; GSM1356586 GEO; GSM1356587 GEO; GSM1670557 GEO; GSM1676324 GEO; GSM1701657 IARC_TP53; 27710 ICLC; HTL11001 KCB; KCB 200962YJ KCLB; 30096 LiGeA; CCLE_160 LINCS_LDP; LCL-1431 Lonza; 676 MetaboLights; MTBLS292 PharmacoDB; U2OS_1619_2019 PRIDE; PRD000118 PRIDE; PXD000262 PRIDE; PXD000157 PRIDE; PXD000589 PRIDE; PXD000953 PRIDE; PXD000954 PRIDE; PXD001220 PRIDE; PXD002073 PRIDE; PXD002117 PRIDE; PXD002395 PRIDE; PXD003754 PRIDE; PXD009668 TOKU-E; 3379 Wikidata; Q28473037 DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 06-09-19; Version: 32

Hierarchy

DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 06-09-19; Version: 32

Originate from Same Individual

DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 06-09-19; Version: 32

Publications that use this research resource

Histone Methylation by SETD1A Protects Nascent DNA through the Nucleosome Chaperone Activity of FANCD2.

  • Higgs MR
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Jul 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Components of the Fanconi anemia and homologous recombination pathways play a vital role in protecting newly replicated DNA from uncontrolled nucleolytic degradation, safeguarding genome stability. Here we report that histone methylation by the lysine methyltransferase SETD1A is crucial for protecting stalled replication forks from deleterious resection. Depletion of SETD1A sensitizes cells to replication stress and leads to uncontrolled DNA2-dependent resection of damaged replication forks. The ability of SETD1A to prevent degradation of these structures is mediated by its ability to catalyze methylation on Lys4 of histone H3 (H3K4) at replication forks, which enhances FANCD2-dependent histone chaperone activity. Suppressing H3K4 methylation or expression of a chaperone-defective FANCD2 mutant leads to loss of RAD51 nucleofilament stability and severe nucleolytic degradation of replication forks. Our work identifies epigenetic modification and histone mobility as critical regulatory mechanisms in maintaining genome stability by restraining nucleases from irreparably damaging stalled replication forks.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - RR024574(United States)

Focal Adhesions Undergo Longitudinal Splitting into Fixed-Width Units.

  • Young LE
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2018 Jul 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Focal adhesions (FAs) and stress fibers (SFs) act in concert during cell motility and in response to the extracellular environment. Although the structures of mature FAs and SFs are well studied, less is known about how they assemble and mature de novo during initial cell spreading. In this study using live-cell Airyscan microscopy, we find that FAs undergo "splitting" during their assembly, in which the FA divides along its longitudinal axis. Before splitting, FAs initially appear as assemblies of multiple linear units (FAUs) of 0.3-μm width. Splitting occurs between FAUs, resulting in mature FAs of either a single FAU or of a small number of FAUs that remain attached at their distal tips. Variations in splitting occur based on cell type and extracellular matrix. Depletion of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) results in reduced splitting. FA-associated tension increases progressively during splitting. Early in cell spreading, ventral SFs are detected first, with other SF sub-types (transverse arcs and dorsal SFs) being detected later. Our findings suggest that the fundamental unit of FAs is the fixed-width FAU, and that dynamic interactions between FAUs control adhesion morphology.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - HG005715(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - P20 GM113132()

PARP1-dependent recruitment of the FBXL10-RNF68-RNF2 ubiquitin ligase to sites of DNA damage controls H2A.Z loading.

  • Rona G
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jul 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

The mammalian FBXL10-RNF68-RNF2 ubiquitin ligase complex (FRRUC) mono-ubiquitylates H2A at Lys119 to repress transcription in unstressed cells. We found that the FRRUC is rapidly and transiently recruited to sites of DNA damage in a PARP1- and TIMELESS-dependent manner to promote mono-ubiquitylation of H2A at Lys119, a local decrease of H2A levels, and an increase of H2A.Z incorporation. Both the FRRUC and H2A.Z promote transcriptional repression, double strand break signaling, and homologous recombination repair (HRR). All these events require both the presence and activity of the FRRUC. Moreover, the FRRUC and its activity are required for the proper recruitment of BMI1-RNF2 and MEL18-RNF2, two other ubiquitin ligases that mono-ubiquitylate Lys119 in H2A upon genotoxic stress. Notably, whereas H2A.Z is not required for H2A mono-ubiquitylation, impairment of the latter results in the inhibition of H2A.Z incorporation. We propose that the recruitment of the FRRUC represents an early and critical regulatory step in HRR.

Funding information:
  • American Cancer Society - ACS 130304-RSG-16-241-01-DMC()
  • National Institutes of Health - R01- GM057691()
  • National Institutes of Health - R01-CA076584()
  • National Institutes of Health - R01-GM057587()
  • National Institutes of Health - R21-CA187612()
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - ES07784(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM057587()
  • The Rosztoczy Foundation - Fellowship()

Co-polymers of Actin and Tropomyosin Account for a Major Fraction of the Human Actin Cytoskeleton.

  • Meiring JCM
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2018 Jun 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Tropomyosin proteins form stable coiled-coil dimers that polymerize along the α-helical groove of actin filaments [1]. The actin cytoskeleton consists of both co-polymers of actin and tropomyosin and polymers of tropomyosin-free actin [2]. The fundamental distinction between these two types of filaments is that tropomyosin determines the functional capability of actin filaments in an isoform-dependent manner [3-9]. However, it is unknown what portion of actin filaments are associated with tropomyosin. To address this deficit, we have measured the relative distribution between these two filament populations by quantifying tropomyosin and actin levels in a variety of human cell types, including bone (U2OS); breast epithelial (MCF-10A); transformed breast epithelial (MCF-7); and primary (BJpar), immortalized (BJeH), and Ras-transformed (BJeLR) BJ fibroblasts [10]. Our measurements of tropomyosin and actin predict the saturation of the actin cytoskeleton, implying that tropomyosin binding must be inhibited in order to generate tropomyosin-free actin filaments. We find the majority of actin filaments to be associated with tropomyosin in four of the six cell lines tested and the portion of actin filaments associated with tropomyosin to decrease with transformation. We also discover that high-molecular-weight (HMW), unlike low-molecular-weight (LMW), tropomyosin isoforms are primarily co-polymerized with actin in untransformed cells. This differential partitioning of tropomyosins is not due to a lack of N-terminal acetylation of LMW tropomyosins, but it is, in part, explained by the susceptibility of soluble HMW tropomyosins to proteasomal degradation. We conclude that actin-tropomyosin co-polymers make up a major fraction of the human actin cytoskeleton.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - G1000213(United Kingdom)

Selective Loss of PARG Restores PARylation and Counteracts PARP Inhibitor-Mediated Synthetic Lethality.

  • Gogola E
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2018 Jun 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase (PARPi) have recently entered the clinic for the treatment of homologous recombination (HR)-deficient cancers. Despite the success of this approach, drug resistance is a clinical hurdle, and we poorly understand how cancer cells escape the deadly effects of PARPi without restoring the HR pathway. By combining genetic screens with multi-omics analysis of matched PARPi-sensitive and -resistant Brca2-mutated mouse mammary tumors, we identified loss of PAR glycohydrolase (PARG) as a major resistance mechanism. We also found the presence of PARG-negative clones in a subset of human serous ovarian and triple-negative breast cancers. PARG depletion restores PAR formation and partially rescues PARP1 signaling. Importantly, PARG inactivation exposes vulnerabilities that can be exploited therapeutically.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM061835(United States)

Functional Domains of NEAT1 Architectural lncRNA Induce Paraspeckle Assembly through Phase Separation.

  • Yamazaki T
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Jun 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

A class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) has architectural functions in nuclear body construction; however, specific RNA domains dictating their architectural functions remain uninvestigated. Here, we identified the domains of the architectural NEAT1 lncRNA that construct paraspeckles. Systematic deletion of NEAT1 portions using CRISPR/Cas9 in haploid cells revealed modular domains of NEAT1 important for RNA stability, isoform switching, and paraspeckle assembly. The middle domain, containing functionally redundant subdomains, was responsible for paraspeckle assembly. Artificial tethering of the NONO protein to a NEAT1_2 mutant lacking the functional subdomains rescued paraspeckle assembly, and this required the NOPS dimerization domain of NONO. Paraspeckles exhibit phase-separated properties including susceptibility to 1,6-hexanediol treatment. RNA fragments of the NEAT1_2 subdomains preferentially bound NONO/SFPQ, leading to phase-separated aggregates in vitro. Thus, we demonstrate that the enrichment of NONO dimers on the redundant NEAT1_2 subdomains initiates construction of phase-separated paraspeckles, providing mechanistic insights into lncRNA-based nuclear body formation.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI050113(United States)

Stress Granule Assembly Disrupts Nucleocytoplasmic Transport.

  • Zhang K
  • Cell
  • 2018 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Defects in nucleocytoplasmic transport have been identified as a key pathogenic event in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) mediated by a GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72, the most common genetic cause of ALS/FTD. Furthermore, nucleocytoplasmic transport disruption has also been implicated in other neurodegenerative diseases with protein aggregation, suggesting a shared mechanism by which protein stress disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport. Here, we show that cellular stress disrupts nucleocytoplasmic transport by localizing critical nucleocytoplasmic transport factors into stress granules, RNA/protein complexes that play a crucial role in ALS pathogenesis. Importantly, inhibiting stress granule assembly, such as by knocking down Ataxin-2, suppresses nucleocytoplasmic transport defects as well as neurodegeneration in C9ORF72-mediated ALS/FTD. Our findings identify a link between stress granule assembly and nucleocytoplasmic transport, two fundamental cellular processes implicated in the pathogenesis of C9ORF72-mediated ALS/FTD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - (Canada)

Co-optation of Tandem DNA Repeats for the Maintenance of Mesenchymal Identity.

  • Balestrieri C
  • Cell
  • 2018 May 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

Tandem repeats (TRs) are generated by DNA replication errors and retain a high level of instability, which in principle would make them unsuitable for integration into gene regulatory networks. However, the appearance of DNA sequence motifs recognized by transcription factors may turn TRs into functional cis-regulatory elements, thus favoring their stabilization in genomes. Here, we show that, in human cells, the transcriptional repressor ZEB1, which promotes the maintenance of mesenchymal features largely by suppressing epithelial genes and microRNAs, occupies TRs harboring dozens of copies of its DNA-binding motif within genomic loci relevant for maintenance of epithelial identity. The deletion of one such TR caused quasi-mesenchymal cancer cells to reacquire epithelial features, partially recapitulating the effects of ZEB1 gene deletion. These data demonstrate that the high density of identical motifs in TRs can make them suitable platforms for recruitment of transcriptional repressors, thus promoting their exaptation into pre-existing cis-regulatory networks.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - 061858(United Kingdom)

Distinct roles of ATM and ATR in the regulation of ARP8 phosphorylation to prevent chromosome translocations.

  • Sun J
  • Elife
  • 2018 May 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Chromosomal translocations are hallmarks of various types of cancers and leukemias. However, the molecular mechanisms of chromosome translocations remain largely unknown. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein, a DNA damage signaling regulator, facilitates DNA repair to prevent chromosome abnormalities. Previously, we showed that ATM deficiency led to the 11q23 chromosome translocation, the most frequent chromosome abnormalities in secondary leukemia. Here, we show that ARP8, a subunit of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, is phosphorylated after etoposide treatment. The etoposide-induced phosphorylation of ARP8 is regulated by ATM and ATR, and attenuates its interaction with INO80. The ATM-regulated phosphorylation of ARP8 reduces the excessive loading of INO80 and RAD51 onto the breakpoint cluster region. These findings suggest that the phosphorylation of ARP8, regulated by ATM, plays an important role in maintaining the fidelity of DNA repair to prevent the etoposide-induced 11q23 abnormalities.

Funding information:
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP15H02821()
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP16H01312()
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP26430114()
  • KWF Kankerbestrijding - The Oncode Institute()
  • Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology - Program of the Joint Usage/Research Center of Kyoto University()
  • Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology - the Program of the network-type joint Usage/Research Center for ()
  • Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek - The gravitation program CancerGenomiCs.nl()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R37 AI042528(United States)

Boosting ATM activity alleviates aging and extends lifespan in a mouse model of progeria.

  • Qian M
  • Elife
  • 2018 May 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

DNA damage accumulates with age (Lombard et al., 2005). However, whether and how robust DNA repair machinery promotes longevity is elusive. Here, we demonstrate that ATM-centered DNA damage response (DDR) progressively declines with senescence and age, while low dose of chloroquine (CQ) activates ATM, promotes DNA damage clearance, rescues age-related metabolic shift, and prolongs replicative lifespan. Molecularly, ATM phosphorylates SIRT6 deacetylase and thus prevents MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Extra copies of Sirt6 extend lifespan in Atm-/- mice, with restored metabolic homeostasis. Moreover, the treatment with CQ remarkably extends lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans, but not the ATM-1 mutants. In a progeria mouse model with low DNA repair capacity, long-term administration of CQ ameliorates premature aging features and extends lifespan. Thus, our data highlights a pro-longevity role of ATM, for the first time establishing direct causal links between robust DNA repair machinery and longevity, and providing therapeutic strategy for progeria and age-related metabolic diseases.

Funding information:
  • Department of Health - (United Kingdom)
  • Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China - 2016YFC0904600()
  • Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China - 2017YFA0503900()
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China - 81422016()
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China - 81501206()
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China - 81501210()
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China - 81571374()
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China - 91439133()
  • Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province - 2014A030308011()
  • Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province - 2015A030308007()
  • Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province - 2016A030310064()
  • Research Grant Council of Hong Kong - 773313()
  • Research Grant Council of Hong Kong - HKU2/CRF/13G()
  • Shenzhen Science and Technology Innovation Commission - CXZZ20140903103747568()
  • Shenzhen Science and Technology Innovation Commission - JCYJ20140418095735645()
  • Shenzhen Science and Technology Innovation Commission - JCYJ20160226191451487()

Discovery and Characterization of ZUFSP/ZUP1, a Distinct Deubiquitinase Class Important for Genome Stability.

  • Kwasna D
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Apr 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are important regulators of ubiquitin signaling. Here, we report the discovery of deubiquitinating activity in ZUFSP/C6orf113. High-resolution crystal structures of ZUFSP in complex with ubiquitin reveal several distinctive features of ubiquitin recognition and catalysis. Our analyses reveal that ZUFSP is a novel DUB with no homology to any known DUBs, leading us to classify ZUFSP as the seventh DUB family. Intriguingly, the minimal catalytic domain does not cleave polyubiquitin. We identify two ubiquitin binding domains in ZUFSP: a ZHA (ZUFSP helical arm) that binds to the distal ubiquitin and an atypical UBZ domain in ZUFSP that binds to polyubiquitin. Importantly, both domains are essential for ZUFSP to selectively cleave K63-linked polyubiquitin. We show that ZUFSP localizes to DNA lesions, where it plays an important role in genome stability pathways, functioning to prevent spontaneous DNA damage and also promote cellular survival in response to exogenous DNA damage.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R21 AG040683(United States)

GPR68 Senses Flow and Is Essential for Vascular Physiology.

  • Xu J
  • Cell
  • 2018 Apr 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mechanotransduction plays a crucial role in vascular biology. One example of this is the local regulation of vascular resistance via flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Impairment of this process is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and a precursor to a wide array of vascular diseases, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Yet the molecules responsible for sensing flow (shear stress) within endothelial cells remain largely unknown. We designed a 384-well screening system that applies shear stress on cultured cells. We identified a mechanosensitive cell line that exhibits shear stress-activated calcium transients, screened a focused RNAi library, and identified GPR68 as necessary and sufficient for shear stress responses. GPR68 is expressed in endothelial cells of small-diameter (resistance) arteries. Importantly, Gpr68-deficient mice display markedly impaired acute FMD and chronic flow-mediated outward remodeling in mesenteric arterioles. Therefore, GPR68 is an essential flow sensor in arteriolar endothelium and is a critical signaling component in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - U24 CA126543(United States)

Ubiquitin Modulates Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation of UBQLN2 via Disruption of Multivalent Interactions.

  • Dao TP
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Mar 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Under stress, certain eukaryotic proteins and RNA assemble to form membraneless organelles known as stress granules. The most well-studied stress granule components are RNA-binding proteins that undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) into protein-rich droplets mediated by intrinsically disordered low-complexity domains (LCDs). Here we show that stress granules include proteasomal shuttle factor UBQLN2, an LCD-containing protein structurally and functionally distinct from RNA-binding proteins. In vitro, UBQLN2 exhibits LLPS at physiological conditions. Deletion studies correlate oligomerization with UBQLN2's ability to phase-separate and form stress-induced cytoplasmic puncta in cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we mapped weak, multivalent interactions that promote UBQLN2 oligomerization and LLPS. Ubiquitin or polyubiquitin binding, obligatory for UBQLN2's biological functions, eliminates UBQLN2 LLPS, thus serving as a switch between droplet and disperse phases. We postulate that UBQLN2 LLPS enables its recruitment to stress granules, where its interactions with ubiquitinated substrates reverse LLPS to enable shuttling of clients out of stress granules.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - 1R21CA131774(United States)

Circadian Control of DRP1 Activity Regulates Mitochondrial Dynamics and Bioenergetics.

  • Schmitt K
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Mar 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics and mitochondrial bioenergetics, including oxidative phosphorylation and generation of ATP, are strongly clock controlled. Here we show that these circadian oscillations depend on circadian modification of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), a key mediator of mitochondrial fission. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models, including human skin fibroblasts and DRP1-deficient or clock-deficient mice, to show that these dynamics are clock controlled via circadian regulation of DRP1. Genetic or pharmacological abrogation of DRP1 activity abolished circadian network dynamics and mitochondrial respiratory activity and eliminated circadian ATP production. Pharmacological silencing of pathways regulating circadian metabolism and mitochondrial function (e.g., sirtuins, AMPK) also altered DRP1 phosphorylation, and abrogation of DRP1 activity impaired circadian function. Our findings provide new insight into the crosstalk between the mitochondrial network and circadian cycles.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - G0300287(United Kingdom)

SPIN1 promotes tumorigenesis by blocking the uL18 (universal large ribosomal subunit protein 18)-MDM2-p53 pathway in human cancer.

  • Fang Z
  • Elife
  • 2018 Mar 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Ribosomal proteins (RPs) play important roles in modulating the MDM2-p53 pathway. However, less is known about the upstream regulators of the RPs. Here, we identify SPIN1 (Spindlin 1) as a novel binding partner of human RPL5/uL18 that is important for this pathway. SPIN1 ablation activates p53, suppresses cell growth, reduces clonogenic ability, and induces apoptosis of human cancer cells. Mechanistically, SPIN1 sequesters uL18 in the nucleolus, preventing it from interacting with MDM2, and thereby alleviating uL18-mediated inhibition of MDM2 ubiquitin ligase activity toward p53. SPIN1 deficiency increases ribosome-free uL18 and uL5 (human RPL11), which are required for SPIN1 depletion-induced p53 activation. Analysis of cancer genomic databases suggests that SPIN1 is highly expressed in several human cancers, and its overexpression is positively correlated with poor prognosis in cancer patients. Altogether, our findings reveal that the oncogenic property of SPIN1 may be attributed to its negative regulation of uL18, leading to p53 inactivation.

Funding information:
  • National Institutes of Health - 2G12MD007595()
  • National Institutes of Health - R01CA095441()
  • National Institutes of Health - R01CA127724()
  • National Institutes of Health - R01CA172468()
  • National Institutes of Health - R21 CA201889()
  • National Institutes of Health - R21CA190775()
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA89194(United States)

The Histone Chaperones ASF1 and CAF-1 Promote MMS22L-TONSL-Mediated Rad51 Loading onto ssDNA during Homologous Recombination in Human Cells.

  • Huang TH
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The access-repair-restore model for the role of chromatin in DNA repair infers that chromatin is a mere obstacle to DNA repair. However, here we show that blocking chromatin assembly, via knockdown of the histone chaperones ASF1 or CAF-1 or a mutation that prevents ASF1A binding to histones, hinders Rad51 loading onto ssDNA during homologous recombination. This is a consequence of reduced recruitment of the Rad51 loader MMS22L-TONSL to ssDNA, resulting in persistent RPA foci, extensive DNA end resection, persistent activation of the ATR-Chk1 pathway, and cell cycle arrest. In agreement, histones occupy ssDNA during DNA repair in yeast. We also uncovered DNA-PKcs-dependent DNA damage-induced ASF1A phosphorylation, which enhances chromatin assembly, promoting MMS22L-TONSL recruitment and, hence, Rad51 loading. We propose that transient assembly of newly synthesized histones onto ssDNA serves to recruit MMS22L-TONSL to efficiently form the Rad51 nucleofilament for strand invasion, suggesting an active role of chromatin assembly in homologous recombination.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - (United States)
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA095641()

As Extracellular Glutamine Levels Decline, Asparagine Becomes an Essential Amino Acid.

  • Pavlova NN
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Feb 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

When mammalian cells are deprived of glutamine, exogenous asparagine rescues cell survival and growth. Here we report that this rescue results from use of asparagine in protein synthesis. All mammalian cell lines tested lacked cytosolic asparaginase activity and could not utilize asparagine to produce other amino acids or biosynthetic intermediates. Instead, most glutamine-deprived cell lines are capable of sufficient glutamine synthesis to maintain essential amino acid uptake and production of glutamine-dependent biosynthetic precursors, with the exception of asparagine. While experimental introduction of cytosolic asparaginase could enhance the synthesis of glutamine and increase tricarboxylic acid cycle anaplerosis and the synthesis of nucleotide precursors, cytosolic asparaginase suppressed the growth and survival of cells in glutamine-depleted medium in vitro and severely compromised the in vivo growth of tumor xenografts. These results suggest that the lack of asparaginase activity represents an evolutionary adaptation to allow mammalian cells to survive pathophysiologic variations in extracellular glutamine.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA008748()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R21 AI091457(United States)

GRAM domain proteins specialize functionally distinct ER-PM contact sites in human cells.

  • Besprozvannaya M
  • Elife
  • 2018 Feb 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane contact sites (MCSs) are crucial regulatory hubs in cells, playing roles in signaling, organelle dynamics, and ion and lipid homeostasis. Previous work demonstrated that the highly conserved yeast Ltc/Lam sterol transporters localize and function at ER MCSs. Our analysis of the human family members, GRAMD1a and GRAMD2a, demonstrates that they are ER-PM MCS proteins, which mark separate regions of the plasma membrane (PM) and perform distinct functions in vivo. GRAMD2a, but not GRAMD1a, co-localizes with the E-Syt2/3 tethers at ER-PM contacts in a PIP lipid-dependent manner and pre-marks the subset of PI(4,5)P2-enriched ER-PM MCSs utilized for STIM1 recruitment. Data from an analysis of cells lacking GRAMD2a suggest that it is an organizer of ER-PM MCSs with pleiotropic functions including calcium homeostasis. Thus, our data demonstrate the existence of multiple ER-PM domains in human cells that are functionally specialized by GRAM-domain containing proteins.

Funding information:
  • National Institute of General Medical Sciences - R01GM062942()
  • National Institute of General Medical Sciences - R01GM097432()
  • National Institutes of Health - F32GM117689()
  • NCI NIH HHS - U54CA151880(United States)

Serine is the major residue for ADP-ribosylation upon DNA damage.

  • Palazzo L
  • Elife
  • 2018 Feb 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a family of enzymes that synthesise ADP-ribosylation (ADPr), a reversible modification of proteins that regulates many different cellular processes. Several mammalian PARPs are known to regulate the DNA damage response, but it is not clear which amino acids in proteins are the primary ADPr targets. Previously, we reported that ARH3 reverses the newly discovered type of ADPr (ADPr on serine residues; Ser-ADPr) and developed tools to analyse this modification (Fontana et al., 2017). Here, we show that Ser-ADPr represents the major fraction of ADPr synthesised after DNA damage in mammalian cells and that globally Ser-ADPr is dependent on HPF1, PARP1 and ARH3. In the absence of HPF1, glutamate/aspartate becomes the main target residues for ADPr. Furthermore, we describe a method for site-specific validation of serine ADP-ribosylated substrates in cells. Our study establishes serine as the primary form of ADPr in DNA damage signalling.

Funding information:
  • Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro - 14895()
  • Cancer Research UK - C35050/A22284()
  • Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - EXC 229()
  • European Research Council - 281739()
  • Horizon 2020 Framework Programme - 281739()
  • Horizon 2020 Framework Programme - 657501()
  • Wellcome - 101794()
  • Wellcome Trust - 101794()
  • Wellcome Trust - WT087675MA(United Kingdom)

Robust model-based analysis of single-particle tracking experiments with Spot-On.

  • Hansen AS
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jan 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Single-particle tracking (SPT) has become an important method to bridge biochemistry and cell biology since it allows direct observation of protein binding and diffusion dynamics in live cells. However, accurately inferring information from SPT studies is challenging due to biases in both data analysis and experimental design. To address analysis bias, we introduce 'Spot-On', an intuitive web-interface. Spot-On implements a kinetic modeling framework that accounts for known biases, including molecules moving out-of-focus, and robustly infers diffusion constants and subpopulations from pooled single-molecule trajectories. To minimize inherent experimental biases, we implement and validate stroboscopic photo-activation SPT (spaSPT), which minimizes motion-blur bias and tracking errors. We validate Spot-On using experimentally realistic simulations and show that Spot-On outperforms other methods. We then apply Spot-On to spaSPT data from live mammalian cells spanning a wide range of nuclear dynamics and demonstrate that Spot-On consistently and robustly infers subpopulation fractions and diffusion constants.

p53 orchestrates DNA replication restart homeostasis by suppressing mutagenic RAD52 and POLθ pathways.

  • Roy S
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jan 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Classically, p53 tumor suppressor acts in transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. Yet, replication-mediated genomic instability is integral to oncogenesis, and p53 mutations promote tumor progression and drug-resistance. By delineating human and murine separation-of-function p53 alleles, we find that p53 null and gain-of-function (GOF) mutations exhibit defects in restart of stalled or damaged DNA replication forks that drive genomic instability, which isgenetically separable from transcription activation. By assaying protein-DNA fork interactions in single cells, we unveil a p53-MLL3-enabled recruitment of MRE11 DNA replication restart nuclease. Importantly, p53 defects or depletion unexpectedly allow mutagenic RAD52 and POLθ pathways to hijack stalled forks, which we find reflected in p53 defective breast-cancer patient COSMIC mutational signatures. These data uncover p53 as a keystone regulator of replication homeostasis within a DNA restart network. Mechanistically, this has important implications for development of resistance in cancer therapy. Combined, these results define an unexpected role for p53-mediated suppression of replication genome instability.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI038382(United States)

Replication Study: Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells.

  • Vanden Heuvel JP
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jan 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

In 2016, as part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we published a Registered Report (Vanden Heuvel et al., 2016), that described how we intended to replicate selected experiments from the paper 'Systematic identification of genomic markers of drug sensitivity in cancer cells' (Garnett et al., 2012). Here we report the results. We found Ewing's sarcoma cell lines, overall, were more sensitive to the PARP inhibitor olaparib than osteosarcoma cell lines; however, while the effect was in the same direction as the original study (Figure 4C; Garnett et al., 2012), it was not statistically significant. Further, mouse mesenchymal cells transformed with either the EWS-FLI1 or FUS-CHOP rearrangement displayed similar sensitivities to olaparib, whereas the Ewing's sarcoma cell line SK-N-MC had increased olaparib sensitivity. In the original study, mouse mesenchymal cells transformed with the EWS-FLI1 rearrangement and SK-N-MC cells were found to have similar sensitivities to olaparib, whereas mesenchymal cells transformed with the FUS-CHOP rearrangement displayed a reduced sensitivity to olaparib (Figure 4E; Garnett et al., 2012). We also studied another Ewing's sarcoma cell line, A673: A673 cells depleted of EWS-FLI1 or a negative control both displayed similar sensitivities to olaparib, whereas the original study reported a decreased sensitivity to olaparib when EWS-FLI1 was depleted (Figure 4F; Garnett et al., 2012). Differences between the original study and this replication attempt, such as the use of different sarcoma cell lines and level of knockdown efficiency, are factors that might have influenced the outcomes. Finally, where possible, we report meta-analyses for each result.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG040288(United States)

NF-κB Dynamics Discriminate between TNF Doses in Single Cells.

  • Zhang Q
  • Cell Syst
  • 2017 Dec 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

Although cytokine-dependent dynamics of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) are known to encode information that regulates cell fate decisions, it is unclear whether single-cell responses are switch-like or encode more information about cytokine dose. Here, we measure the dynamic subcellular localization of NF-κB in response to a range of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) stimulation conditions to determine the prevailing mechanism of single-cell dose discrimination. Using an information theory formalism that accounts for signaling dynamics and non-responsive cell subpopulations, we find that the information transmission capacity of single cells exceeds that predicted from a switch-like response. Instead, we observe that NF-κB dynamics within single cells contain sufficient information to encode multiple, TNF-dependent cellular states, and have an activation threshold that varies across the population. By comparing single-cell responses to an internal, experimentally observed reference, we demonstrate that cells can grade responses to TNF across several orders of magnitude in concentration. This suggests that cells contain additional control points to fine-tune their cytokine responses beyond the decision to activate.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - P41 GM103712()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R35 GM119462()

Structural Basis for Regulated Proteolysis by the α-Secretase ADAM10.

  • Seegar TCM
  • Cell
  • 2017 Dec 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cleavage of membrane-anchored proteins by ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) endopeptidases plays a key role in a wide variety of biological signal transduction and protein turnover processes. Among ADAM family members, ADAM10 stands out as particularly important because it is both responsible for regulated proteolysis of Notch receptors and catalyzes the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase cleavage of the Alzheimer's precursor protein (APP). We present here the X-ray crystal structure of the ADAM10 ectodomain, which, together with biochemical and cellular studies, reveals how access to the enzyme active site is regulated. The enzyme adopts an unanticipated architecture in which the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain partially occludes the enzyme active site, preventing unfettered substrate access. Binding of a modulatory antibody to the cysteine-rich domain liberates the catalytic domain from autoinhibition, enhancing enzymatic activity toward a peptide substrate. Together, these studies reveal a mechanism for regulation of ADAM activity and offer a roadmap for its modulation.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01 CA119070()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA092433()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R35 CA220340()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - T32 HL007627()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG016379(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - P41 GM103403()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS038486()

A Method for the Acute and Rapid Degradation of Endogenous Proteins.

  • Clift D
  • Cell
  • 2017 Dec 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Methods for the targeted disruption of protein function have revolutionized science and greatly expedited the systematic characterization of genes. Two main approaches are currently used to disrupt protein function: DNA knockout and RNA interference, which act at the genome and mRNA level, respectively. A method that directly alters endogenous protein levels is currently not available. Here, we present Trim-Away, a technique to degrade endogenous proteins acutely in mammalian cells without prior modification of the genome or mRNA. Trim-Away harnesses the cellular protein degradation machinery to remove unmodified native proteins within minutes of application. This rapidity minimizes the risk that phenotypes are compensated and that secondary, non-specific defects accumulate over time. Because Trim-Away utilizes antibodies, it can be applied to a wide range of target proteins using off-the-shelf reagents. Trim-Away allows the study of protein function in diverse cell types, including non-dividing primary cells where genome- and RNA-targeting methods are limited.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - P30 DC04657(United States)

Cyclin A/Cdk1 modulates Plk1 activity in prometaphase to regulate kinetochore-microtubule attachment stability.

  • Dumitru AMG
  • Elife
  • 2017 Nov 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

The fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis is safeguarded by the precise regulation of kinetochore microtubule (k-MT) attachment stability. Previously, we demonstrated that Cyclin A/Cdk1 destabilizes k-MT attachments to promote faithful chromosome segregation. Here, we use quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify 156 Cyclin A/Cdk1 substrates in prometaphase. One Cyclin A/Cdk1 substrate is myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1), and we show that MYPT1 localization to kinetochores depends on Cyclin A/Cdk1 activity and that MYPT1 destabilizes k-MT attachments by negatively regulating Plk1 at kinetochores. Thus, Cyclin A/Cdk1 phosphorylation primes MYPT1 for Plk1 binding. Interestingly, priming of PBIP1 by Plk1 itself (self-priming) increased in MYPT1-depleted cells showing that MYPT1 provides a molecular link between the processes of Cdk1-dependent priming and self-priming of Plk1 substrates. These data demonstrate cross-regulation between Cyclin A/Cdk1-dependent and Plk1-dependent phosphorylation of substrates during mitosis to ensure efficient correction of k-MT attachment errors necessary for high mitotic fidelity.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - AG012609(United States)

TFEB regulates lysosomal positioning by modulating TMEM55B expression and JIP4 recruitment to lysosomes.

  • Willett R
  • Nat Commun
  • 2017 Nov 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

Lysosomal distribution is linked to the role of lysosomes in many cellular functions, including autophagosome degradation, cholesterol homeostasis, antigen presentation, and cell invasion. Alterations in lysosomal positioning contribute to different human pathologies, such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and lysosomal storage diseases. Here we report the identification of a novel mechanism of lysosomal trafficking regulation. We found that the lysosomal transmembrane protein TMEM55B recruits JIP4 to the lysosomal surface, inducing dynein-dependent transport of lysosomes toward the microtubules minus-end. TMEM55B overexpression causes lysosomes to collapse into the cell center, whereas depletion of either TMEM55B or JIP4 results in dispersion toward the cell periphery. TMEM55B levels are transcriptionally upregulated following TFEB and TFE3 activation by starvation or cholesterol-induced lysosomal stress. TMEM55B or JIP4 depletion abolishes starvation-induced retrograde lysosomal transport and prevents autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Overall our data suggest that the TFEB/TMEM55B/JIP4 pathway coordinates lysosome movement in response to a variety of stress conditions.

Orchestration of DNA Damage Checkpoint Dynamics across the Human Cell Cycle.

  • Chao HX
  • Cell Syst
  • 2017 Nov 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Although molecular mechanisms that prompt cell-cycle arrest in response to DNA damage have been elucidated, the systems-level properties of DNA damage checkpoints are not understood. Here, using time-lapse microscopy and simulations that model the cell cycle as a series of Poisson processes, we characterize DNA damage checkpoints in individual, asynchronously proliferating cells. We demonstrate that, within early G1 and G2, checkpoints are stringent: DNA damage triggers an abrupt, all-or-none cell-cycle arrest. The duration of this arrest correlates with the severity of DNA damage. After the cell passes commitment points within G1 and G2, checkpoint stringency is relaxed. By contrast, all of S phase is comparatively insensitive to DNA damage. This checkpoint is graded: instead of halting the cell cycle, increasing DNA damage leads to slower S phase progression. In sum, we show that a cell's response to DNA damage depends on its exact cell-cycle position and that checkpoints are phase-dependent, stringent or relaxed, and graded or all-or-none.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - DP2 HD091800()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - K99 GM102372()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R00 GM102372()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM083024()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM102413()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM067553()

ASF1a Promotes Non-homologous End Joining Repair by Facilitating Phosphorylation of MDC1 by ATM at Double-Strand Breaks.

  • Lee KY
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Double-strand breaks (DSBs) of DNA in eukaryotic cells are predominantly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The histone chaperone anti-silencing factor 1a (ASF1a) interacts with MDC1 and is recruited to sites of DSBs to facilitate the interaction of phospho-ATM with MDC1 and phosphorylation of MDC1, which are required for the recruitment of RNF8/RNF168 histone ubiquitin ligases. Thus, ASF1a deficiency reduces histone ubiquitination at DSBs, decreasing the recruitment of 53BP1, and decreases NHEJ, rendering cells more sensitive to DSBs. This role of ASF1a in DSB repair cannot be provided by the closely related ASF1b and does not require its histone chaperone activity. Homozygous deletion of ASF1A is seen in 10%-15% of certain cancers, suggesting that loss of NHEJ may be selected in some malignancies and that the deletion can be used as a molecular biomarker for cancers susceptible to radiotherapy or to DSB-inducing chemotherapy.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA044579()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA060499()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA166054()

Coordinated Splicing of Regulatory Detained Introns within Oncogenic Transcripts Creates an Exploitable Vulnerability in Malignant Glioma.

  • Braun CJ
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2017 Oct 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glioblastoma (GBM) is a devastating malignancy with few therapeutic options. We identify PRMT5 in an in vivo GBM shRNA screen and show that PRMT5 knockdown or inhibition potently suppresses in vivo GBM tumors, including patient-derived xenografts. Pathway analysis implicates splicing in cellular PRMT5 dependency, and we identify a biomarker that predicts sensitivity to PRMT5 inhibition. We find that PRMT5 deficiency primarily disrupts the removal of detained introns (DIs). This impaired DI splicing affects proliferation genes, whose downregulation coincides with cell cycle defects, senescence and/or apoptosis. We further show that DI programs are evolutionarily conserved and operate during neurogenesis, suggesting that they represent a physiological regulatory mechanism. Collectively, these findings reveal a PRMT5-regulated DI-splicing program as an exploitable cancer vulnerability.

Proteomic analysis of cell cycle progression in asynchronous cultures, including mitotic subphases, using PRIMMUS.

  • Ly T
  • Elife
  • 2017 Oct 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

The temporal regulation of protein abundance and post-translational modifications is a key feature of cell division. Recently, we analysed gene expression and protein abundance changes during interphase under minimally perturbed conditions (Ly et al., 2014, 2015). Here, we show that by using specific intracellular immunolabelling protocols, FACS separation of interphase and mitotic cells, including mitotic subphases, can be combined with proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry. Using this PRIMMUS (PRoteomic analysis of Intracellular iMMUnolabelled cell Subsets) approach, we now compare protein abundance and phosphorylation changes in interphase and mitotic fractions from asynchronously growing human cells. We identify a set of 115 phosphorylation sites increased during G2, termed 'early risers'. This set includes phosphorylation of S738 on TPX2, which we show is important for TPX2 function and mitotic progression. Further, we use PRIMMUS to provide the first a proteome-wide analysis of protein abundance remodeling between prophase, prometaphase and anaphase.

Protocol for Establishing a Multiplex Image-based Autophagy RNAi Screen in Cell Cultures.

  • Jung J
  • Bio Protoc
  • 2017 Sep 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Autophagy is a recycling pathway, in which intracellular cargoes including protein aggregates and bacteria are engulfed by autophagosomes and subsequently degraded after fusion with lysosomes. Dysregulation of this process is involved in several human diseases such as cancer or neurodegeneration. Hence, advancing our understanding of how autophagy is regulated provides an opportunity to explore druggable targets and subsequently develop treatment strategies for these diseases. To identify novel autophagy regulators, we developed an image-based phenotypic RNAi screening approach using autophagic marker proteins at endogenous levels (Jung et al., 2017). In contrast to previously performed autophagy screens, this approach does not use overexpressed, tagged autophagy marker proteins but rather detects autophagic structures at endogenous levels. Furthermore, we monitored early and late phases of autophagy in parallel while other screens employed only a single autophagosome marker mostly GFP-LC3B. Here, we describe this multiplex screening protocol in detail and discuss general considerations about how to establish image-based siRNA screens.

Funding information:
  • European Research Council - 282333()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - 5P20GM103636(United States)

TIA1 Mutations in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia Promote Phase Separation and Alter Stress Granule Dynamics.

  • Mackenzie IR
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Aug 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are age-related neurodegenerative disorders with shared genetic etiologies and overlapping clinical and pathological features. Here we studied a novel ALS/FTD family and identified the P362L mutation in the low-complexity domain (LCD) of T cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1). Subsequent genetic association analyses showed an increased burden of TIA1 LCD mutations in ALS patients compared to controls (p = 8.7 × 10-6). Postmortem neuropathology of five TIA1 mutations carriers showed a consistent pathological signature with numerous round, hyaline, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive inclusions. TIA1 mutations significantly increased the propensity of TIA1 protein to undergo phase transition. In live cells, TIA1 mutations delayed stress granule (SG) disassembly and promoted the accumulation of non-dynamic SGs that harbored TDP-43. Moreover, TDP-43 in SGs became less mobile and insoluble. The identification of TIA1 mutations in ALS/FTD reinforces the importance of RNA metabolism and SG dynamics in ALS/FTD pathogenesis.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - R35 NS097974()

Ccdc3: A New P63 Target Involved in Regulation Of Liver Lipid Metabolism.

  • Liao W
  • Sci Rep
  • 2017 Aug 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

TAp63, a member of the p53 family, has been shown to regulate energy metabolism. Here, we report coiled coil domain-containing 3 (CCDC3) as a new TAp63 target. TAp63, but not ΔNp63, p53 or p73, upregulates CCDC3 expression by directly binding to its enhancer region. The CCDC3 expression is markedly reduced in TAp63-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and brown adipose tissues and by tumor necrosis factor alpha that reduces p63 transcriptional activity, but induced by metformin, an anti-diabetic drug that activates p63. Also, the expression of CCDC3 is positively correlated with TAp63 levels, but conversely with ΔNp63 levels, during adipocyte differentiation. Interestingly, CCDC3, as a secreted protein, targets liver cancer cells and increases long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, but decreases ceramide in the cells. CCDC3 alleviates glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and steatosis formation in transgenic CCDC3 mice on high-fat diet (HFD) by reducing the expression of hepatic PPARγ and its target gene CIDEA as well as other genes involved in de novo lipogenesis. Similar results are reproduced by hepatic expression of ectopic CCDC3 in mice on HFD. Altogether, these results demonstrate that CCDC3 modulates liver lipid metabolism by inhibiting liver de novo lipogenesis as a downstream player of the p63 network.

RADX Promotes Genome Stability and Modulates Chemosensitivity by Regulating RAD51 at Replication Forks.

  • Dungrawala H
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Aug 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

RAD51 promotes homology-directed repair (HDR), replication fork reversal, and stalled fork protection. Defects in these functions cause genomic instability and tumorigenesis but also generate hypersensitivity to cancer therapeutics. Here we describe the identification of RADX as an RPA-like, single-strand DNA binding protein. RADX is recruited to replication forks, where it prevents fork collapse by regulating RAD51. When RADX is inactivated, excessive RAD51 activity slows replication elongation and causes double-strand breaks. In cancer cells lacking BRCA2, RADX deletion restores fork protection without restoring HDR. Furthermore, RADX inactivation confers chemotherapy and PARP inhibitor resistance to cancer cells with reduced BRCA2/RAD51 pathway function. By antagonizing RAD51 at forks, RADX allows cells to maintain a high capacity for HDR while ensuring that replication functions of RAD51 are properly regulated. Thus, RADX is essential to achieve the proper balance of RAD51 activity to maintain genome stability.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01 CA092584()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM116616()

The High-Affinity Interaction between ORC and DNA that Is Required for Replication Licensing Is Inhibited by 2-Arylquinolin-4-Amines.

  • Gardner NJ
  • Cell Chem Biol
  • 2017 Aug 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

In late mitosis and G1, origins of DNA replication must be "licensed" for use in the upcoming S phase by being encircled by double hexamers of the minichromosome maintenance proteins MCM2-7. A "licensing checkpoint" delays cells in G1 until sufficient origins have been licensed, but this checkpoint is lost in cancer cells. Inhibition of licensing can therefore kill cancer cells while only delaying normal cells in G1. In a high-throughput cell-based screen for licensing inhibitors we identified a family of 2-arylquinolin-4-amines, the most potent of which we call RL5a. The binding of the origin recognition complex (ORC) to origin DNA is the first step of the licensing reaction. We show that RL5a prevents ORC forming a tight complex with DNA that is required for MCM2-7 loading. Formation of this ORC-DNA complex requires ATP, and we show that RL5a inhibits ORC allosterically to mimic a lack of ATP.

A Splice Variant of Centrosomin Converts Mitochondria to Microtubule-Organizing Centers.

  • Chen JV
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 Jul 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Non-centrosomal microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) direct microtubule (MT) organization to exert diverse cell-type-specific functions. In Drosophila spermatids, the giant mitochondria provide structural platforms for MT reorganization to support elongation of the extremely long sperm. However, the molecular basis for this mitochondrial MTOC and other non-centrosomal MTOCs has not been discerned. Here we report that Drosophila centrosomin (cnn) expresses two major protein variants: the centrosomal form (CnnC) and a non-centrosomal form in testes (CnnT). CnnC is established as essential for functional centrosomes, the major MTOCs in animal cells. We show that CnnT is expressed exclusively in testes by alternative splicing and localizes to giant mitochondria in spermatids. In cell culture, CnnT targets to the mitochondrial surface, recruits the MT nucleator γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), and is sufficient to convert mitochondria to MTOCs independent of core pericentriolar proteins that regulate MT assembly at centrosomes. We mapped two separate domains in CnnT: one that is necessary and sufficient to target it to mitochondria and another that is necessary and sufficient to recruit γ-TuRCs and nucleate MTs. In elongating spermatids, CnnT forms speckles on the giant mitochondria that are required to recruit γ-TuRCs to organize MTs and support spermiogenesis. This molecular characterization of the mitochondrial MTOC defines a minimal molecular requirement for MTOC generation and implicates the potent role of Cnn (or its related) proteins in the direct regulation of MT assembly and organization of non-centrosomal MTOCs.

How to Increase Brightness of Near-Infrared Fluorescent Proteins in Mammalian Cells.

  • Shemetov AA
  • Cell Chem Biol
  • 2017 Jun 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Numerous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent proteins (FPs) were recently engineered from bacterial photoreceptors but lack of their systematic comparison makes researcher's choice rather difficult. Here we evaluated side-by-side several modern NIR FPs, such as blue-shifted smURFP and miRFP670, and red-shifted mIFP and miRFP703. We found that among all NIR FPs, miRFP670 had the highest fluorescence intensity in various mammalian cells. For instance, in common HeLa cells miRFP703, mIFP, and smURFP were 2-, 9-, and 53-fold dimmer than miRFP670. Either co-expression of heme oxygenase or incubation of cells with heme precursor weakly affected NIR fluorescence, however, in the latter case elevated cellular autofluorescence. Exogenously added chromophore substantially increased smURFP brightness but only slightly enhanced brightness of other NIR FPs. mIFP showed intermediate, while monomeric miRFP670 and miRFP703 exhibited high binding efficiency of endogenous biliverdin chromophore. This feature makes them easy to use as GFP-like proteins for spectral multiplexing with FPs of visible range.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R35 GM122567()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - U01 NS099573()

RECQ5 Helicase Cooperates with MUS81 Endonuclease in Processing Stalled Replication Forks at Common Fragile Sites during Mitosis.

  • Di Marco S
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The MUS81-EME1 endonuclease cleaves late replication intermediates at common fragile sites (CFSs) during early mitosis to trigger DNA-repair synthesis that ensures faithful chromosome segregation. Here, we show that these DNA transactions are promoted by RECQ5 DNA helicase in a manner dependent on its Ser727 phosphorylation by CDK1. Upon replication stress, RECQ5 associates with CFSs in early mitosis through its physical interaction with MUS81 and promotes MUS81-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis. RECQ5 depletion or mutational inactivation of its ATP-binding site, RAD51-interacting domain, or phosphorylation site causes excessive binding of RAD51 to CFS loci and impairs CFS expression. This leads to defective chromosome segregation and accumulation of CFS-associated DNA damage in G1 cells. Biochemically, RECQ5 alleviates the inhibitory effect of RAD51 on 3'-flap DNA cleavage by MUS81-EME1 through its RAD51 filament disruption activity. These data suggest that RECQ5 removes RAD51 filaments stabilizing stalled replication forks at CFSs and hence facilitates CFS cleavage by MUS81-EME1.

MLL/WDR5 Complex Regulates Kif2A Localization to Ensure Chromosome Congression and Proper Spindle Assembly during Mitosis.

  • Ali A
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Jun 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL), along with multisubunit (WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30) complex catalyzes the trimethylation of H3K4, leading to gene activation. Here, we characterize a chromatin-independent role for MLL during mitosis. MLL and WDR5 localize to the mitotic spindle apparatus, and loss of function of MLL complex by RNAi results in defects in chromosome congression and compromised spindle formation. We report interaction of MLL complex with several kinesin and dynein motors. We further show that the MLL complex associates with Kif2A, a member of the Kinesin-13 family of microtubule depolymerase, and regulates the spindle localization of Kif2A during mitosis. We have identified a conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif, so far unique to the MLL family, in Kif2A. The Win motif of Kif2A engages in direct interactions with WDR5 for its spindle localization. Our findings highlight a non-canonical mitotic function of MLL complex, which may have a direct impact on chromosomal stability, frequently compromised in cancer.

A Class of Environmental and Endogenous Toxins Induces BRCA2 Haploinsufficiency and Genome Instability.

  • Tan SLW
  • Cell
  • 2017 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mutations truncating a single copy of the tumor suppressor, BRCA2, cause cancer susceptibility. In cells bearing such heterozygous mutations, we find that a cellular metabolite and ubiquitous environmental toxin, formaldehyde, stalls and destabilizes DNA replication forks, engendering structural chromosomal aberrations. Formaldehyde selectively depletes BRCA2 via proteasomal degradation, a mechanism of toxicity that affects very few additional cellular proteins. Heterozygous BRCA2 truncations, by lowering pre-existing BRCA2 expression, sensitize to BRCA2 haploinsufficiency induced by transient exposure to natural concentrations of formaldehyde. Acetaldehyde, an alcohol catabolite detoxified by ALDH2, precipitates similar effects. Ribonuclease H1 ameliorates replication fork instability and chromosomal aberrations provoked by aldehyde-induced BRCA2 haploinsufficiency, suggesting that BRCA2 inactivation triggers spontaneous mutagenesis during DNA replication via aberrant RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops). These findings suggest a model wherein carcinogenesis in BRCA2 mutation carriers can be incited by compounds found pervasively in the environment and generated endogenously in certain tissues with implications for public health.

Systematic Quantification of Population Cell Death Kinetics in Mammalian Cells.

  • Forcina GC
  • Cell Syst
  • 2017 Jun 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cytotoxic compounds are important drugs and research tools. Here, we introduce a method, scalable time-lapse analysis of cell death kinetics (STACK), to quantify the kinetics of compound-induced cell death in mammalian cells at the population level. STACK uses live and dead cell markers, high-throughput time-lapse imaging, and mathematical modeling to determine the kinetics of population cell death over time. We used STACK to profile the effects of over 1,800 bioactive compounds on cell death in two human cancer cell lines, resulting in a large and freely available dataset. 79 potent lethal compounds common to both cell lines caused cell death with widely divergent kinetics. 13 compounds triggered cell death within hours, including the metallophore zinc pyrithione. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that this rapid onset lethal phenotype was caused in human cancer cells by metabolic disruption and ATP depletion. These results provide the first comprehensive survey of cell death kinetics and analysis of rapid-onset lethal compounds.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R00 CA166517()

Serine ADP-ribosylation reversal by the hydrolase ARH3.

  • Fontana P
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jun 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

ADP-ribosylation (ADPr) is a posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins that controls many cellular processes, including DNA repair, transcription, chromatin regulation and mitosis. A number of proteins catalyse the transfer and hydrolysis of ADPr, and also specify how and when the modification is conjugated to the targets. We recently discovered a new form of ADPr that is attached to serine residues in target proteins (Ser-ADPr) and showed that this PTM is specifically made by PARP1/HPF1 and PARP2/HPF1 complexes. In this work, we found by quantitative proteomics that histone Ser-ADPr is reversible in cells during response to DNA damage. By screening for the hydrolase that is responsible for the reversal of Ser-ADPr, we identified ARH3/ADPRHL2 as capable of efficiently and specifically removing Ser-ADPr of histones and other proteins. We further showed that Ser-ADPr is a major PTM in cells after DNA damage and that this signalling is dependent on ARH3.

Affimer proteins are versatile and renewable affinity reagents.

  • Tiede C
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jun 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

Molecular recognition reagents are key tools for understanding biological processes and are used universally by scientists to study protein expression, localisation and interactions. Antibodies remain the most widely used of such reagents and many show excellent performance, although some are poorly characterised or have stability or batch variability issues, supporting the use of alternative binding proteins as complementary reagents for many applications. Here we report on the use of Affimer proteins as research reagents. We selected 12 diverse molecular targets for Affimer selection to exemplify their use in common molecular and cellular applications including the (a) selection against various target molecules; (b) modulation of protein function in vitro and in vivo; (c) labelling of tumour antigens in mouse models; and (d) use in affinity fluorescence and super-resolution microscopy. This work shows that Affimer proteins, as is the case for other alternative binding scaffolds, represent complementary affinity reagents to antibodies for various molecular and cell biology applications.

Structural Analysis Reveals Features of Ribosome Assembly Factor Nsa1/WDR74 Important for Localization and Interaction with Rix7/NVL2.

  • Lo YH
  • Structure
  • 2017 May 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Ribosome assembly is a complex process that requires hundreds of essential assembly factors, including Rix7 (NVL2 in mammals) and Nsa1 (WDR74 in mammals). Rix7 is a type II double ring, AAA-ATPase, which is closely related to the well-known Cdc48/p97. Previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggest that Rix7 mediates the release of Nsa1 from nucleolar pre-60S particles; however, the underlying mechanisms of this release are unknown. Through multiple structural analyses we show that S. cerevisiae Nsa1 is composed of an N-terminal seven-bladed WD40 domain followed by a lysine-rich C terminus that extends away from the WD40 domain and is required for nucleolar localization. Co-immunoprecipitation assays with the mammalian homologs identified a well-conserved interface within WDR74 that is important for its association with NVL2. We further show that WDR74 associates with the D1 AAA domain of NVL2, which represents a novel mode of binding of a substrate with a type II AAA-ATPase.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA ES103247-01()
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - ZIA ES103247()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM105404()
  • NIH HHS - S10 OD018483()

Immunization-Elicited Broadly Protective Antibody Reveals Ebolavirus Fusion Loop as a Site of Vulnerability.

  • Zhao X
  • Cell
  • 2017 May 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

While neutralizing antibodies are highly effective against ebolavirus infections, current experimental ebolavirus vaccines primarily elicit species-specific antibody responses. Here, we describe an immunization-elicited macaque antibody (CA45) that clamps the internal fusion loop with the N terminus of the ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) and potently neutralizes Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, and Reston viruses. CA45, alone or in combination with an antibody that blocks receptor binding, provided full protection against all pathogenic ebolaviruses in mice, guinea pigs, and ferrets. Analysis of memory B cells from the immunized macaque suggests that elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for ebolaviruses is possible but difficult, potentially due to the rarity of bNAb clones and their precursors. Unexpectedly, germline-reverted CA45, while exhibiting negligible binding to full-length GP, bound a proteolytically remodeled GP with picomolar affinity, suggesting that engineered ebolavirus vaccines could trigger rare bNAb precursors more robustly. These findings have important implications for developing pan-ebolavirus vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktails.

RPL10L Is Required for Male Meiotic Division by Compensating for RPL10 during Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation in Mice.

  • Jiang L
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 May 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

The mammalian sex chromosomes have undergone profound changes during their evolution from an ancestral pair of autosomes [1-4]. Specifically, the X chromosome has acquired a paradoxical sex-biased function by redistributing gene contents [5, 6] and has generated a disproportionately high number of retrogenes that are located on autosomes and exhibit male-biased expression patterns [6]. Several selection-based models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, including a model of sexual antagonism driving X inactivation (SAXI) [6-8] and a compensatory mechanism based on meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) [6, 8-11]. However, experimental evidence correlating the function of X-chromosome-derived autosomal retrogenes with evolutionary forces remains limited [12-17]. Here, we show that the deficiency of Rpl10l, a murine autosomal retrogene of Rpl10 with testis-specific expression, disturbs ribosome biogenesis in late-prophase spermatocytes and prohibits the transition from prophase into metaphase of the first meiotic division, resulting in male infertility. Rpl10l expression compensates for the lack of Rpl10, which exhibits a broad expression pattern but is subject to MSCI during spermatogenesis. Importantly, ectopic expression of RPL10L prevents the death of cultured RPL10-deficient somatic cells, and Rpl10l-promoter-driven transgenic expression of Rpl10 in spermatocytes restores spermatogenesis and fertility in Rpl10l-deficient mice. Our results demonstrate that Rpl10l plays an essential role during the meiotic stage of spermatogenesis by compensating for MSCI-mediated transcriptional silencing of Rpl10. These data provide direct evidence for the compensatory hypothesis and add novel insight into the evolution of X-chromosome-derived autosomal retrogenes and their role in male fertility.

CTCF and cohesin regulate chromatin loop stability with distinct dynamics.

  • Hansen AS
  • Elife
  • 2017 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Folding of mammalian genomes into spatial domains is critical for gene regulation. The insulator protein CTCF and cohesin control domain location by folding domains into loop structures, which are widely thought to be stable. Combining genomic and biochemical approaches we show that CTCF and cohesin co-occupy the same sites and physically interact as a biochemically stable complex. However, using single-molecule imaging we find that CTCF binds chromatin much more dynamically than cohesin (~1-2 min vs. ~22 min residence time). Moreover, after unbinding, CTCF quickly rebinds another cognate site unlike cohesin for which the search process is long (~1 min vs. ~33 min). Thus, CTCF and cohesin form a rapidly exchanging 'dynamic complex' rather than a typical stable complex. Since CTCF and cohesin are required for loop domain formation, our results suggest that chromatin loops are dynamic and frequently break and reform throughout the cell cycle.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10 RR027303()
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10 RR029668()
  • NIBIB NIH HHS - U01 EB021236()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - U54 DK107980()

Structure of Fam20A reveals a pseudokinase featuring a unique disulfide pattern and inverted ATP-binding.

  • Cui J
  • Elife
  • 2017 Apr 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mutations in FAM20A cause tooth enamel defects known as Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) and renal calcification. We previously showed that Fam20A is a secretory pathway pseudokinase and allosterically activates the physiological casein kinase Fam20C to phosphorylate secreted proteins important for biomineralization (Cui et al., 2015). Here we report the nucleotide-free and ATP-bound structures of Fam20A. Fam20A exhibits a distinct disulfide bond pattern mediated by a unique insertion region. Loss of this insertion due to abnormal mRNA splicing interferes with the structure and function of Fam20A, resulting in AI. Fam20A binds ATP in the absence of divalent cations, and strikingly, ATP is bound in an inverted orientation compared to other kinases. Fam20A forms a dimer in the crystal, and residues in the dimer interface are critical for Fam20C activation. Together, these results provide structural insights into the function of Fam20A and shed light on the mechanism by which Fam20A mutations cause disease.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK018024()

Ribonucleotide Reductase Requires Subunit Switching in Hypoxia to Maintain DNA Replication.

  • Foskolou IP
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cells exposed to hypoxia experience replication stress but do not accumulate DNA damage, suggesting sustained DNA replication. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is the only enzyme capable of de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). However, oxygen is an essential cofactor for mammalian RNR (RRM1/RRM2 and RRM1/RRM2B), leading us to question the source of dNTPs in hypoxia. Here, we show that the RRM1/RRM2B enzyme is capable of retaining activity in hypoxia and therefore is favored over RRM1/RRM2 in order to preserve ongoing replication and avoid the accumulation of DNA damage. We found two distinct mechanisms by which RRM2B maintains hypoxic activity and identified responsible residues in RRM2B. The importance of RRM2B in the response to tumor hypoxia is further illustrated by correlation of its expression with a hypoxic signature in patient samples and its roles in tumor growth and radioresistance. Our data provide mechanistic insight into RNR biology, highlighting RRM2B as a hypoxic-specific, anti-cancer therapeutic target.

The RNF168 paralog RNF169 defines a new class of ubiquitylated histone reader involved in the response to DNA damage.

  • Kitevski-LeBlanc J
  • Elife
  • 2017 Apr 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

Site-specific histone ubiquitylation plays a central role in orchestrating the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs elicit a cascade of events controlled by the ubiquitin ligase RNF168, which promotes the accumulation of repair factors such as 53BP1 and BRCA1 on the chromatin flanking the break site. RNF168 also promotes its own accumulation, and that of its paralog RNF169, but how they recognize ubiquitylated chromatin is unknown. Using methyl-TROSY solution NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, we present an atomic resolution model of human RNF169 binding to a ubiquitylated nucleosome, and validate it by electron cryomicroscopy. We establish that RNF169 binds to ubiquitylated H2A-Lys13/Lys15 in a manner that involves its canonical ubiquitin-binding helix and a pair of arginine-rich motifs that interact with the nucleosome acidic patch. This three-pronged interaction mechanism is distinct from that by which 53BP1 binds to ubiquitylated H2A-Lys15 highlighting the diversity in site-specific recognition of ubiquitylated nucleosomes.

Lithocholic Acid Hydroxyamide Destabilizes Cyclin D1 and Induces G0/G1 Arrest by Inhibiting Deubiquitinase USP2a.

  • Magiera K
  • Cell Chem Biol
  • 2017 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

USP2a is a deubiquitinase responsible for stabilization of cyclin D1, a crucial regulator of cell-cycle progression and a proto-oncoprotein overexpressed in numerous cancer types. Here we report that lithocholic acid (LCA) derivatives are inhibitors of USP proteins, including USP2a. The most potent LCA derivative, LCA hydroxyamide (LCAHA), inhibits USP2a, leading to a significant Akt/GSK3β-independent destabilization of cyclin D1, but does not change the expression of p27. This leads to the defects in cell-cycle progression. As a result, LCAHA inhibits the growth of cyclin D1-expressing, but not cyclin D1-negative cells, independently of the p53 status. We show that LCA derivatives may be considered as future therapeutics for the treatment of cyclin D1-addicted p53-expressing and p53-defective cancer types.

Pacer Mediates the Function of Class III PI3K and HOPS Complexes in Autophagosome Maturation by Engaging Stx17.

  • Cheng X
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Mar 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Class III PI3-kinase (PI3KC3) is essential for autophagy initiation, but whether PI3KC3 participates in other steps of autophagy remains unknown. The HOPS complex mediates the fusion of intracellular vesicles to lysosome, but how HOPS specifically tethers autophagosome to lysosome remains elusive. Here, we report Pacer (protein associated with UVRAG as autophagy enhancer) as a regulator of autophagy. Pacer localizes to autophagic structures and positively regulates autophagosome maturation. Mechanistically, Pacer antagonizes Rubicon to stimulate Vps34 kinase activity. Next, Pacer recruits PI3KC3 and HOPS complexes to the autophagosome for their site-specific activation by anchoring to the autophagosomal SNARE Stx17. Furthermore, Pacer is crucial for the degradation of hepatic lipid droplets, the suppression of Salmonella infection, and the clearance of protein aggregates. These results not only identify Pacer as a crucial multifunctional enhancer in autophagy but also uncover both the involvement of PI3KC3 and the mediators of HOPS's specific tethering activity in autophagosome maturation.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R24 DK090962(United States)

Nek7 Protects Telomeres from Oxidative DNA Damage by Phosphorylation and Stabilization of TRF1.

  • Tan R
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Mar 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (TRF1) is essential to the maintenance of telomere chromatin structure and integrity. However, how telomere integrity is maintained, especially in response to damage, remains poorly understood. Here, we identify Nek7, a member of the Never in Mitosis Gene A (NIMA) kinase family, as a regulator of telomere integrity. Nek7 is recruited to telomeres and stabilizes TRF1 at telomeres after damage in an ATM activation-dependent manner. Nek7 deficiency leads to telomere aberrations, long-lasting γH2AX and 53BP1 foci, and augmented cell death upon oxidative telomeric DNA damage. Mechanistically, Nek7 interacts with and phosphorylates TRF1 on Ser114, which prevents TRF1 from binding to Fbx4, an Skp1-Cul1-F box E3 ligase subunit, thereby alleviating proteasomal degradation of TRF1, leading to a stable association of TRF1 with Tin2 to form a shelterin complex. Our data reveal a mechanism of efficient protection of telomeres from damage through Nek7-dependent stabilization of TRF1.

Systematic morphological profiling of human gene and allele function via Cell Painting.

  • Rohban MH
  • Elife
  • 2017 Mar 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

We hypothesized that human genes and disease-associated alleles might be systematically functionally annotated using morphological profiling of cDNA constructs, via a microscopy-based Cell Painting assay. Indeed, 50% of the 220 tested genes yielded detectable morphological profiles, which grouped into biologically meaningful gene clusters consistent with known functional annotation (e.g., the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK cascade). We used novel subpopulation-based visualization methods to interpret the morphological changes for specific clusters. This unbiased morphologic map of gene function revealed TRAF2/c-REL negative regulation of YAP1/WWTR1-responsive pathways. We confirmed this discovery of functional connectivity between the NF-κB pathway and Hippo pathway effectors at the transcriptional level, thereby expanding knowledge of these two signaling pathways that critically regulate tumor initiation and progression. We make the images and raw data publicly available, providing an initial morphological map of major biological pathways for future study.

Selective Chemical Inhibition of PGC-1α Gluconeogenic Activity Ameliorates Type 2 Diabetes.

  • Sharabi K
  • Cell
  • 2017 Mar 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a worldwide epidemic with a medical need for additional targeted therapies. Suppression of hepatic glucose production (HGP) effectively ameliorates diabetes and can be exploited for its treatment. We hypothesized that targeting PGC-1α acetylation in the liver, a chemical modification known to inhibit hepatic gluconeogenesis, could be potentially used for treatment of T2D. Thus, we designed a high-throughput chemical screen platform to quantify PGC-1α acetylation in cells and identified small molecules that increase PGC-1α acetylation, suppress gluconeogenic gene expression, and reduce glucose production in hepatocytes. On the basis of potency and bioavailability, we selected a small molecule, SR-18292, that reduces blood glucose, strongly increases hepatic insulin sensitivity, and improves glucose homeostasis in dietary and genetic mouse models of T2D. These studies have important implications for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of glucose metabolism and treatment of T2D.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - U54 HG005032()
  • NIDA NIH HHS - R03 DA032468()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - F32 DK102293()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK040936()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK069966()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R24 DK080261()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - U2C DK059635()

Single-Molecule Analysis of mtDNA Replication Uncovers the Basis of the Common Deletion.

  • Phillips AF
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Feb 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mutations in mtDNA lead to muscular and neurological diseases and are linked to aging. The most frequent aberrancy is the "common deletion" that involves a 4,977-bp region flanked by 13-bp repeats. To investigate the basis of this deletion, we developed a single-molecule mtDNA combing method. The analysis of replicating mtDNA molecules provided in vivo evidence in support of the asymmetric mode of replication. Furthermore, we observed frequent fork stalling at the junction of the common deletion, suggesting that impaired replication triggers the formation of this toxic lesion. In parallel experiments, we employed mito-TALENs to induce breaks in distinct loci of the mitochondrial genome and found that breaks adjacent to the 5' repeat trigger the common deletion. Interestingly, this process was mediated by the mitochondrial replisome independent of canonical DSB repair. Altogether, our data underscore a unique replication-dependent repair pathway that leads to the mitochondrial common deletion.

Multiplex image-based autophagy RNAi screening identifies SMCR8 as ULK1 kinase activity and gene expression regulator.

  • Jung J
  • Elife
  • 2017 Feb 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Autophagy is an intracellular recycling and degradation pathway that depends on membrane trafficking. Rab GTPases are central for autophagy but their regulation especially through the activity of Rab GEFs remains largely elusive. We employed a RNAi screen simultaneously monitoring different populations of autophagosomes and identified 34 out of 186 Rab GTPase, GAP and GEF family members as potential autophagy regulators, amongst them SMCR8. SMCR8 uses overlapping binding regions to associate with C9ORF72 or with a C9ORF72-ULK1 kinase complex holo-assembly, which function in maturation and formation of autophagosomes, respectively. While focusing on the role of SMCR8 during autophagy initiation, we found that kinase activity and gene expression of ULK1 are increased upon SMCR8 depletion. The latter phenotype involved association of SMCR8 with the ULK1 gene locus. Global mRNA expression analysis revealed that SMCR8 regulates transcription of several other autophagy genes including WIPI2. Collectively, we established SMCR8 as multifaceted negative autophagy regulator.

YOD1/TRAF6 association balances p62-dependent IL-1 signaling to NF-κB.

  • Schimmack G
  • Elife
  • 2017 Feb 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

The ubiquitin ligase TRAF6 is a key regulator of canonical IκB kinase (IKK)/NF-κB signaling in response to interleukin-1 (IL-1) stimulation. Here, we identified the deubiquitinating enzyme YOD1 (OTUD2) as a novel interactor of TRAF6 in human cells. YOD1 binds to the C-terminal TRAF homology domain of TRAF6 that also serves as the interaction surface for the adaptor p62/Sequestosome-1, which is required for IL-1 signaling to NF-κB. We show that YOD1 competes with p62 for TRAF6 association and abolishes the sequestration of TRAF6 to cytosolic p62 aggregates by a non-catalytic mechanism. YOD1 associates with TRAF6 in unstimulated cells but is released upon IL-1β stimulation, thereby facilitating TRAF6 auto-ubiquitination as well as NEMO/IKKγ substrate ubiquitination. Further, IL-1 triggered IKK/NF-κB signaling and induction of target genes is decreased by YOD1 overexpression and augmented after YOD1 depletion. Hence, our data define that YOD1 antagonizes TRAF6/p62-dependent IL-1 signaling to NF-κB.

Evaluation of recombinant monoclonal antibody SVmab1 binding to Na V1.7 target sequences and block of human Na V1.7 currents.

  • Liu D
  • F1000Res
  • 2016 Dec 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Identification of small and large molecule pain therapeutics that target the genetically validated voltage-gated sodium channel Na V1.7 is a challenging endeavor under vigorous pursuit. The monoclonal antibody SVmab1 was recently published to bind the Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain and block human Na V1.7 sodium currents in heterologous cells. We produced purified SVmab1 protein based on publically available sequence information, and evaluated its activity in a battery of binding and functional assays. Herein, we report that our recombinant SVmAb1 does not bind peptide immunogen or purified Na V1.7 DII voltage sensor domain via ELISA, and does not bind Na V1.7 in live HEK293, U-2 OS, and CHO-K1 cells via FACS. Whole cell manual patch clamp electrophysiology protocols interrogating diverse Na V1.7 gating states in HEK293 cells, revealed that recombinant SVmab1 does not block Na V1.7 currents to an extent greater than observed with an isotype matched control antibody. Collectively, our results show that recombinant SVmab1 monoclonal antibody does not bind Na V1.7 target sequences or specifically inhibit Na V1.7 current.

Single-Molecule Real-Time 3D Imaging of the Transcription Cycle by Modulation Interferometry.

  • Wang G
  • Cell
  • 2016 Dec 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Many essential cellular processes, such as gene control, employ elaborate mechanisms involving the coordination of large, multi-component molecular assemblies. Few structural biology tools presently have the combined spatial-temporal resolution and molecular specificity required to capture the movement, conformational changes, and subunit association-dissociation kinetics, three fundamental elements of how such intricate molecular machines work. Here, we report a 3D single-molecule super-resolution imaging study using modulation interferometry and phase-sensitive detection that achieves <2 nm axial localization precision, well below the few-nanometer-sized individual protein components. To illustrate the capability of this technique in probing the dynamics of complex macromolecular machines, we visualize the movement of individual multi-subunit E. coli RNA polymerases through the complete transcription cycle, dissect the kinetics of the initiation-elongation transition, and determine the fate of σ70 initiation factors during promoter escape. Modulation interferometry sets the stage for single-molecule studies of several hitherto difficult-to-investigate multi-molecular transactions that underlie genome regulation.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA008748()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - DP2 GM105443()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM053759()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R35 GM118130()

Ebola Virus Glycoprotein with Increased Infectivity Dominated the 2013-2016 Epidemic.

  • Diehl WE
  • Cell
  • 2016 Nov 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

The magnitude of the 2013-2016 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic enabled an unprecedented number of viral mutations to occur over successive human-to-human transmission events, increasing the probability that adaptation to the human host occurred during the outbreak. We investigated one nonsynonymous mutation, Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) mutant A82V, for its effect on viral infectivity. This mutation, located at the NPC1-binding site on EBOV GP, occurred early in the 2013-2016 outbreak and rose to high frequency. We found that GP-A82V had heightened ability to infect primate cells, including human dendritic cells. The increased infectivity was restricted to cells that have primate-specific NPC1 sequences at the EBOV interface, suggesting that this mutation was indeed an adaptation to the human host. GP-A82V was associated with increased mortality, consistent with the hypothesis that the heightened intrinsic infectivity of GP-A82V contributed to disease severity during the EVD epidemic.

Nuclear pore assembly proceeds by an inside-out extrusion of the nuclear envelope.

  • Otsuka S
  • Elife
  • 2016 Sep 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The nuclear pore complex (NPC) mediates nucleocytoplasmic transport through the nuclear envelope. How the NPC assembles into this double membrane boundary has remained enigmatic. Here, we captured temporally staged assembly intermediates by correlating live cell imaging with high-resolution electron tomography and super-resolution microscopy. Intermediates were dome-shaped evaginations of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), that grew in diameter and depth until they fused with the flat outer nuclear membrane. Live and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy revealed the molecular maturation of the intermediates, which initially contained the nuclear and cytoplasmic ring component Nup107, and only later the cytoplasmic filament component Nup358. EM particle averaging showed that the evagination base was surrounded by an 8-fold rotationally symmetric ring structure from the beginning and that a growing mushroom-shaped density was continuously associated with the deforming membrane. Quantitative structural analysis revealed that interphase NPC assembly proceeds by an asymmetric inside-out extrusion of the INM.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS051255(United States)

Cell-Type-Specific Alternative Splicing Governs Cell Fate in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

  • Zhang X
  • Cell
  • 2016 Aug 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Alternative splicing is prevalent in the mammalian brain. To interrogate the functional role of alternative splicing in neural development, we analyzed purified neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons from developing cerebral cortices, revealing hundreds of differentially spliced exons that preferentially alter key protein domains-especially in cytoskeletal proteins-and can harbor disease-causing mutations. We show that Ptbp1 and Rbfox proteins antagonistically govern the NPC-to-neuron transition by regulating neuron-specific exons. Whereas Ptbp1 maintains apical progenitors partly through suppressing a poison exon of Flna in NPCs, Rbfox proteins promote neuronal differentiation by switching Ninein from a centrosomal splice form in NPCs to a non-centrosomal isoform in neurons. We further uncover an intronic human mutation within a PTBP1-binding site that disrupts normal skipping of the FLNA poison exon in NPCs and causes a brain-specific malformation. Our study indicates that dynamic control of alternative splicing governs cell fate in cerebral cortical development.

Two Distinct Types of E3 Ligases Work in Unison to Regulate Substrate Ubiquitylation.

  • Scott DC
  • Cell
  • 2016 Aug 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hundreds of human cullin-RING E3 ligases (CRLs) modify thousands of proteins with ubiquitin (UB) to achieve vast regulation. Current dogma posits that CRLs first catalyze UB transfer from an E2 to their client substrates and subsequent polyubiquitylation from various linkage-specific E2s. We report an alternative E3-E3 tagging cascade: many cellular NEDD8-modified CRLs associate with a mechanistically distinct thioester-forming RBR-type E3, ARIH1, and rely on ARIH1 to directly add the first UB and, in some cases, multiple additional individual monoubiquitin modifications onto CRL client substrates. Our data define ARIH1 as a component of the human CRL system, demonstrate that ARIH1 can efficiently and specifically mediate monoubiquitylation of several CRL substrates, and establish principles for how two distinctive E3s can reciprocally control each other for simultaneous and joint regulation of substrate ubiquitylation. These studies have broad implications for CRL-dependent proteostasis and mechanisms of E3-mediated UB ligation.

Inactivation of oncogenic cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4D by miR-139-5p in response to p53 activation.

  • Cao B
  • Elife
  • 2016 Jul 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

Increasing evidence highlights the important roles of microRNAs in mediating p53's tumor suppression functions. Here, we report miR-139-5p as another new p53 microRNA target. p53 induced the transcription of miR-139-5p, which in turn suppressed the protein levels of phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D), an oncogenic protein involved in multiple tumor promoting processes. Knockdown of p53 reversed these effects. Also, overexpression of miR-139-5p decreased PDE4D levels and increased cellular cAMP levels, leading to BIM-mediated cell growth arrest. Furthermore, our analysis of human colorectal tumor specimens revealed significant inverse correlation between the expression of miR-139-5p and that of PDE4D. Finally, overexpression of miR-139-5p suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors, accompanied by decrease in PDE4D and increase in BIM. These results demonstrate that p53 inactivates oncogenic PDE4D by inducing the expression of miR-139-5p.

Centriole distal appendages promote membrane docking, leading to cilia initiation.

  • Tanos BE
  • Genes Dev.
  • 2013 Jan 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The distal appendages (DAPs) of centrioles have been proposed to anchor cilia to the plasma membrane, but their molecular composition, assembly, and exact function in ciliogenesis remain poorly understood. Using quantitative centrosome proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we identified five DAP components, including one previously described (CEP164), one partially characterized (CEP89 [ccdc123]), and three novel (CEP83 [ccdc41], SCLT1, and FBF1) DAP proteins. Analyses of DAP assembly revealed a hierarchy. CEP83 recruits both SCLT1 and CEP89 to centrioles. Subsequent recruitment of FBF1 and CEP164 is independent of CEP89 but mediated by SCLT1. All five DAP components are essential for ciliogenesis; loss of CEP83 specifically blocks centriole-to-membrane docking. Undocked centrioles fail to recruit TTBK2 or release CP110, the two earliest modifications found on centrioles prior to cilia assembly, revealing centriole-to-membrane docking as a temporal and spatial cue promoting cilia initiation.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA008748()
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10 RR031855()
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10RR031855()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - F32 GM096558()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - GM088253()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - GM096558()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM088253()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R21 NS054143(United States)