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HEK293T/17

RRID:CVCL_1926

Organism

Homo sapiens

Comments

Transfected with: UniProtKB; P00552; Transposon Tn5 neo. Transformant: NCBI_TaxID; 28285; Adenovirus 5. Transformant: NCBI_TaxID; 1891767; Simian virus 40 (SV40) [tsA]. Misspelling: 293/17; Occasionally. DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 24-05-19; Version: 13

Proper Citation

ATCC Cat# CRL-11268, RRID:CVCL_1926

Reference

PMID:7690960

Category

Transformed cell line DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 24-05-19; Version: 13

Sex

DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 24-05-19; Version: 13

Synonyms

HEK 293T/17, 293T/17 DT Created: 04-04-12, Last updated: 24-05-19, Version: 13

Vendor

ATCC

Cat Num

CRL-11268

Cross References

CLO; CLO_0001235 ATCC; CRL-11268 BioSample; SAMN03471332 CCRID; 3111C0001CCC000212 TOKU-E; 245 Wikidata; Q28178058 DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 24-05-19; Version: 13

Hierarchy

DT Created: 04-04-12; Last updated: 24-05-19; Version: 13

Developmental Upregulation of Ephrin-B1 Silences Sema3C/Neuropilin-1 Signaling during Post-crossing Navigation of Corpus Callosum Axons.

  • Mire E
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2018 Jun 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

The corpus callosum is the largest commissure in the brain, whose main function is to ensure communication between homotopic regions of the cerebral cortex. During fetal development, corpus callosum axons (CCAs) grow toward and across the brain midline and then away on the contralateral hemisphere to their targets. A particular feature of this circuit, which raises a key developmental question, is that the outgoing trajectory of post-crossing CCAs is mirror-symmetric with the incoming trajectory of pre-crossing axons. Here, we show that post-crossing CCAs switch off their response to axon guidance cues, among which the secreted Semaphorin-3C (Sema3C), that act as attractants for pre-crossing axons on their way to the midline. This change is concomitant with an upregulation of the surface protein Ephrin-B1, which acts in CCAs to inhibit Sema3C signaling via interaction with the Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) receptor. This silencing activity is independent of Eph receptors and involves a N-glycosylation site (N-139) in the extracellular domain of Ephrin-B1. Together, our results reveal a molecular mechanism, involving interaction between the two unrelated guidance receptors Ephrin-B1 and Nrp1, that is used to control the navigation of post-crossing axons in the corpus callosum.

Funding information:
  • NIH HHS - P40 OD010440(United States)

Immunomimetic Designer Cells Protect Mice from MRSA Infection.

  • Liu Y
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jun 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

Many community- and hospital-acquired bacterial infections are caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) predisposes humans to invasive infections that are difficult to eradicate. We designed a closed-loop gene network programming mammalian cells to autonomously detect and eliminate bacterial infections. The genetic circuit contains human Toll-like receptors as the bacterial sensor and a synthetic promoter driving reversible and adjustable expression of lysostaphin, a bacteriolytic enzyme highly lethal to S. aureus. Immunomimetic designer cells harboring this genetic circuit exhibited fast and robust sense-and-destroy kinetics against live staphylococci. When tested in a foreign-body infection model in mice, microencapsulated cell implants prevented planktonic MRSA infection and reduced MRSA biofilm formation by 91%. Notably, this system achieved a 100% cure rate of acute MRSA infections, whereas conventional vancomycin treatment failed. These results suggest that immunomimetic designer cells could offer a therapeutic approach for early detection, prevention, and cure of pathogenic infections in the post-antibiotic era.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - BB/J015652/1(United Kingdom)

Dual Requirement of CHD8 for Chromatin Landscape Establishment and Histone Methyltransferase Recruitment to Promote CNS Myelination and Repair.

  • Zhao C
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Jun 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Disruptive mutations in chromatin remodeler CHD8 cause autism spectrum disorders, exhibiting widespread white matter abnormalities; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We show that cell-type specific Chd8 deletion in oligodendrocyte progenitors, but not in neurons, results in myelination defects, revealing a cell-intrinsic dependence on CHD8 for oligodendrocyte lineage development, myelination and post-injury remyelination. CHD8 activates expression of BRG1-associated SWI/SNF complexes that in turn activate CHD7, thus initiating a successive chromatin remodeling cascade that orchestrates oligodendrocyte lineage progression. Genomic occupancy analyses reveal that CHD8 establishes an accessible chromatin landscape, and recruits MLL/KMT2 histone methyltransferase complexes distinctively around proximal promoters to promote oligodendrocyte differentiation. Inhibition of histone demethylase activity partially rescues myelination defects of CHD8-deficient mutants. Our data indicate that CHD8 exhibits a dual function through inducing a cascade of chromatin reprogramming and recruiting H3K4 histone methyltransferases to establish oligodendrocyte identity, suggesting potential strategies of therapeutic intervention for CHD8-associated white matter defects.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH087592(United States)

LSD1 Ablation Stimulates Anti-tumor Immunity and Enables Checkpoint Blockade.

  • Sheng W
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jun 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Chromatin regulators play a broad role in regulating gene expression and, when gone awry, can lead to cancer. Here, we demonstrate that ablation of the histone demethylase LSD1 in cancer cells increases repetitive element expression, including endogenous retroviral elements (ERVs), and decreases expression of RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) components. Significantly, this leads to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) stress and activation of type 1 interferon, which stimulates anti-tumor T cell immunity and restrains tumor growth. Furthermore, LSD1 depletion enhances tumor immunogenicity and T cell infiltration in poorly immunogenic tumors and elicits significant responses of checkpoint blockade-refractory mouse melanoma to anti-PD-1 therapy. Consistently, TCGA data analysis shows an inverse correlation between LSD1 expression and CD8+ T cell infiltration in various human cancers. Our study identifies LSD1 as a potent inhibitor of anti-tumor immunity and responsiveness to immunotherapy and suggests LSD1 inhibition combined with PD-(L)1 blockade as a novel cancer treatment strategy.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - U01-CA84967(United States)
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA118487()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R35 CA210104()
  • NCI NIH HHS - T32 CA207021()

Human Cytomegalovirus Protein UL31 Inhibits DNA Sensing of cGAS to Mediate Immune Evasion.

  • Huang ZF
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2018 Jun 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

The cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS recognizes viral DNA and synthesizes the second messenger cGAMP upon viral infection. cGAMP binds to the adaptor protein MITA/STING to activate downstream signaling events, leading to induction of type I interferons (IFNs) and antiviral effector genes. Here we identify the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) protein UL31 as an inhibitor of cGAS. UL31 interacts directly with cGAS and disassociates DNA from cGAS, thus inhibiting cGAS enzymatic functions and reducing cGAMP production. UL31 overexpression markedly reduces antiviral responses stimulated by cytosolic DNA, while knockdown or knockout of UL31 heightens HCMV-triggered induction of type I IFNs and downstream antiviral genes. Moreover, wild-type HCMV replicates more efficiently than UL31-deficient HCMV, a phenotype that is reversed in cGAS null cells. These results highlight the importance of cGAS in the host response to HCMV as well as an important viral strategy to evade this innate immune sensor.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - P41 RR008605(United States)

Gain-of-Function Mutation of Card14 Leads to Spontaneous Psoriasis-like Skin Inflammation through Enhanced Keratinocyte Response to IL-17A.

  • Wang M
  • Immunity
  • 2018 Jun 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Genetic mutations of CARD14 (encoding CARMA2) are observed in psoriasis patients. Here we showed that Card14E138A/+ and Card14ΔQ136/+ mice developed spontaneous psoriasis-like skin inflammation, which resulted from constitutively activated CARMA2 via self-aggregation leading to the enhanced activation of the IL-23-IL-17A cytokine axis. Card14-/- mice displayed attenuated skin inflammation in the imiquimod-induced psoriasis model due to impaired IL-17A signaling in keratinocytes. CARMA2, mainly expressed in keratinocytes, associates with the ACT1-TRAF6 signaling complex and mediates IL-17A-induced NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathway activation, which leads to expression of pro-inflammatory factors. Thus, CARMA2 serves as a key mediator of IL-17A signaling and its constitutive activation in keratinocytes leads to the onset of psoriasis, which indicates an important role of NF-κB activation in keratinocytes in psoriatic initiation.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM28896(United States)

A Modular Organization of LRR Protein-Mediated Synaptic Adhesion Defines Synapse Identity.

  • Schroeder A
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Jun 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

Pyramidal neurons express rich repertoires of leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing adhesion molecules with similar synaptogenic activity in culture. The in vivo relevance of this molecular diversity is unclear. We show that hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons express multiple synaptogenic LRR proteins that differentially distribute to the major excitatory inputs on their apical dendrites. At Schaffer collateral (SC) inputs, FLRT2, LRRTM1, and Slitrk1 are postsynaptically localized and differentially regulate synaptic structure and function. FLRT2 controls spine density, whereas LRRTM1 and Slitrk1 exert opposing effects on synaptic vesicle distribution at the active zone. All LRR proteins differentially affect synaptic transmission, and their combinatorial loss results in a cumulative phenotype. At temporoammonic (TA) inputs, LRRTM1 is absent; FLRT2 similarly controls functional synapse number, whereas Slitrk1 function diverges to regulate postsynaptic AMPA receptor density. Thus, LRR proteins differentially control synaptic architecture and function and act in input-specific combinations and a context-dependent manner to specify synaptic properties.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - DK72473(United States)

Visualizing conformational dynamics of proteins in solution and at the cell membrane.

  • Gordon SE
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jun 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Conformational dynamics underlie enzyme function, yet are generally inaccessible via traditional structural approaches. FRET has the potential to measure conformational dynamics in vitro and in intact cells, but technical barriers have thus far limited its accuracy, particularly in membrane proteins. Here, we combine amber codon suppression to introduce a donor fluorescent noncanonical amino acid with a new, biocompatible approach for labeling proteins with acceptor transition metals in a method called ACCuRET (Anap Cyclen-Cu2+ resonance energy transfer). We show that ACCuRET measures absolute distances and distance changes with high precision and accuracy using maltose binding protein as a benchmark. Using cell unroofing, we show that ACCuRET can accurately measure rearrangements of proteins in native membranes. Finally, we implement a computational method for correcting the measured distances for the distance distributions observed in proteins. ACCuRET thus provides a flexible, powerful method for measuring conformational dynamics in both soluble proteins and membrane proteins.

Funding information:
  • National Eye Institute - R01EY010329()
  • National Eye Institute - R01EY017564()
  • National Institute of General Medical Sciences - R01GM100718()
  • National Institute of General Medical Sciences - R01GM125351()
  • National Institute of Mental Health - R01MH102378()
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - U01 HG004726(United States)

The TORC1-Regulated CPA Complex Rewires an RNA Processing Network to Drive Autophagy and Metabolic Reprogramming.

  • Tang HW
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 May 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Nutrient deprivation induces autophagy through inhibiting TORC1 activity. We describe a novel mechanism in Drosophila by which TORC1 regulates RNA processing of Atg transcripts and alters ATG protein levels and activities via the cleavage and polyadenylation (CPA) complex. We show that TORC1 signaling inhibits CDK8 and DOA kinases, which directly phosphorylate CPSF6, a component of the CPA complex. These phosphorylation events regulate CPSF6 localization, RNA binding, and starvation-induced alternative RNA processing of transcripts involved in autophagy, nutrient, and energy metabolism, thereby controlling autophagosome formation and metabolism. Similarly, we find that mammalian CDK8 and CLK2, a DOA ortholog, phosphorylate CPSF6 to regulate autophagy and metabolic changes upon starvation, revealing an evolutionarily conserved mechanism linking TORC1 signaling with RNA processing, autophagy, and metabolism.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS050248(United States)

Unbiased Combinatorial Screening Identifies a Bispecific IgG1 that Potently Inhibits HER3 Signaling via HER2-Guided Ligand Blockade.

  • Geuijen CAW
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2018 May 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

HER2-driven cancers require phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling through HER3 to promote tumor growth and survival. The therapeutic benefit of HER2-targeting agents, which depend on PI3K/Akt inhibition, can be overcome by hyperactivation of the heregulin (HRG)/HER3 pathway. Here we describe an unbiased phenotypic combinatorial screening approach to identify a bispecific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody against HER2 and HER3. In tumor models resistant to HER2-targeting agents, the bispecific IgG1 potently inhibits the HRG/HER3 pathway and downstream PI3K/Akt signaling via a "dock & block" mechanism. This bispecific IgG1 is a potentially effective therapy for breast cancer and other tumors with hyperactivated HRG/HER3 signaling.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - (United Kingdom)

A Rapid and Precise Mutation-Activated Fluorescence Reporter for Analyzing Acute Mutagenesis Frequency.

  • Birnbaum MD
  • Cell Chem Biol
  • 2018 May 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mutagenesis reporters are critical for quantifying genome stability. However, current methods rely on cell survival/death to report mutation, which takes weeks and prevents evaluation of acute or time-dependent changes. Existing methods also have other limitations, such as cell type restrictions. Using our discovery that mCherryFP fluorescence depends on residue Trp98, we replaced this codon with a stop codon to generate a mutation biosensor (termed CherryOFF), with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) as an internal control. We found that the red fluorescence of this biosensor is activated by a specific A/T-G/C nucleotide transition. Compared with the established hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, our reporter has similar or better ability to detect changes of mutation frequency induced by physical/chemical mutagens or manipulation of mutation-related genes. Furthermore, CherryOFF-GFP can report mutagenesis independently of cell-death events, can be adapted to many cell types, and can generate readouts within 1 day for the measurement of acute or time-dependent events.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - DK056246(United States)

Rbfox1 Regulates Synaptic Transmission through the Inhibitory Neuron-Specific vSNARE Vamp1.

  • Vuong CK
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Apr 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dysfunction of the neuronal RNA binding protein RBFOX1 has been linked to epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders. Rbfox1 loss in mice leads to neuronal hyper-excitability and seizures, but the physiological basis for this is unknown. We identify the vSNARE protein Vamp1 as a major Rbfox1 target. Vamp1 is strongly downregulated in Rbfox1 Nes-cKO mice due to loss of 3' UTR binding by RBFOX1. Cytoplasmic Rbfox1 stimulates Vamp1 expression in part by blocking microRNA-9. We find that Vamp1 is specifically expressed in inhibitory neurons, and that both Vamp1 knockdown and Rbfox1 loss lead to decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission and E/I imbalance. Re-expression of Vamp1 selectively within interneurons rescues the electrophysiological changes in the Rbfox1 cKO, indicating that Vamp1 loss is a major contributor to the Rbfox1 Nes-cKO phenotype. The regulation of interneuron-specific Vamp1 by Rbfox1 provides a paradigm for broadly expressed RNA-binding proteins performing specialized functions in defined neuronal subtypes.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - DK094311(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM114463()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007185()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH060919()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R21 MH101684()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - F31 NS093923()

GPR68 Senses Flow and Is Essential for Vascular Physiology.

  • Xu J
  • Cell
  • 2018 Apr 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mechanotransduction plays a crucial role in vascular biology. One example of this is the local regulation of vascular resistance via flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Impairment of this process is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and a precursor to a wide array of vascular diseases, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Yet the molecules responsible for sensing flow (shear stress) within endothelial cells remain largely unknown. We designed a 384-well screening system that applies shear stress on cultured cells. We identified a mechanosensitive cell line that exhibits shear stress-activated calcium transients, screened a focused RNAi library, and identified GPR68 as necessary and sufficient for shear stress responses. GPR68 is expressed in endothelial cells of small-diameter (resistance) arteries. Importantly, Gpr68-deficient mice display markedly impaired acute FMD and chronic flow-mediated outward remodeling in mesenteric arterioles. Therefore, GPR68 is an essential flow sensor in arteriolar endothelium and is a critical signaling component in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - U24 CA126543(United States)

Single HIV-1 Imaging Reveals Progression of Infection through CA-Dependent Steps of Docking at the Nuclear Pore, Uncoating, and Nuclear Transport.

  • Francis AC
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2018 Apr 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

The HIV-1 core consists of capsid proteins (CA) surrounding viral genomic RNA. After virus-cell fusion, the core enters the cytoplasm and the capsid shell is lost through uncoating. CA loss precedes nuclear import and HIV integration into the host genome, but the timing and location of uncoating remain unclear. By visualizing single HIV-1 infection, we find that CA is required for core docking at the nuclear envelope (NE), whereas early uncoating in the cytoplasm promotes proteasomal degradation of viral complexes. Only docked cores exhibiting accelerated loss of CA at the NE enter the nucleus. Interestingly, a CA mutation (N74D) altering virus engagement of host factors involved in nuclear transport does not alter the uncoating site at the NE but reduces the nuclear penetration depth. Thus, CA protects HIV-1 complexes from degradation, mediates docking at the nuclear pore before uncoating, and determines the depth of nuclear penetration en route to integration.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA008748(United States)
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI129862()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM054787()

Dampened STING-Dependent Interferon Activation in Bats.

  • Xie J
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2018 Mar 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Compared with terrestrial mammals, bats have a longer lifespan and greater capacity to co-exist with a variety of viruses. In addition to cytosolic DNA generated by these viral infections, the metabolic demands of flight cause DNA damage and the release of self-DNA into the cytoplasm. However, whether bats have an altered DNA sensing/defense system to balance high cytosolic DNA levels remains an open question. We demonstrate that bats have a dampened interferon response due to the replacement of the highly conserved serine residue (S358) in STING, an essential adaptor protein in multiple DNA sensing pathways. Reversing this mutation by introducing S358 restored STING functionality, resulting in interferon activation and virus inhibition. Combined with previous reports on bat-specific changes of other DNA sensors such as TLR9, IFI16, and AIM2, our findings shed light on bat adaptation to flight, their long lifespan, and their unique capacity to serve as a virus reservoir.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS036232(United States)

A Neutralizing Antibody Recognizing Primarily N-Linked Glycan Targets the Silent Face of the HIV Envelope.

  • Zhou T
  • Immunity
  • 2018 Mar 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Virtually the entire surface of the HIV-1-envelope trimer is recognized by neutralizing antibodies, except for a highly glycosylated region at the center of the "silent face" on the gp120 subunit. From an HIV-1-infected donor, #74, we identified antibody VRC-PG05, which neutralized 27% of HIV-1 strains. The crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment of VRC-PG05 in complex with gp120 revealed an epitope comprised primarily of N-linked glycans from N262, N295, and N448 at the silent face center. Somatic hypermutation occurred preferentially at antibody residues that interacted with these glycans, suggesting somatic development of glycan recognition. Resistance to VRC-PG05 in donor #74 involved shifting of glycan-N448 to N446 or mutation of glycan-proximal residue E293. HIV-1 neutralization can thus be achieved at the silent face center by glycan-recognizing antibody; along with other known epitopes, the VRC-PG05 epitope completes coverage by neutralizing antibody of all major exposed regions of the prefusion closed trimer.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - MC_UP_1102/1(United Kingdom)
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI131722()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R21 AI108399()

Structural Basis of Formation of the Microtubule Minus-End-Regulating CAMSAP-Katanin Complex.

  • Jiang K
  • Structure
  • 2018 Mar 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

CAMSAP/Patronin family members regulate the organization and stability of microtubule minus ends in various systems ranging from mitotic spindles to differentiated epithelial cells and neurons. Mammalian CAMSAP2 and CAMSAP3 bind to growing microtubule minus ends, where they form stretches of stabilized microtubule lattice. The microtubule-severing ATPase katanin interacts with CAMSAPs and limits the length of CAMSAP-decorated microtubule stretches. Here, by using biochemical, biophysical, and structural approaches, we reveal that a short helical motif conserved in CAMSAP2 and CAMSAP3 binds to the heterodimer formed by the N- and C-terminal domains of katanin subunits p60 and p80, respectively. The identified CAMSAP-katanin binding mode is supported by mutational analysis and genome-editing experiments. It is strikingly similar to the one seen in the ASPM-katanin complex, which is responsible for microtubule minus-end regulation in mitotic spindles. Our work provides a general molecular mechanism for the cooperation of katanin with major microtubule minus-end regulators.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL70748(United States)

Neuropilin-2/PlexinA3 Receptors Associate with GluA1 and Mediate Sema3F-Dependent Homeostatic Scaling in Cortical Neurons.

  • Wang Q
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Dec 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) number at synapses is a major mechanism for controlling synaptic strength during homeostatic scaling in response to global changes in neural activity. We show that the secreted guidance cue semaphorin 3F (Sema3F) and its neuropilin-2 (Npn-2)/plexinA3 (PlexA3) holoreceptor mediate homeostatic plasticity in cortical neurons. Sema3F-Npn-2/PlexA3 signaling is essential for cell surface AMPAR homeostatic downscaling in response to an increase in neuronal activity, Npn-2 associates with AMPARs, and Sema3F regulates this interaction. Therefore, Sema3F-Npn-2/PlexA3 signaling controls both synapse development and synaptic plasticity.

Salt-inducible kinase 3 regulates the mammalian circadian clock by destabilizing PER2 protein.

  • Hayasaka N
  • Elife
  • 2017 Dec 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Salt-inducible kinase 3 (SIK3) plays a crucial role in various aspects of metabolism. In the course of investigating metabolic defects in Sik3-deficient mice (Sik3-/-), we observed that circadian rhythmicity of the metabolisms was phase-delayed. Sik3-/- mice also exhibited other circadian abnormalities, including lengthening of the period, impaired entrainment to the light-dark cycle, phase variation in locomotor activities, and aberrant physiological rhythms. Ex vivo suprachiasmatic nucleus slices from Sik3-/- mice exhibited destabilized and desynchronized molecular rhythms among individual neurons. In cultured cells, Sik3-knockdown resulted in abnormal bioluminescence rhythms. Expression levels of PER2, a clock protein, were elevated in Sik3-knockdown cells but down-regulated in Sik3-overexpressing cells, which could be attributed to a phosphorylation-dependent decrease in PER2 protein stability. This was further confirmed by PER2 accumulation in the Sik3-/- fibroblasts and liver. Collectively, SIK3 plays key roles in circadian rhythms by facilitating phosphorylation-dependent PER2 destabilization, either directly or indirectly.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - MR/K000608/1(United Kingdom)

Brain endothelial cells induce astrocytic expression of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 by a Notch-dependent mechanism.

  • Lee ML
  • J. Neurochem.
  • 2017 Dec 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neuron-secreted factors induce astrocytic expression of the glutamate transporter, GLT-1 (excitatory amino acid transporter 2). In addition to their elaborate anatomic relationships with neurons, astrocytes also have processes that extend to and envelop the vasculature. Although previous studies have demonstrated that brain endothelia contribute to astrocyte differentiation and maturation, the effects of brain endothelia on astrocytic expression of GLT-1 have not been examined. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that endothelia induce expression of GLT-1 by co-culturing astrocytes from mice that utilize non-coding elements of the GLT-1 gene to control expression of reporter proteins with the mouse endothelial cell line, bEND.3. We found that endothelia increased steady state levels of reporter and GLT-1 mRNA/protein. Co-culturing with primary rat brain endothelia also increases reporter protein, GLT-1 protein, and GLT-1-mediated glutamate uptake. The Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, bone morphogenic protein/transforming growth factor β, and nitric oxide pathways have been implicated in endothelia-to-astrocyte signaling; we provide multiple lines of evidence that none of these pathways mediate the effects of endothelia on astrocytic GLT-1 expression. Using transwells with a semi-permeable membrane, we demonstrate that the effects of the bEND.3 cell line are dependent upon contact. Notch has also been implicated in endothelia-astrocyte signaling in vitro and in vivo. The first step of Notch signaling requires cleavage of Notch intracellular domain by γ-secretase. We demonstrate that the γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester blocks endothelia-induced increases in GLT-1. We show that the levels of Notch intracellular domain are higher in nuclei of astrocytes co-cultured with endothelia, an effect also blocked by N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester. Finally, infection of co-cultures with shRNA directed against recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J, a Notch effector, also reduces endothelia-dependent increases in enhanced green fluorescent protein and GLT-1. Together, these studies support a novel role for Notch in endothelia-dependent induction of GLT-1 expression. Cover Image for this issue: doi. 10.1111/jnc.13825.

Tumor-Suppressor Inactivation of GDF11 Occurs by Precursor Sequestration in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

  • Bajikar SS
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Nov 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive and heterogeneous carcinoma in which various tumor-suppressor genes are lost by mutation, deletion, or silencing. Here we report a tumor-suppressive mode of action for growth-differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) and an unusual mechanism of its inactivation in TNBC. GDF11 promotes an epithelial, anti-invasive phenotype in 3D triple-negative cultures and intraductal xenografts by sustaining expression of E-cadherin and inhibitor of differentiation 2 (ID2). Surprisingly, clinical TNBCs retain the GDF11 locus and expression of the protein itself. GDF11 bioactivity is instead lost because of deficiencies in its convertase, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 5 (PCSK5), causing inactive GDF11 precursor to accumulate intracellularly. PCSK5 reconstitution mobilizes the latent TNBC reservoir of GDF11 in vitro and suppresses triple-negative mammary cancer metastasis to the lung of syngeneic hosts. Intracellular GDF11 retention adds to the concept of tumor-suppressor inactivation and reveals a cell-biological vulnerability for TNBCs lacking therapeutically actionable mutations.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC011184(United States)

Amyloid Beta Peptides Block New Synapse Assembly by Nogo Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of T-Type Calcium Channels.

  • Zhao Y
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Oct 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Compelling evidence links amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide accumulation in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with the emergence of learning and memory deficits, yet a clear understanding of the events that drive this synaptic pathology are lacking. We present evidence that neurons exposed to Aβ are unable to form new synapses, resulting in learning deficits in vivo. We demonstrate the Nogo receptor family (NgR1-3) acts as Aβ receptors mediating an inhibition of synapse assembly, plasticity, and learning. Live imaging studies reveal Aβ activates NgRs on the dendritic shaft of neurons, triggering an inhibition of calcium signaling. We define T-type calcium channels as a target of Aβ-NgR signaling, mediating Aβ's inhibitory effects on calcium, synapse assembly, plasticity, and learning. These studies highlight deficits in new synapse assembly as a potential initiator of cognitive pathology in AD, and pinpoint calcium dysregulation mediated by NgRs and T-type channels as key components. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R21 MH107966()

Restoration of Replication Fork Stability in BRCA1- and BRCA2-Deficient Cells by Inactivation of SNF2-Family Fork Remodelers.

  • Taglialatela A
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

To ensure the completion of DNA replication and maintenance of genome integrity, DNA repair factors protect stalled replication forks upon replication stress. Previous studies have identified a critical role for the tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2 in preventing the degradation of nascent DNA by the MRE11 nuclease after replication stress. Here we show that depletion of SMARCAL1, a SNF2-family DNA translocase that remodels stalled forks, restores replication fork stability and reduces the formation of replication stress-induced DNA breaks and chromosomal aberrations in BRCA1/2-deficient cells. In addition to SMARCAL1, other SNF2-family fork remodelers, including ZRANB3 and HLTF, cause nascent DNA degradation and genomic instability in BRCA1/2-deficient cells upon replication stress. Our observations indicate that nascent DNA degradation in BRCA1/2-deficient cells occurs as a consequence of MRE11-dependent nucleolytic processing of reversed forks generated by fork remodelers. These studies provide mechanistic insights into the processes that cause genome instability in BRCA1/2-deficient cells.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA197774()

A Potent Germline-like Human Monoclonal Antibody Targets a pH-Sensitive Epitope on H7N9 Influenza Hemagglutinin.

  • Yu F
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2017 Oct 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

The H7N9 influenza virus causes high-mortality disease in humans but no effective therapeutics are available. Here we report a human monoclonal antibody, m826, that binds to H7 hemagglutinin (HA) and protects against H7N9 infection. m826 binds to H7N9 HA with subnanomolar affinity at acidic pH and 10-fold lower affinity at neutral pH. The high-resolution (1.9 Å) crystal structure of m826 complexed with H7N9 HA indicates that m826 binds an epitope that may be fully exposed upon pH-induced conformational changes in HA. m826 fully protects mice against lethal challenge with H7N9 virus through mechanisms likely involving antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, immunogenetic analysis indicates that m826 is a germline antibody, and m826-like sequences can be identified in H7N9-infected patients, healthy adults, and newborn babies. These m826 properties offer a template for H7N9 vaccine immunogens, a promising candidate therapeutic, and a tool for exploring mechanisms of virus infection inhibition by antibodies.

Tetherin Suppresses Type I Interferon Signaling by Targeting MAVS for NDP52-Mediated Selective Autophagic Degradation in Human Cells.

  • Jin S
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Tetherin (BST2/CD317) is an interferon-inducible antiviral factor known for its ability to block the release of enveloped viruses from infected cells. Yet its role in type I interferon (IFN) signaling remains poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that Tetherin is a negative regulator of RIG-I like receptor (RLR)-mediated type I IFN signaling by targeting MAVS. The induction of Tetherin by type I IFN accelerates MAVS degradation via ubiquitin-dependent selective autophagy in human cells. Moreover, Tetherin recruits E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH8 to catalyze K27-linked ubiquitin chains on MAVS at lysine 7, which serves as a recognition signal for NDP52-dependent autophagic degradation. Taken together, our findings reveal a negative feedback loop of RLR signaling generated by Tetherin-MARCH8-MAVS-NDP52 axis and provide insights into a better understanding of the crosstalk between selective autophagy and optimal deactivation of type I IFN signaling.

NLRP3 Phosphorylation Is an Essential Priming Event for Inflammasome Activation.

  • Song N
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Many infections and stress signals can rapidly activate the NLRP3 inflammasome to elicit robust inflammatory responses. This activation requires a priming step, which is thought to be mainly for upregulating NLRP3 transcription. However, recent studies report that the NLRP3 inflammasome can be activated independently of transcription, suggesting that the priming process has unknown essential regulatory steps. Here, we report that JNK1-mediated NLRP3 phosphorylation at S194 is a critical priming event and is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We show that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is disrupted in NLRP3-S194A knockin mice. JNK1-mediated NLRP3 S194 phosphorylation is critical for NLRP3 deubiquitination and facilitates its self-association and the subsequent inflammasome assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that blocking S194 phosphorylation prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Thus, our study reveals a key priming molecular event that is a prerequisite for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Inhibiting NLRP3 phosphorylation could be an effective treatment for NLRP3-related diseases.

A Peptide Encoded by a Putative lncRNA HOXB-AS3 Suppresses Colon Cancer Growth.

  • Huang JZ
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

A substantial fraction of eukaryotic transcripts are considered long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which regulate various hallmarks of cancer. Here, we discovered that the lncRNA HOXB-AS3 encodes a conserved 53-aa peptide. The HOXB-AS3 peptide, not lncRNA, suppresses colon cancer (CRC) growth. Mechanistically, the HOXB-AS3 peptide competitively binds to the ariginine residues in RGG motif of hnRNP A1 and antagonizes the hnRNP A1-mediated regulation of pyruvate kinase M (PKM) splicing by blocking the binding of the ariginine residues in RGG motif of hnRNP A1 to the sequences flanking PKM exon 9, ensuring the formation of lower PKM2 and suppressing glucose metabolism reprogramming. CRC patients with low levels of HOXB-AS3 peptide have poorer prognoses. Our study indicates that the loss of HOXB-AS3 peptide is a critical oncogenic event in CRC metabolic reprogramming. Our findings uncover a complex regulatory mechanism of cancer metabolism reprogramming orchestrated by a peptide encoded by an lncRNA.

RAN Translation Regulated by Muscleblind Proteins in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2.

  • Zu T
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Sep 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

Several microsatellite-expansion diseases are characterized by the accumulation of RNA foci and RAN proteins, raising the possibility of a mechanistic connection. We explored this question using myotonic dystrophy type 2, a multisystemic disease thought to be primarily caused by RNA gain-of-function effects. We demonstrate that the DM2 CCTG⋅CAGG expansion expresses sense and antisense tetrapeptide poly-(LPAC) and poly-(QAGR) RAN proteins, respectively. In DM2 autopsy brains, LPAC is found in neurons, astrocytes, and glia in gray matter, and antisense QAGR proteins accumulate within white matter. LPAC and QAGR proteins are toxic to cells independent of RNA gain of function. RNA foci and nuclear sequestration of CCUG transcripts by MBNL1 is inversely correlated with LPAC expression. These data suggest a model that involves nuclear retention of expansion RNAs by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and an acute phase in which expansion RNAs exceed RBP sequestration capacity, are exported to the cytoplasm, and undergo RAN translation. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

Epitranscriptomic Enhancement of Influenza A Virus Gene Expression and Replication.

  • Courtney DG
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2017 Sep 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

Many viral RNAs are modified by methylation of the N6 position of adenosine (m6A). m6A is thought to regulate RNA splicing, stability, translation, and secondary structure. Influenza A virus (IAV) expresses m6A-modified RNAs, but the effects of m6A on this segmented RNA virus remain unclear. We demonstrate that global inhibition of m6A addition inhibits IAV gene expression and replication. In contrast, overexpression of the cellular m6A "reader" protein YTHDF2 increases IAV gene expression and replication. To address whether m6A residues modulate IAV RNA function in cis, we mapped m6A residues on the IAV plus (mRNA) and minus (vRNA) strands and used synonymous mutations to ablate m6A on both strands of the hemagglutinin (HA) segment. These mutations inhibited HA mRNA and protein expression while leaving other IAV mRNAs and proteins unaffected, and they also resulted in reduced IAV pathogenicity in mice. Thus, m6A residues in IAV transcripts enhance viral gene expression.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - T32 CA009111()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R21 AI130574()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007184()

CRISPR-Mediated Base Editing Enables Efficient Disruption of Eukaryotic Genes through Induction of STOP Codons.

  • Billon P
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Sep 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Standard CRISPR-mediated gene disruption strategies rely on Cas9-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we show that CRISPR-dependent base editing efficiently inactivates genes by precisely converting four codons (CAA, CAG, CGA, and TGG) into STOP codons without DSB formation. To facilitate gene inactivation by induction of STOP codons (iSTOP), we provide access to a database of over 3.4 million single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for iSTOP (sgSTOPs) targeting 97%-99% of genes in eight eukaryotic species, and we describe a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay that allows the rapid detection of iSTOP-mediated editing in cell populations and clones. To simplify the selection of sgSTOPs, our resource includes annotations for off-target propensity, percentage of isoforms targeted, prediction of nonsense-mediated decay, and restriction enzymes for RFLP analysis. Additionally, our database includes sgSTOPs that could be employed to precisely model over 32,000 cancer-associated nonsense mutations. Altogether, this work provides a comprehensive resource for DSB-free gene disruption by iSTOP.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA197774()
  • NCI NIH HHS - T32 CA009503()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM117064()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R35 GM118180()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM008798()

A Brucella Type IV Effector Targets the COG Tethering Complex to Remodel Host Secretory Traffic and Promote Intracellular Replication.

  • Miller CN
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2017 Sep 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

Many intracellular pathogens exploit host secretory trafficking to support their intracellular cycle, but knowledge of these pathogenic processes is limited. The bacterium Brucella abortus uses a type IV secretion system (VirB T4SS) to generate a replication-permissive Brucella-containing vacuole (rBCV) derived from the host ER, a process that requires host early secretory trafficking. Here we show that the VirB T4SS effector BspB contributes to rBCV biogenesis and Brucella replication by interacting with the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) tethering complex, a major coordinator of Golgi vesicular trafficking, thus remodeling Golgi membrane traffic and redirecting Golgi-derived vesicles to the BCV. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that Brucella modulates COG-dependent trafficking via delivery of a T4SS effector to promote rBCV biogenesis and intracellular proliferation, providing mechanistic insight into how bacterial exploitation of host secretory functions promotes pathogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI129992()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R21 AI112649()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - T32 AI007025()

Centriole triplet microtubules are required for stable centriole formation and inheritance in human cells.

  • Wang JT
  • Elife
  • 2017 Sep 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Centrioles are composed of long-lived microtubules arranged in nine triplets. However, the contribution of triplet microtubules to mammalian centriole formation and stability is unknown. Little is known of the mechanism of triplet microtubule formation, but experiments in unicellular eukaryotes indicate that delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin, two less-studied tubulin family members, are required. Here, we report that centrioles in delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin null mutant human cells lack triplet microtubules and fail to undergo centriole maturation. These aberrant centrioles are formed de novo each cell cycle, but are unstable and do not persist to the next cell cycle, leading to a futile cycle of centriole formation and disintegration. Disintegration can be suppressed by paclitaxel treatment. Delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin physically interact, indicating that these tubulins act together to maintain triplet microtubules and that these are necessary for inheritance of centrioles from one cell cycle to the next.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI038382(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - F32 GM117678()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM052022()

Systematic Identification of MCU Modulators by Orthogonal Interspecies Chemical Screening.

  • Arduino DM
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Aug 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

The mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex is essential for calcium (Ca2+) uptake into mitochondria of all mammalian tissues, where it regulates bioenergetics, cell death, and Ca2+ signal transduction. Despite its involvement in several human diseases, we currently lack pharmacological agents for targeting uniporter activity. Here we introduce a high-throughput assay that selects for human MCU-specific small-molecule modulators in primary drug screens. Using isolated yeast mitochondria, reconstituted with human MCU, its essential regulator EMRE, and aequorin, and exploiting a D-lactate- and mannitol/sucrose-based bioenergetic shunt that greatly minimizes false-positive hits, we identify mitoxantrone out of more than 600 clinically approved drugs as a direct selective inhibitor of human MCU. We validate mitoxantrone in orthogonal mammalian cell-based assays, demonstrating that our screening approach is an effective and robust tool for MCU-specific drug discovery and, more generally, for the identification of compounds that target mitochondrial functions.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - P50 MH090963(United States)

Argonaute CLIP Defines a Deregulated miR-122-Bound Transcriptome that Correlates with Patient Survival in Human Liver Cancer.

  • Luna JM
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Aug 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

MicroRNA-122, an abundant and conserved liver-specific miRNA, regulates hepatic metabolism and functions as a tumor suppressor, yet systematic and direct biochemical elucidation of the miR-122 target network remains incomplete. To this end, we performed Argonaute crosslinking immunoprecipitation (Argonaute [Ago]-CLIP) sequencing in miR-122 knockout and control mouse livers, as well as in matched human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and benign liver tissue to identify miRNA target sites transcriptome-wide in two species. We observed a majority of miR-122 binding on 3' UTRs and coding exons followed by extensive binding to other genic and non-genic sites. Motif analysis of miR-122-dependent binding revealed a G-bulged motif in addition to canonical motifs. A large number of miR-122 targets were found to be species specific. Upregulation of several common mouse and human targets, most notably BCL9, predicted survival in HCC patients. These results broadly define the molecular consequences of miR-122 downregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma.

GCL and CUL3 Control the Switch between Cell Lineages by Mediating Localized Degradation of an RTK.

  • Pae J
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Jul 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

The separation of germline from somatic lineages is fundamental to reproduction and species preservation. Here, we show that Drosophila Germ cell-less (GCL) is a critical component in this process by acting as a switch that turns off a somatic lineage pathway. GCL, a conserved BTB (Broad-complex, Tramtrack, and Bric-a-brac) protein, is a substrate-specific adaptor for Cullin3-RING ubiquitin ligase complex (CRL3GCL). We show that CRL3GCL promotes PGC fate by mediating degradation of Torso, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and major determinant of somatic cell fate. This mode of RTK degradation does not depend upon receptor activation but is prompted by release of GCL from the nuclear envelope during mitosis. The cell-cycle-dependent change in GCL localization provides spatiotemporal specificity for RTK degradation and sequesters CRL3GCL to prevent it from participating in excessive activities. This precisely orchestrated mechanism of CRL3GCL function and regulation defines cell fate at the single-cell level.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA076584()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R37 CA076584()
  • NCI NIH HHS - T32 CA160002()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R01 HD041900()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R37 HD041900()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM057587()
  • NIH HHS - P40 OD018537()

The RNA Surveillance Factor UPF1 Represses Myogenesis via Its E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity.

  • Feng Q
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Jul 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

UPF1 is an RNA helicase that orchestrates nonsense-mediated decay and other RNA surveillance pathways. While UPF1 is best known for its basal cytoprotective role in degrading aberrant RNAs, UPF1 also degrades specific, normally occurring mRNAs to regulate diverse cellular processes. Here we describe a role for UPF1 in regulated protein decay, wherein UPF1 acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to repress human skeletal muscle differentiation. Suppressing UPF1 accelerates myogenesis, while ectopically increasing UPF1 levels slows myogenesis. UPF1 promotes the decay of MYOD protein, a transcription factor that is a master regulator of myogenesis, while leaving MYOD mRNA stability unaffected. UPF1 acts as an E3 ligase via its RING domain to promote MYOD protein ubiquitination and degradation. Our data characterize a regulatory role for UPF1 in myogenesis, and they demonstrate that UPF1 provides a mechanistic link between the RNA and protein decay machineries in human cells.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - P01 NS069539()

DGAT1-Dependent Lipid Droplet Biogenesis Protects Mitochondrial Function during Starvation-Induced Autophagy.

  • Nguyen TB
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Jul 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Lipid droplets (LDs) provide an "on-demand" source of fatty acids (FAs) that can be mobilized in response to fluctuations in nutrient abundance. Surprisingly, the amount of LDs increases during prolonged periods of nutrient deprivation. Why cells store FAs in LDs during an energy crisis is unknown. Our data demonstrate that mTORC1-regulated autophagy is necessary and sufficient for starvation-induced LD biogenesis. The ER-resident diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) selectively channels autophagy-liberated FAs into new, clustered LDs that are in close proximity to mitochondria and are lipolytically degraded. However, LDs are not required for FA delivery to mitochondria but instead function to prevent acylcarnitine accumulation and lipotoxic dysregulation of mitochondria. Our data support a model in which LDs provide a lipid buffering system that sequesters FAs released during the autophagic degradation of membranous organelles, reducing lipotoxicity. These findings reveal an unrecognized aspect of the cellular adaptive response to starvation, mediated by LDs.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R00 DK095921()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM112948()

Reduced Expression of Foxp1 as a Contributing Factor in Huntington's Disease.

  • Louis Sam Titus ASC
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Jul 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntington protein (htt). The neuropathological hallmark of HD is the loss of neurons in the striatum and, to a lesser extent, in the cortex. Foxp1 is a member of the Forkhead family of transcription factors expressed selectively in the striatum and the cortex. In the brain, three major Foxp1 isoforms are expressed: isoform-A (∼90 kDa), isoform-D (∼70 kDa), and isoform-C (∼50 kDa). We find that expression of Foxp1 isoform-A and -D is selectively reduced in the striatum and cortex of R6/2 HD mice as well as in the striatum of HD patients. Furthermore, expression of mutant htt in neurons results in the downregulation of Foxp1 Elevating expression of isoform-A or -D protects cortical neurons from death caused by the expression of mutant htt On the other hand, knockdown of Foxp1 promotes death in otherwise healthy neurons. Neuroprotection by Foxp1 is likely to be mediated by the transcriptional stimulation of the cell-cycle inhibitory protein p21Waf1/Cip1 Consistently, Foxp1 activates transcription of the p21Waf1/Cip1 gene promoter, and overexpression of Foxp1 in neurons results in the elevation of p21 expression. Moreover, knocking down of p21Waf1/Cip1 blocks the ability of Foxp1 to protect neurons from mut-Htt-induced neurotoxicity. We propose that the selective vulnerability of neurons of the striatum and cortex in HD is related to the loss of expression of Foxp1, a protein that is highly expressed in these neurons and required for their survival.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although the mutant huntingtin gene is expressed widely, neurons of the striatum and cortex are selectively affected in Huntington's disease (HD). Our results suggest that this selectivity is attributable to the reduced expression of Foxp1, a protein expressed selectively in striatal and cortical neurons that plays a neuroprotective role in these cells. We show that protection by Foxp1 involves stimulation of the p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a) gene. Although three major Foxp1 isoforms (A, C, and D) are expressed in the brain, only isoform-A has been studied in the nervous system. We show that isoform-D is also expressed selectively, neuroprotective and downregulated in HD mice and patients. Our results suggest that Foxp1 might be an attractive therapeutic target for HD.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS040408()

HIV-1-Mediated Downmodulation of HLA-C Impacts Target Cell Recognition and Antiviral Activity of NK Cells.

  • Körner C
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2017 Jul 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

It was widely accepted that HIV-1 downregulates HLA-A/B to avoid CTL recognition while leaving HLA-C unaltered in order to prevent NK cell activation by engaging inhibitory NK cell receptors, but it was recently observed that most primary isolates of HIV-1 can mediate HLA-C downmodulation. Now we report that HIV-1-mediated downmodulation of HLA-C was associated with reduced binding to its respective inhibitory receptors. Despite this, HLA-C-licensed NK cells displayed reduced antiviral activity compared to their unlicensed counterparts, potentially due to residual binding to the respective inhibitory receptors. Nevertheless, NK cells were able to sense alterations of HLA-C expression demonstrated by increased antiviral activity when exposed to viral strains with differential abilities to downmodulate HLA-C. These results suggest that the capability of HLA-C-licensed NK cells to control HIV-1 replication is determined by the strength of KIR/HLA-C interactions and is thus dependent on both host genetics and the extent of virus-mediated HLA-C downregulation.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI067031()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI116363()

A Splice Variant of Centrosomin Converts Mitochondria to Microtubule-Organizing Centers.

  • Chen JV
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 Jul 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Non-centrosomal microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) direct microtubule (MT) organization to exert diverse cell-type-specific functions. In Drosophila spermatids, the giant mitochondria provide structural platforms for MT reorganization to support elongation of the extremely long sperm. However, the molecular basis for this mitochondrial MTOC and other non-centrosomal MTOCs has not been discerned. Here we report that Drosophila centrosomin (cnn) expresses two major protein variants: the centrosomal form (CnnC) and a non-centrosomal form in testes (CnnT). CnnC is established as essential for functional centrosomes, the major MTOCs in animal cells. We show that CnnT is expressed exclusively in testes by alternative splicing and localizes to giant mitochondria in spermatids. In cell culture, CnnT targets to the mitochondrial surface, recruits the MT nucleator γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), and is sufficient to convert mitochondria to MTOCs independent of core pericentriolar proteins that regulate MT assembly at centrosomes. We mapped two separate domains in CnnT: one that is necessary and sufficient to target it to mitochondria and another that is necessary and sufficient to recruit γ-TuRCs and nucleate MTs. In elongating spermatids, CnnT forms speckles on the giant mitochondria that are required to recruit γ-TuRCs to organize MTs and support spermiogenesis. This molecular characterization of the mitochondrial MTOC defines a minimal molecular requirement for MTOC generation and implicates the potent role of Cnn (or its related) proteins in the direct regulation of MT assembly and organization of non-centrosomal MTOCs.

The complex of TRIP-Br1 and XIAP ubiquitinates and degrades multiple adenylyl cyclase isoforms.

  • Hu W
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jun 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) generate cAMP, a second messenger of utmost importance that regulates a vast array of biological processes in all kingdoms of life. However, almost nothing is known about how AC activity is regulated through protein degradation mediated by ubiquitination or other mechanisms. Here, we show that transcriptional regulator interacting with the PHD-bromodomain 1 (TRIP-Br1, Sertad1), a newly identified protein with poorly characterized functions, acts as an adaptor that bridges the interaction of multiple AC isoforms with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), a RING-domain E3 ubiquitin ligase. XIAP ubiquitinates a highly conserved Lys residue in AC isoforms and thereby accelerates the endocytosis and degradation of multiple AC isoforms in human cell lines and mice. XIAP/TRIP-Br1-mediated degradation of ACs forms part of a negative-feedback loop that controls the homeostasis of cAMP signaling in mice. Our findings reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism for degrading multiple AC isoforms and modulating the homeostasis of cAMP signaling.

Human Virus-Derived Small RNAs Can Confer Antiviral Immunity in Mammals.

  • Qiu Y
  • Immunity
  • 2017 Jun 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

RNA interference (RNAi) functions as a potent antiviral immunity in plants and invertebrates; however, whether RNAi plays antiviral roles in mammals remains unclear. Here, using human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) as a model, we showed HEV71 3A protein as an authentic viral suppressor of RNAi during viral infection. When the 3A-mediated RNAi suppression was impaired, the mutant HEV71 readily triggered the production of abundant HEV71-derived small RNAs with canonical siRNA properties in cells and mice. These virus-derived siRNAs were produced from viral dsRNA replicative intermediates in a Dicer-dependent manner and loaded into AGO, and they were fully active in degrading cognate viral RNAs. Recombinant HEV71 deficient in 3A-mediated RNAi suppression was significantly restricted in human somatic cells and mice, whereas Dicer deficiency rescued HEV71 infection independently of type I interferon response. Thus, RNAi can function as an antiviral immunity, which is induced and suppressed by a human virus, in mammals.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R01 HD053855(United States)

A Metabolic Function for Phospholipid and Histone Methylation.

  • Ye C
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is the methyl donor for biological methylation modifications that regulate protein and nucleic acid functions. Here, we show that methylation of a phospholipid, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), is a major consumer of SAM. The induction of phospholipid biosynthetic genes is accompanied by induction of the enzyme that hydrolyzes S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), a product and inhibitor of methyltransferases. Beyond its function for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the methylation of PE facilitates the turnover of SAM for the synthesis of cysteine and glutathione through transsulfuration. Strikingly, cells that lack PE methylation accumulate SAM, which leads to hypermethylation of histones and the major phosphatase PP2A, dependency on cysteine, and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Without PE methylation, particular sites on histones then become methyl sinks to enable the conversion of SAM to SAH. These findings reveal an unforeseen metabolic function for phospholipid and histone methylation intrinsic to the life of a cell.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA142543()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM094314()

Mutation of the Human Circadian Clock Gene CRY1 in Familial Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder.

  • Patke A
  • Cell
  • 2017 Apr 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Patterns of daily human activity are controlled by an intrinsic circadian clock that promotes ∼24 hr rhythms in many behavioral and physiological processes. This system is altered in delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD), a common form of insomnia in which sleep episodes are shifted to later times misaligned with the societal norm. Here, we report a hereditary form of DSPD associated with a dominant coding variation in the core circadian clock gene CRY1, which creates a transcriptional inhibitor with enhanced affinity for circadian activator proteins Clock and Bmal1. This gain-of-function CRY1 variant causes reduced expression of key transcriptional targets and lengthens the period of circadian molecular rhythms, providing a mechanistic link to DSPD symptoms. The allele has a frequency of up to 0.6%, and reverse phenotyping of unrelated families corroborates late and/or fragmented sleep patterns in carriers, suggesting that it affects sleep behavior in a sizeable portion of the human population.

Funding information:
  • NCATS NIH HHS - UL1 TR000043()
  • NCATS NIH HHS - UL1 TR001866()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS052495()

Kinetics of Endogenous CaMKII Required for Synaptic Plasticity Revealed by Optogenetic Kinase Inhibitor.

  • Murakoshi H
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Apr 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Elucidating temporal windows of signaling activity required for synaptic and behavioral plasticity is crucial for understanding molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena. Here, we developed photoactivatable autocamtide inhibitory peptide 2 (paAIP2), a genetically encoded, light-inducible inhibitor of CaMKII activity. The photoactivation of paAIP2 in neurons for 1-2 min during the induction of LTP and structural LTP (sLTP) of dendritic spines inhibited these forms of plasticity in hippocampal slices of rodents. However, photoactivation ∼1 min after the induction did not affect them, suggesting that the initial 1 min of CaMKII activation is sufficient for inducing LTP and sLTP. Furthermore, the photoactivation of paAIP2 expressed in amygdalar neurons of mice during an inhibitory avoidance task revealed that CaMKII activity during, but not after, training is required for the memory formation. Thus, we demonstrated that paAIP2 is useful to elucidate the temporal window of CaMKII activation required for synaptic plasticity and learning.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH080047()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH111486()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - DP1 NS096787()

CLASP2 Links Reelin to the Cytoskeleton during Neocortical Development.

  • Dillon GM
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Mar 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

The Reelin signaling pathway plays a crucial role in regulating neocortical development. However, little is known about how Reelin controls the cytoskeleton during neuronal migration. Here, we identify CLASP2 as a key cytoskeletal effector in the Reelin signaling pathway. We demonstrate that CLASP2 has distinct roles during neocortical development regulating neuron production and controlling neuron migration, polarity, and morphogenesis. We found downregulation of CLASP2 in migrating neurons leads to mislocalized cells in deeper cortical layers, abnormal positioning of the centrosome-Golgi complex, and aberrant length/orientation of the leading process. We discovered that Reelin regulates several phosphorylation sites within the positively charged serine/arginine-rich region that constitute consensus GSK3β phosphorylation motifs of CLASP2. Furthermore, phosphorylation of CLASP2 regulates its interaction with the Reelin adaptor Dab1 and this association is required for CLASP2 effects on neurite extension and motility. Together, our data reveal that CLASP2 is an essential Reelin effector orchestrating cytoskeleton dynamics during brain development.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R21 MH100581()

Synaptic transmission and plasticity require AMPA receptor anchoring via its N-terminal domain.

  • Watson JF
  • Elife
  • 2017 Mar 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and are selectively recruited during activity-dependent plasticity to increase synaptic strength. A prerequisite for faithful signal transmission is the positioning and clustering of AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. The mechanisms underlying this positioning have largely been ascribed to the receptor cytoplasmic C-termini and to AMPAR-associated auxiliary subunits, both interacting with the postsynaptic scaffold. Here, using mouse organotypic hippocampal slices, we show that the extracellular AMPAR N-terminal domain (NTD), which projects midway into the synaptic cleft, plays a fundamental role in this process. This highly sequence-diverse domain mediates synaptic anchoring in a subunit-selective manner. Receptors lacking the NTD exhibit increased mobility in synapses, depress synaptic transmission and are unable to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, synaptic transmission and the expression of LTP are dependent upon an AMPAR anchoring mechanism that is driven by the NTD.

A Novel Human CAMK2A Mutation Disrupts Dendritic Morphology and Synaptic Transmission, and Causes ASD-Related Behaviors.

  • Stephenson JR
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Feb 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Characterizing the functional impact of novel mutations linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) provides a deeper mechanistic understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Here we show that a de novo Glu183 to Val (E183V) mutation in the CaMKIIα catalytic domain, identified in a proband diagnosed with ASD, decreases both CaMKIIα substrate phosphorylation and regulatory autophosphorylation, and that the mutated kinase acts in a dominant-negative manner to reduce CaMKIIα-WT autophosphorylation. The E183V mutation also reduces CaMKIIα binding to established ASD-linked proteins, such as Shank3 and subunits of l-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors, and increases CaMKIIα turnover in intact cells. In cultured neurons, the E183V mutation reduces CaMKIIα targeting to dendritic spines. Moreover, neuronal expression of CaMKIIα-E183V increases dendritic arborization and decreases both dendritic spine density and excitatory synaptic transmission. Mice with a knock-in CaMKIIα-E183V mutation have lower total forebrain CaMKIIα levels, with reduced targeting to synaptic subcellular fractions. The CaMKIIα-E183V mice also display aberrant behavioral phenotypes, including hyperactivity, social interaction deficits, and increased repetitive behaviors. Together, these data suggest that CaMKIIα plays a previously unappreciated role in ASD-related synaptic and behavioral phenotypes.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-linked mutations disrupt the function of synaptic proteins, but no single gene accounts for >1% of total ASD cases. The molecular networks and mechanisms that couple the primary deficits caused by these individual mutations to core behavioral symptoms of ASD remain poorly understood. Here, we provide the first characterization of a mutation in the gene encoding CaMKIIα linked to a specific neuropsychiatric disorder. Our findings demonstrate that this ASD-linked de novo CAMK2A mutation disrupts multiple CaMKII functions, induces synaptic deficits, and causes ASD-related behavioral alterations, providing novel insights into the synaptic mechanisms contributing to ASD.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA068485()
  • NEI NIH HHS - P30 EY008126()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - U54 HD083211()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK020593()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK058404()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P60 DK020593()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - U24 DK059637()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - P41 GM103311()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - F31 MH109196()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - K01 MH107765()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH063232()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - T32 MH065215()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS078291()

A Rapid Induction Mechanism for Lin28a in Trophic Responses.

  • Amen AM
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Feb 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Environmental cues provoke rapid transitions in gene expression to support growth and cellular plasticity through incompletely understood mechanisms. Lin28 RNA-binding proteins have evolutionarily conserved roles in post-transcriptional coordination of pro-growth gene expression, but signaling pathways allowing trophic stimuli to induce Lin28 have remained uncharacterized. We find that Lin28a protein exhibits rapid basal turnover in neurons and that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of the RNA-silencing factor HIV TAR-RNA-binding protein (TRBP) promotes binding and stabilization of Lin28a, but not Lin28b, with an accompanying reduction in Lin28-regulated miRNAs, downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Binding of Lin28a to TRBP in vitro is also enhanced by phospho-mimic TRBP. Further, phospho-TRBP recapitulates BDNF-induced neuronal dendritic spine growth in a Lin28a-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate MAPK-dependent TRBP and Lin28a induction, with physiological function in growth and survival, downstream of diverse growth factors in multiple primary cell types, supporting a broad role for this pathway in trophic responses.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - F31 MH103902()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH098016()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH109341()

Epigenetic Activation of WNT5A Drives Glioblastoma Stem Cell Differentiation and Invasive Growth.

  • Hu B
  • Cell
  • 2016 Nov 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) are implicated in tumor neovascularization, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. To illuminate mechanisms governing these hallmark features, we developed a de novo glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) model derived from immortalized human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSCs) to enable precise system-level comparisons of pre-malignant and oncogene-induced malignant states of NSCs. Integrated transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses uncovered a PAX6/DLX5 transcriptional program driving WNT5A-mediated GSC differentiation into endothelial-like cells (GdECs). GdECs recruit existing endothelial cells to promote peritumoral satellite lesions, which serve as a niche supporting the growth of invasive glioma cells away from the primary tumor. Clinical data reveal higher WNT5A and GdECs expression in peritumoral and recurrent GBMs relative to matched intratumoral and primary GBMs, respectively, supporting WNT5A-mediated GSC differentiation and invasive growth in disease recurrence. Thus, the PAX6/DLX5-WNT5A axis governs the diffuse spread of glioma cells throughout the brain parenchyma, contributing to the lethality of GBM.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R56 NS094589(United States)

Replacing the PDZ-interacting C-termini of DSCAM and DSCAML1 with epitope tags causes different phenotypic severity in different cell populations.

  • Garrett AM
  • Elife
  • 2016 Sep 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Different types of neurons in the retina are organized vertically into layers and horizontally in a mosaic pattern that helps ensure proper neural network formation and information processing throughout the visual field. The vertebrate Dscams (DSCAM and DSCAML1) are cell adhesion molecules that support the development of this organization by promoting self-avoidance at the level of cell types, promoting normal developmental cell death, and directing vertical neurite stratification. To understand the molecular interactions required for these activities, we tested the functional significance of the interaction between the C-terminus of the Dscams and multi-PDZ domain-containing scaffolding proteins in mouse. We hypothesized that this PDZ-interacting domain would mediate a subset of the Dscams' functions. Instead, we found that in the absence of these interactions, some cell types developed almost normally, while others resembled complete loss of function. Thus, we show differential dependence on this domain for Dscams' functions in different cell types.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - DK046367(United States)

Cell-Type-Specific Alternative Splicing Governs Cell Fate in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

  • Zhang X
  • Cell
  • 2016 Aug 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Alternative splicing is prevalent in the mammalian brain. To interrogate the functional role of alternative splicing in neural development, we analyzed purified neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons from developing cerebral cortices, revealing hundreds of differentially spliced exons that preferentially alter key protein domains-especially in cytoskeletal proteins-and can harbor disease-causing mutations. We show that Ptbp1 and Rbfox proteins antagonistically govern the NPC-to-neuron transition by regulating neuron-specific exons. Whereas Ptbp1 maintains apical progenitors partly through suppressing a poison exon of Flna in NPCs, Rbfox proteins promote neuronal differentiation by switching Ninein from a centrosomal splice form in NPCs to a non-centrosomal isoform in neurons. We further uncover an intronic human mutation within a PTBP1-binding site that disrupts normal skipping of the FLNA poison exon in NPCs and causes a brain-specific malformation. Our study indicates that dynamic control of alternative splicing governs cell fate in cerebral cortical development.