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PE anti-mouse CD4 antibody

RRID:AB_312715

Antibody ID

AB_312715

Target Antigen

CD4 See NCBI gene mouse

Proper Citation

(BioLegend Cat# 100512, RRID:AB_312715)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Comments

Applications: FC

Clone ID

Clone RM4-5

Host Organism

rat

Vendor

BioLegend Go To Vendor

Cat Num

100512

Publications that use this research resource

CRIg, a tissue-resident macrophage specific immune checkpoint molecule, promotes immunological tolerance in NOD mice, via a dual role in effector and regulatory T cells.

  • Yuan X
  • Elife
  • 2017 Nov 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

How tissue-resident macrophages (TRM) impact adaptive immune responses remains poorly understood. We report novel mechanisms by which TRMs regulate T cell activities at tissue sites. These mechanisms are mediated by the complement receptor of immunoglobulin family (CRIg). Using animal models for autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D), we found that CRIg+ TRMs formed a protective barrier surrounding pancreatic islets. Genetic ablation of CRIg exacerbated islet inflammation and local T cell activation. CRIg exhibited a dual function of attenuating early T cell activation and promoting the differentiation of Foxp3+ regulatory (Treg) cells. More importantly, CRIg stabilized the expression of Foxp3 in Treg cells, by enhancing their responsiveness to interleukin-2. The expression of CRIg in TRMs was postnatally regulated by gut microbial signals and metabolites. Thus, environmental cues instruct TRMs to express CRIg, which functions as an immune checkpoint molecule to regulate adaptive immunity and promote immune tolerance.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM07270(United States)

Segmented Filamentous Bacteria Provoke Lung Autoimmunity by Inducing Gut-Lung Axis Th17 Cells Expressing Dual TCRs.

  • Bradley CP
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2017 Nov 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Lung complications are a major cause of rheumatoid arthritis-related mortality. Involvement of gut microbiota in lung diseases by the gut-lung axis has been widely observed, but the underlying mechanism remains mostly unknown. Using an autoimmune arthritis model, we show that a constituent of the gut microbiota, segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB), distantly provoke lung pathology. SFB induce autoantibodies in lung during the pre-arthritic phase, and SFB-dependent lung pathology requires the T helper 17 (Th17) responses. SFB-induced gut Th17 cells are preferentially recruited to lung over spleen due to robust expression in the lung of the Th17 chemoattractant, CCL20. Additionally, we found that in peripheral tissues, SFB selectively expand dual T cell receptor (TCR)-expressing Th17 cells recognizing both an SFB epitope and self-antigen, thus augmenting autoimmunity. This study reveals mechanisms for commensal-mediated gut-lung crosstalk and dual TCR-based autoimmunity.