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PCNA (PC10) antibody

RRID:AB_628110

Antibody ID

AB_628110

Target Antigen

PCNA (PC10) mouse, rat, human, insect, schizosaccharomyces pombe, mouse, human, rat

Proper Citation

(Santa Cruz Biotechnology Cat# sc-56, RRID:AB_628110)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Comments

validation status unknown check with seller; recommendations: Immunofluorescence; Immunohistochemistry; Immunocytochemistry; Immunoprecipitation; Western Blot; Flow Cytometry; WB, IP, IF, IHC(P), FCM

Host Organism

mouse

Vendor

Santa Cruz Biotechnology

Paneth Cell Multipotency Induced by Notch Activation following Injury.

  • Yu S
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2018 Jul 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Paneth cells are post-mitotic intestinal epithelial cells supporting the stem cell niche and mucosal immunity. Paneth cell pathologies are observed in various gastrointestinal diseases, but their plasticity and response to genomic and environmental challenges remain unclear. Using a knockin allele engineered at the mouse Lyz1 locus, we performed detailed Paneth cell-lineage tracing. Irradiation induced a subset of Paneth cells to proliferate and differentiate into villus epithelial cells. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) revealed that Paneth cells sorted from irradiated mice acquired a stem cell-like transcriptome; when cultured in vitro, these individual Paneth cells formed organoids. Irradiation activated Notch signaling, and forced expression of Notch intracellular domain (NICD) in Paneth cells, but not Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation, induced their dedifferentiation. This study documents Paneth cell plasticity, particularly their ability to participate in epithelial replenishment following stem cell loss, adding to a growing body of knowledge detailing the molecular pathways controlling injury-induced regeneration.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA190558()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R21 CA178599()
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10 RR027022()
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01AR055926(United States)
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK102934()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R03 DK093809()
  • NIH HHS - S10 OD018103()

Histone Methylation by SETD1A Protects Nascent DNA through the Nucleosome Chaperone Activity of FANCD2.

  • Higgs MR
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Jul 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Components of the Fanconi anemia and homologous recombination pathways play a vital role in protecting newly replicated DNA from uncontrolled nucleolytic degradation, safeguarding genome stability. Here we report that histone methylation by the lysine methyltransferase SETD1A is crucial for protecting stalled replication forks from deleterious resection. Depletion of SETD1A sensitizes cells to replication stress and leads to uncontrolled DNA2-dependent resection of damaged replication forks. The ability of SETD1A to prevent degradation of these structures is mediated by its ability to catalyze methylation on Lys4 of histone H3 (H3K4) at replication forks, which enhances FANCD2-dependent histone chaperone activity. Suppressing H3K4 methylation or expression of a chaperone-defective FANCD2 mutant leads to loss of RAD51 nucleofilament stability and severe nucleolytic degradation of replication forks. Our work identifies epigenetic modification and histone mobility as critical regulatory mechanisms in maintaining genome stability by restraining nucleases from irreparably damaging stalled replication forks.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - RR024574(United States)

BAI1 Suppresses Medulloblastoma Formation by Protecting p53 from Mdm2-Mediated Degradation.

  • Zhu D
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2018 Jun 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) encompass 33 human transmembrane proteins with long N termini involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. We show the ADGRB1 gene, which encodes Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), is epigenetically silenced in medulloblastomas (MBs) through a methyl-CpG binding protein MBD2-dependent mechanism. Knockout of Adgrb1 in mice augments proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors, and leads to accelerated tumor growth in the Ptch1+/- transgenic MB mouse model. BAI1 prevents Mdm2-mediated p53 polyubiquitination, and its loss substantially reduces p53 levels. Reactivation of BAI1/p53 signaling axis by a brain-permeable MBD2 pathway inhibitor suppresses MB growth in vivo. Altogether, our data define BAI1's physiological role in tumorigenesis and directly couple an ADGR to cancer formation.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - ROP99020(Canada)
  • NCI NIH HHS - P20 CA151129()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA138292()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA086335()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA163722()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - P30 NS055077()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS096236()

Polε Instability Drives Replication Stress, Abnormal Development, and Tumorigenesis.

  • Bellelli R
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 May 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

DNA polymerase ε (POLE) is a four-subunit complex and the major leading strand polymerase in eukaryotes. Budding yeast orthologs of POLE3 and POLE4 promote Polε processivity in vitro but are dispensable for viability in vivo. Here, we report that POLE4 deficiency in mice destabilizes the entire Polε complex, leading to embryonic lethality in inbred strains and extensive developmental abnormalities, leukopenia, and tumor predisposition in outbred strains. Comparable phenotypes of growth retardation and immunodeficiency are also observed in human patients harboring destabilizing mutations in POLE1. In both Pole4-/- mouse and POLE1 mutant human cells, Polε hypomorphy is associated with replication stress and p53 activation, which we attribute to inefficient replication origin firing. Strikingly, removing p53 is sufficient to rescue embryonic lethality and all developmental abnormalities in Pole4 null mice. However, Pole4-/-p53+/- mice exhibit accelerated tumorigenesis, revealing an important role for controlled CMG and origin activation in normal development and tumor prevention.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - U01 AI070499(United States)

Dynamics of PARKIN-Dependent Mitochondrial Ubiquitylation in Induced Neurons and Model Systems Revealed by Digital Snapshot Proteomics.

  • Ordureau A
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Apr 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Flux through kinase and ubiquitin-driven signaling systems depends on the modification kinetics, stoichiometry, primary site specificity, and target abundance within the pathway, yet we rarely understand these parameters and their spatial organization within cells. Here we develop temporal digital snapshots of ubiquitin signaling on the mitochondrial outer membrane in embryonic stem cell-derived neurons, and we model HeLa cell systems upon activation of the PINK1 kinase and PARKIN ubiquitin ligase by proteomic counting of ubiquitylation and phosphorylation events. We define the kinetics and site specificity of PARKIN-dependent target ubiquitylation, and we demonstrate the power of this approach to quantify pathway modulators and to mechanistically define the role of PARKIN UBL phosphorylation in pathway activation in induced neurons. Finally, through modulation of pS65-Ub on mitochondria, we demonstrate that Ub hyper-phosphorylation is inhibitory to mitophagy receptor recruitment, indicating that pS65-Ub stoichiometry in vivo is optimized to coordinate PARKIN recruitment via pS65-Ub and mitophagy receptors via unphosphorylated chains.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - BB/I004815/1(United Kingdom)
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - K01 DK098285()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM067945()

SLFN11 Blocks Stressed Replication Forks Independently of ATR.

  • Murai J
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

SLFN11 sensitizes cancer cells to a broad range of DNA-targeted therapies. Here we show that, in response to replication stress induced by camptothecin, SLFN11 tightly binds chromatin at stressed replication foci via RPA1 together with the replication helicase subunit MCM3. Unlike ATR, SLFN11 neither interferes with the loading of CDC45 and PCNA nor inhibits the initiation of DNA replication but selectively blocks fork progression while inducing chromatin opening across replication initiation sites. The ATPase domain of SLFN11 is required for chromatin opening, replication block, and cell death but not for the tight binding of SLFN11 to chromatin. Replication stress by the CHK1 inhibitor Prexasertib also recruits SLFN11 to nascent replicating DNA together with CDC45 and PCNA. We conclude that SLFN11 is recruited to stressed replication forks carrying extended RPA filaments where it blocks replication by changing chromatin structure across replication sites.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA132630(United States)

Stabilization of Reversed Replication Forks by Telomerase Drives Telomere Catastrophe.

  • Margalef P
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jan 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Telomere maintenance critically depends on the distinct activities of telomerase, which adds telomeric repeats to solve the end replication problem, and RTEL1, which dismantles DNA secondary structures at telomeres to facilitate replisome progression. Here, we establish that reversed replication forks are a pathological substrate for telomerase and the source of telomere catastrophe in Rtel1-/- cells. Inhibiting telomerase recruitment to telomeres, but not its activity, or blocking replication fork reversal through PARP1 inhibition or depleting UBC13 or ZRANB3 prevents the rapid accumulation of dysfunctional telomeres in RTEL1-deficient cells. In this context, we establish that telomerase binding to reversed replication forks inhibits telomere replication, which can be mimicked by preventing replication fork restart through depletion of RECQ1 or PARG. Our results lead us to propose that telomerase inappropriately binds to and inhibits restart of reversed replication forks within telomeres, which compromises replication and leads to critically short telomeres.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - 100140(United Kingdom)

Replication Stress Shapes a Protective Chromatin Environment across Fragile Genomic Regions.

  • Kim J
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Jan 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Recent integrative epigenome analyses highlight the importance of functionally distinct chromatin states for accurate cell function. How these states are established and maintained is a matter of intense investigation. Here, we present evidence for DNA damage as an unexpected means to shape a protective chromatin environment at regions of recurrent replication stress (RS). Upon aberrant fork stalling, DNA damage signaling and concomitant H2AX phosphorylation coordinate the FACT-dependent deposition of macroH2A1.2, a histone variant that promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR). MacroH2A1.2, in turn, facilitates the accumulation of the tumor suppressor and HR effector BRCA1 at replication forks to protect from RS-induced DNA damage. Consequently, replicating primary cells steadily accrue macroH2A1.2 at fragile regions, whereas macroH2A1.2 loss in these cells triggers DNA damage signaling-dependent senescence, a hallmark of RS. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that recurrent DNA damage contributes to the chromatin landscape to ensure the epigenomic integrity of dividing cells.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA BC011282-01()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM073046(United States)

mTORC1 Inactivation Promotes Colitis-Induced Colorectal Cancer but Protects from APC Loss-Dependent Tumorigenesis.

  • Brandt M
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Jan 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dietary habits that can induce inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are major colorectal cancer (CRC) risk factors, but mechanisms linking nutrients, IBD, and CRC are unknown. Using human data and mouse models, we show that mTORC1 inactivation-induced chromosomal instability impairs intestinal crypt proliferation and regeneration, CDK4/6 dependently. This triggers interleukin (IL)-6-associated reparative inflammation, inducing crypt hyper-proliferation, wound healing, and CRC. Blocking IL-6 signaling or reactivating mTORC1 reduces inflammation-induced CRC, so mTORC1 activation suppresses tumorigenesis in IBD. Conversely, mTORC1 inactivation is beneficial in APC loss-dependent CRC. Thus, IL-6 blockers or protein-rich-diet-linked mTORC1 activation may prevent IBD-associated CRC. However, abolishing mTORC1 can mitigate CRC in predisposed patients with APC mutations. Our work reveals mTORC1 oncogenic and tumor-suppressive roles in intestinal epithelium and avenues to optimized and personalized therapeutic regimens for CRC.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007067(United States)

p53 orchestrates DNA replication restart homeostasis by suppressing mutagenic RAD52 and POLθ pathways.

  • Roy S
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jan 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Classically, p53 tumor suppressor acts in transcription, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. Yet, replication-mediated genomic instability is integral to oncogenesis, and p53 mutations promote tumor progression and drug-resistance. By delineating human and murine separation-of-function p53 alleles, we find that p53 null and gain-of-function (GOF) mutations exhibit defects in restart of stalled or damaged DNA replication forks that drive genomic instability, which isgenetically separable from transcription activation. By assaying protein-DNA fork interactions in single cells, we unveil a p53-MLL3-enabled recruitment of MRE11 DNA replication restart nuclease. Importantly, p53 defects or depletion unexpectedly allow mutagenic RAD52 and POLθ pathways to hijack stalled forks, which we find reflected in p53 defective breast-cancer patient COSMIC mutational signatures. These data uncover p53 as a keystone regulator of replication homeostasis within a DNA restart network. Mechanistically, this has important implications for development of resistance in cancer therapy. Combined, these results define an unexpected role for p53-mediated suppression of replication genome instability.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI038382(United States)

Molecular Anatomy of the Developing Human Retina.

  • Hoshino A
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Dec 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Clinical and genetic heterogeneity associated with retinal diseases makes stem-cell-based therapies an attractive strategy for personalized medicine. However, we have limited understanding of the timing of key events in the developing human retina, and in particular the factors critical for generating the unique architecture of the fovea and surrounding macula. Here we define three key epochs in the transcriptome dynamics of human retina from fetal day (D) 52 to 136. Coincident histological analyses confirmed the cellular basis of transcriptional changes and highlighted the dramatic acceleration of development in the fovea compared with peripheral retina. Human and mouse retinal transcriptomes show remarkable similarity in developmental stages, although morphogenesis was greatly expanded in humans. Integration of DNA accessibility data allowed us to reconstruct transcriptional networks controlling photoreceptor differentiation. Our studies provide insights into human retinal development and serve as a resource for molecular staging of human stem-cell-derived retinal organoids.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA EY000450-09()
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA EY000474-08()
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA EY000546-02()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01CA40046(United States)
  • NEI NIH HHS - F32 EY025117()
  • NEI NIH HHS - Z01 EY000450()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R24 HD000836()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - P01 GM081619()

mTORC1-Mediated Inhibition of 4EBP1 Is Essential for Hedgehog Signaling-Driven Translation and Medulloblastoma.

  • Wu CC
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Dec 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) cooperates with Hedgehog (HH) signaling, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here we provide genetic, biochemical, and pharmacologic evidence that MTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-dependent translation is a prerequisite for HH signaling. The genetic loss of mTORC1 function inhibited HH signaling-driven growth of the cerebellum and medulloblastoma. Inhibiting translation or mTORC1 blocked HH signaling. Depleting 4EBP1, an mTORC1 target that inhibits translation, alleviated the dependence of HH signaling on mTORC1. Consistent with this, phosphorylated 4EBP1 levels were elevated in HH signaling-driven medulloblastomas in mice and humans. In mice, an mTORC1 inhibitor suppressed medulloblastoma driven by a mutant SMO that is inherently resistant to existing SMO inhibitors, prolonging the survival of the mice. Our study reveals that mTORC1-mediated translation is a key component of HH signaling and an important target for treating medulloblastoma and other cancers driven by HH signaling.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA021765()

GSK-3β inhibition suppresses instability-induced osteolysis by a dual action on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation.

  • Amirhosseini M
  • J. Cell. Physiol.
  • 2017 Dec 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

Currently, there are no medications available to treat aseptic loosening of orthopedic implants. Using osteoprotegerin fusion protein (OPG-Fc), we previously blocked instability-induced osteoclast differentiation and peri-prosthetic osteolysis. Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which regulates OPG secretion from osteoblasts, also modulates the bone tissue response to mechanical loading. We hypothesized that activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) would reduce instability-induced bone loss through regulation of both osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. We examined effects of GSK-3β inhibition on regulation of RANKL and OPG in a rat model of mechanical instability-induced peri-implant osteolysis. The rats were treated daily with a GSK-3β inhibitor, AR28 (20 mg/kg bw), for up to 5 days. Bone tissue and blood serum were assessed by qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA on days 3 and 5, and by micro-CT on day 5. After 3 days of treatment with AR28, mRNA levels of β-catenin, Runx2, Osterix, Col1α1, and ALP were increased leading to higher osteoblast numbers compared to vehicle-treated animals. BMP-2 and Wnt16 mRNA levels were downregulated by mechanical instability and this was rescued by GSK-3β inhibition. Osteoclast numbers were decreased significantly after 3 days of GSK-3β inhibition, which correlated with enhanced OPG mRNA expression. This was accompanied by decreased serum levels of TRAP5b on days 3 and 5. Treatment with AR28 upregulated osteoblast differentiation, while osteoclastogenesis was blunted, leading to increased bone mass by day 5. These data suggest that GSK-3β inactivation suppresses osteolysis through regulating both osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation in a rat model of instability-induced osteolysis.

Life-Long Neurogenic Activity of Individual Neural Stem Cells and Continuous Growth Establish an Outside-In Architecture in the Teleost Pallium.

  • Furlan G
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 Nov 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Spatiotemporal variations of neurogenesis are thought to account for the evolution of brain shape. In the dorsal telencephalon (pallium) of vertebrates, it remains unresolved which ancestral neurogenesis mode prefigures the highly divergent cytoarchitectures that are seen in extant species. To gain insight into this question, we developed genetic tools to generate here the first 4-dimensional (3D + birthdating time) map of pallium construction in the adult teleost zebrafish. Using a Tet-On-based genetic birthdating strategy, we identify a "sequential stacking" construction mode where neurons derived from the zebrafish pallial germinal zone arrange in outside-in, age-related layers from a central core generated during embryogenesis. We obtained no evidence for overt radial or tangential neuronal migrations. Cre-lox-mediated tracing, which included following Brainbow clones, further demonstrates that this process is sustained by the persistent neurogenic activity of individual pallial neural stem cells (NSCs) from embryo to adult. Together, these data demonstrate that the spatiotemporal control of NSC activity is an important driver of the macroarchitecture of the zebrafish adult pallium. This simple mode of pallium construction shares distinct traits with pallial genesis in mammals and non-mammalian amniotes such as birds or reptiles, suggesting that it may exemplify the basal layout from which vertebrate pallial architectures were elaborated.

Structure of the Dnmt1 Reader Module Complexed with a Unique Two-Mono-Ubiquitin Mark on Histone H3 Reveals the Basis for DNA Methylation Maintenance.

  • Ishiyama S
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

The proper location and timing of Dnmt1 activation are essential for DNA methylation maintenance. We demonstrate here that Dnmt1 utilizes two-mono-ubiquitylated histone H3 as a unique ubiquitin mark for its recruitment to and activation at DNA methylation sites. The crystal structure of the replication foci targeting sequence (RFTS) of Dnmt1 in complex with H3-K18Ub/23Ub reveals striking differences to the known ubiquitin-recognition structures. The two ubiquitins are simultaneously bound to the RFTS with a combination of canonical hydrophobic and atypical hydrophilic interactions. The C-lobe of RFTS, together with the K23Ub surface, also recognizes the N-terminal tail of H3. The binding of H3-K18Ub/23Ub results in spatial rearrangement of two lobes in the RFTS, suggesting the opening of its active site. Actually, incubation of Dnmt1 with H3-K18Ub/23Ub increases its catalytic activity in vitro. Our results therefore shed light on the essential role of a unique ubiquitin-binding module in DNA methylation maintenance.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - 5R03HD077545(United States)

Mitotic Spindle Assembly and Genomic Stability in Breast Cancer Require PI3K-C2α Scaffolding Function.

  • Gulluni F
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2017 Oct 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Proper organization of the mitotic spindle is key to genetic stability, but molecular components of inter-microtubule bridges that crosslink kinetochore fibers (K-fibers) are still largely unknown. Here we identify a kinase-independent function of class II phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase α (PI3K-C2α) acting as limiting scaffold protein organizing clathrin and TACC3 complex crosslinking K-fibers. Downregulation of PI3K-C2α causes spindle alterations, delayed anaphase onset, and aneuploidy, indicating that PI3K-C2α expression is required for genomic stability. Reduced abundance of PI3K-C2α in breast cancer models initially impairs tumor growth but later leads to the convergent evolution of fast-growing clones with mitotic checkpoint defects. As a consequence of altered spindle, loss of PI3K-C2α increases sensitivity to taxane-based therapy in pre-clinical models and in neoadjuvant settings.

Replication Fork Slowing and Reversal upon DNA Damage Require PCNA Polyubiquitination and ZRANB3 DNA Translocase Activity.

  • Vujanovic M
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Sep 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

DNA damage tolerance during eukaryotic replication is orchestrated by PCNA ubiquitination. While monoubiquitination activates mutagenic translesion synthesis, polyubiquitination activates an error-free pathway, elusive in mammals, enabling damage bypass by template switching. Fork reversal is driven in vitro by multiple enzymes, including the DNA translocase ZRANB3, shown to bind polyubiquitinated PCNA. However, whether this interaction promotes fork remodeling and template switching in vivo was unknown. Here we show that damage-induced fork reversal in mammalian cells requires PCNA ubiquitination, UBC13, and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, previously involved in error-free damage tolerance. Fork reversal in vivo also requires ZRANB3 translocase activity and its interaction with polyubiquitinated PCNA, pinpointing ZRANB3 as a key effector of error-free DNA damage tolerance. Mutations affecting fork reversal also induced unrestrained fork progression and chromosomal breakage, suggesting fork remodeling as a global fork slowing and protection mechanism. Targeting these fork protection systems represents a promising strategy to potentiate cancer chemotherapy.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA197774()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM116616()

Neurons and Glial Cells Are Added to the Female Rat Anteroventral Periventricular Nucleus During Puberty.

  • Mohr MA
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Jun 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

The anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) orchestrates the neuroendocrine-positive feedback response that triggers ovulation in female rodents. The AVPV is larger and more cell-dense in females than in males, and during puberty, only females develop the capacity to show a positive feedback response. We previously reported a potential new mechanism to explain this female-specific gain of function during puberty, namely a female-biased sex difference in the pubertal addition of new cells to the rat AVPV. Here we first asked whether this sex difference is due to greater cell proliferation and/or survival in females. Female and male rats received the cell birthdate marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 200 mg/kg, ip) on postnatal day (P) 30; brains were collected at short and long intervals after BrdU administration to assess cell proliferation and survival, respectively. Overall, females had more BrdU-immunoreactive cells in the AVPV than did males, with no sex differences in the rate of cell attrition over time. Thus, the sex difference in pubertal addition of AVPV cells appears to be due to greater cell proliferation in females. Next, to determine the phenotype of pubertally born AVPV cells, daily BrdU injections were given to female rats on P28-56, and tissue was collected on P77 to assess colocalization of BrdU and markers for mature neurons or glia. Of the pubertally born AVPV cells, approximately 15% differentiated into neurons, approximately 19% into astrocytes, and approximately 23% into microglia. Thus, both neuro- and gliogenesis occur in the pubertal female rat AVPV and potentially contribute to maturation of female reproductive function.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH059950(United States)

Blockade of Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 2 Signaling Attenuates High-Fat Diet-Induced Adipocyte Hypertrophy and Systemic Glucose Intolerance in Mice.

  • Kitada Y
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Jun 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is known to regulate insulin resistance in hepatocytes, skeletal muscle cells, and pancreatic β-cells. Among its 5 cognate receptors (S1pr1-S1pr5), S1P seems to counteract insulin signaling and confer insulin resistance via S1pr2 in these cells. S1P may also regulate insulin resistance in adipocytes, but the S1pr subtype(s) involved remains unknown. Here, we investigated systemic glucose/insulin tolerance and phenotypes of epididymal adipocytes in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed wild-type and S1pr2-deficient (S1pr2(-/-)) mice. Adult S1pr2(-/-) mice displayed smaller body/epididymal fat tissue weights, but the differences became negligible after 4 weeks with HFD. However, HFD-fed S1pr2(-/-) mice displayed better scores in glucose/insulin tolerance tests and had smaller epididymal adipocytes that expressed higher levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen than wild-type mice. Next, proliferation/differentiation of 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A preadipocytes were examined in the presence of various S1pr antagonists: JTE-013 (S1pr2 antagonist), VPC-23019 (S1pr1/S1pr3 antagonist), and CYM-50358 (S1pr4 antagonist). S1P or JTE-013 treatment of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes potently activated their proliferation and Erk phosphorylation, whereas VPC-23019 inhibited both of these processes, and CYM-50358 had no effects. In contrast, S1P or JTE-013 treatment inhibited adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-F442A preadipocytes, whereas VPC-23019 activated it. The small interfering RNA knockdown of S1pr2 promoted proliferation and inhibited differentiation of 3T3-F442A preadipocytes, whereas that of S1pr1 acted oppositely. Moreover, oral JTE-013 administration improved glucose tolerance/insulin sensitivity in ob/ob mice. Taken together, S1pr2 blockade induced proliferation but suppressed differentiation of (pre)adipocytes both in vivo and in vitro, highlighting a novel therapeutic approach for obesity/type 2 diabetes.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL133166(United States)

Unprotected Replication Forks Are Converted into Mitotic Sister Chromatid Bridges.

  • Ait Saada A
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 May 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Replication stress and mitotic abnormalities are key features of cancer cells. Temporarily paused forks are stabilized by the intra-S phase checkpoint and protected by the association of Rad51, which prevents Mre11-dependent resection. However, if a fork becomes dysfunctional and cannot resume, this terminally arrested fork is rescued by a converging fork to avoid unreplicated parental DNA during mitosis. Alternatively, dysfunctional forks are restarted by homologous recombination. Using fission yeast, we report that Rad52 and the DNA binding activity of Rad51, but not its strand-exchange activity, act to protect terminally arrested forks from unrestrained Exo1-nucleolytic activity. In the absence of recombination proteins, large ssDNA gaps, up to 3 kb long, occur behind terminally arrested forks, preventing efficient fork merging and leading to mitotic sister chromatid bridging. Thus, Rad52 and Rad51 prevent temporarily and terminally arrested forks from degrading and, despite the availability of converging forks, converting to anaphase bridges causing aneuploidy and cell death.

Glutamate Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit (Gclm) Null Mice Have Increased Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Accelerated Age-Related Ovarian Failure.

  • Lim J
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Sep 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glutathione (GSH) is the one of the most abundant intracellular antioxidants. Mice lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, have decreased GSH. Our prior work showed that GSH plays antiapoptotic roles in ovarian follicles. We hypothesized that Gclm(-/-) mice have accelerated ovarian aging due to ovarian oxidative stress. We found significantly decreased ovarian GSH concentrations and oxidized GSH/oxidized glutathione redox potential in Gclm(-/-) vs Gclm(+/+) ovaries. Prepubertal Gclm(-/-) and Gclm(+/+) mice had similar numbers of ovarian follicles, and as expected, the total number of ovarian follicles declined with age in both genotypes. However, the rate of decline in follicles was significantly more rapid in Gclm(-/-) mice, and this was driven by accelerated declines in primordial follicles, which constitute the ovarian reserve. We found significantly increased 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining (oxidative lipid damage marker) and significantly increased nitrotyrosine immunostaining (oxidative protein damage marker) in prepubertal and adult Gclm(-/-) ovaries compared with controls. The percentage of small ovarian follicles with increased granulosa cell proliferation was significantly higher in prepubertal and 2-month-old Gclm(-/-) vs Gclm(+/+) ovaries, indicating accelerated recruitment of primordial follicles into the growing pool. The percentages of growing follicles with apoptotic granulosa cells were increased in young adult ovaries. Our results demonstrate increased ovarian oxidative stress and oxidative damage in young Gclm(-/-) mice, associated with an accelerated decline in ovarian follicles that appears to be mediated by increased recruitment of follicles into the growing pool, followed by apoptosis at later stages of follicular development.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - U01 MH105960(United States)

Early involvement of synapsin III in neural progenitor cell development in the adult hippocampus.

  • Kao HT
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Synapsin III is a synaptic vesicle-associated protein that is expressed in cells of the subgranular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus, a brain region known to sustain substantial levels of neurogenesis into adulthood. Here we tested the hypothesis that synapsin III plays a role in adult neurogenesis with synapsin III knockout and wild-type mice. Immunocytochemistry of the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus revealed that synapsin III colocalizes with markers of neural progenitor cell development (nestin, PSA-NCAM, NeuN, and Tuj1) but did not colocalize with markers of mitosis (Ki67 and PCNA). Because neurogenesis consists of a number of stages, the proliferation, survival, and differentiation of neural progenitor cells were systematically quantitated in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult synapsin III knockout and wild-type mice. We found a 30% decrease in proliferation and a 55% increase in survival of neural progenitor cells in synapsin III knockout mice. We also observed a 6% increase in the number of neural progenitor cells that differentiated into neurons. No difference in the volume of the dentate gyrus was observed between synapsin III knockout and wild-type mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate a novel role for synapsin III in regulating the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. These findings suggest a distinct function for this synaptic vesicle protein, in addition to its role in neurotransmission.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - (United States)

Decreased neurogenesis in aged rats results from loss of granule cell precursors without lengthening of the cell cycle.

  • Olariu A
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2007 Apr 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

It is well established that neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus slows with aging, but it is unclear whether this change is due to slowing of the cell cycle, as occurs during development, or to loss of precursor cells. In the current study, we find that the cell cycle time of granule cell precursors in middle-aged male rats is not significantly different from that in young adults. The size of the precursor pool, however, was 3-4 times smaller in the middle-aged rats, as determined using both cumulative bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling as well as labeling with the endogenous marker of cell proliferation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Loss of precursor cells was much greater in the granule cell layer than in the hilus, suggesting that dividing cells in the hilus belong to a distinct population, most likely glial progenitors, that are less affected by aging than neuronal precursors. BrdU-labeled precursor cells and young neurons, labeled with doublecortin, appeared to be lost equally from rostral and caudal, as well as suprapyramidal and infrapyramidal, subregions of the granule cell layer. However, doublecortin staining did show large parts of the caudal granule cell layer with few if any young neurons at both ages. Taken together, these findings indicate that precursor cells are not distributed evenly within the dentate gyrus in adulthood but that precursors are lost from throughout the dentate gyrus in old age with no concomitant change in the cell cycle time.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - U54 HD083091(United States)