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BrdU antibody [BU1/75 (ICR1)]

RRID:AB_305426

Antibody ID

AB_305426

Target Antigen

BrdU antibody [BU1/75 (ICR1)]

Proper Citation

(Abcam Cat# ab6326, RRID:AB_305426)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Comments

validation status unknown, seller recommendations provided in 2012:2a;2a Flow Cyt, ICC, ICC/IF, IHC (PFA fixed), IHC-FoFr, IHC-Fr, IHC-FrFl, IHC-P; Chromatography; Flow Cytometry; Other; Immunohistochemistry - frozen; Immunocytochemistry; Immunohistochemistry; Immunohistochemistry - fixed; Immunofluorescence

Host Organism

rat

Vendor

Abcam

Identification of NeuN immunopositive cells in the adult mouse subventricular zone.

  • Saito K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Aug 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the adult rodent subventricular zone (SVZ), there are neural stem cells (NSCs) and the specialized neurogenic niche is critical to maintain their stemness. To date, many cellular and noncellular factors that compose the neurogenic niche and markers to identify subpopulations of Type A cells have been confirmed. In particular, neurotransmitters regulate adult neurogenesis and mature neurons in the SVZ have been only partially analyzed. Moreover, Type A cells, descendants of NSCs, are highly heterogeneous and more molecular markers are still needed to identify them. In the present study, we systematically classified NeuN, commonly used as a marker of mature and immature post-mitotic neurons, immunopositive (+) cells within the adult mouse SVZ. These SVZ-NeuN+ cells (SVZ-Ns) were mainly classified into two types. One was mature SVZ-Ns (M-SVZ-Ns). Neurochemical properties of M-SVZ-Ns were similar to those of striatal neurons, but their birth date and morphology were different. M-SVZ-Ns were generated during embryonic and early postnatal stages with bipolar peaks and extended their processes along the wall of the lateral ventricle. The second type was small SVZ-Ns (S-SVZ-Ns) with features of Type A cells. They expressed not only markers of Type A cells, but also proliferated and migrated from the SVZ to the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, S-SVZ-Ns could be classified into two types by their spatial locations and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression. Our data indicate that M-SVZ-Ns are a new component of the neurogenic niche and S-SVZ-Ns are newly identified subpopulations of Type A cells.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM102869-01(United States)

Selective Loss of PARG Restores PARylation and Counteracts PARP Inhibitor-Mediated Synthetic Lethality.

  • Gogola E
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2018 Jun 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase (PARPi) have recently entered the clinic for the treatment of homologous recombination (HR)-deficient cancers. Despite the success of this approach, drug resistance is a clinical hurdle, and we poorly understand how cancer cells escape the deadly effects of PARPi without restoring the HR pathway. By combining genetic screens with multi-omics analysis of matched PARPi-sensitive and -resistant Brca2-mutated mouse mammary tumors, we identified loss of PAR glycohydrolase (PARG) as a major resistance mechanism. We also found the presence of PARG-negative clones in a subset of human serous ovarian and triple-negative breast cancers. PARG depletion restores PAR formation and partially rescues PARP1 signaling. Importantly, PARG inactivation exposes vulnerabilities that can be exploited therapeutically.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM061835(United States)

Epithelial Sodium Channel Regulates Adult Neural Stem Cell Proliferation in a Flow-Dependent Manner.

  • Petrik D
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2018 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

One hallmark of adult neurogenesis is its adaptability to environmental influences. Here, we uncovered the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) as a key regulator of adult neurogenesis as its deletion in neural stem cells (NSCs) and their progeny in the murine subependymal zone (SEZ) strongly impairs their proliferation and neurogenic output in the olfactory bulb. Importantly, alteration of fluid flow promotes proliferation of SEZ cells in an ENaC-dependent manner, eliciting sodium and calcium signals that regulate proliferation via calcium-release-activated channels and phosphorylation of ERK. Flow-induced calcium signals are restricted to NSCs in contact with the ventricular fluid, thereby providing a highly specific mechanism to regulate NSC behavior at this special interface with the cerebrospinal fluid. Thus, ENaC plays a central role in regulating adult neurogenesis, and among multiple modes of ENaC function, flow-induced changes in sodium signals are critical for NSC biology.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA CP005803-15(United States)

Activation of GPR55 increases neural stem cell proliferation and promotes early adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  • Hill JD
  • Br. J. Pharmacol.
  • 2018 Jun 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The cannabinoid system exerts functional regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and adult neurogenesis, yet not all effects of cannabinoid-like compounds seen can be attributed to the cannabinoid 1 (CB1 ) or CB2 receptor. The recently de-orphaned GPR55 has been shown to be activated by numerous cannabinoid ligands suggesting that GPR55 is a third cannabinoid receptor. Here, we examined the role of GPR55 activation in NSC proliferation and early adult neurogenesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: The effects of GPR55 agonists (LPI, O-1602, ML184) on human (h) NSC proliferation in vitro were assessed by flow cytometry. Human NSC differentiation was determined by flow cytometry, qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Immature neuron formation in the hippocampus of C57BL/6 and GPR55-/- mice was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. KEY RESULTS: Activation of GPR55 significantly increased proliferation rates of hNSCs in vitro. These effects were attenuated by ML193, a selective GPR55 antagonist. ML184 significantly promoted neuronal differentiation in vitro while ML193 reduced differentiation rates as compared to vehicle treatment. Continuous administration of O-1602 into the hippocampus via a cannula connected to an osmotic pump resulted in increased Ki67+ cells within the dentate gyrus. O-1602 increased immature neuron generation, as assessed by DCX+ and BrdU+ cells, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. GPR55-/- animals displayed reduced rates of proliferation and neurogenesis within the hippocampus while O-1602 had no effect as compared to vehicle controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Together, these findings suggest GPR55 activation as a novel target and strategy to regulate NSC proliferation and adult neurogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA 100707-12(United States)

Brain Somatic Mutations in MTOR Disrupt Neuronal Ciliogenesis, Leading to Focal Cortical Dyslamination.

  • Park SM
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Jun 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Focal malformations of cortical development (FMCDs), including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and hemimegalencephaly (HME), are major etiologies of pediatric intractable epilepsies exhibiting cortical dyslamination. Brain somatic mutations in MTOR have recently been identified as a major genetic cause of FMCDs. However, the molecular mechanism by which these mutations lead to cortical dyslamination remains poorly understood. Here, using patient tissue, genome-edited cells, and mouse models with brain somatic mutations in MTOR, we discovered that disruption of neuronal ciliogenesis by the mutations underlies cortical dyslamination in FMCDs. We found that abnormal accumulation of OFD1 at centriolar satellites due to perturbed autophagy was responsible for the defective neuronal ciliogenesis. Additionally, we found that disrupted neuronal ciliogenesis accounted for cortical dyslamination in FMCDs by compromising Wnt signals essential for neuronal polarization. Altogether, this study describes a molecular mechanism by which brain somatic mutations in MTOR contribute to the pathogenesis of cortical dyslamination in FMCDs.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - HL073284(United States)

Detecting proliferation of adult hemocytes in Drosophila by BrdU incorporation.

  • Ghosh S
  • Wellcome Open Res
  • 2018 Jun 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Drosophila and mammalian hematopoiesis share several similarities that ranges from phases to the battery of transcription factors and signaling molecules that execute this process. These resounding similarities along with the rich genetic tools available in fruitfly makes it a popular invertebrate model to study blood cell development both during normal and aberrant conditions. The larval system is the most extensively studied to date. Several studies have shown that these hemocytes just like mammalian counterpart proliferate and get routinely regenerated upon infection. However, employing the same protocol it was concluded that blood cell proliferation although abundant in larval stages is absent in adult fruitfly. The current protocol describes the strategies that can be employed to document the hemocyte proliferation in adulthood. The fact that a subset of blood cells tucked away in the hematopoietic hub are not locked in senescence, rather they still harbour the proliferative capacity to tide over challenges was successfully demonstrated by this method.  Although we have adopted bacterial infection as a bait to evoke this proliferative capacity of the hemocytes, we envision that it can also efficiently characterize the proliferative responses of hemocytes in tumorigenic conditions as well as scenarios of environmental and metabolic stresses during adulthood.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - BB/I000852/1(United Kingdom)

The neuroregenerative capacity of olfactory stem cells is not limitless: implications for aging.

  • Child KM
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jun 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

The olfactory epithelium (OE) of vertebrates is a highly regenerative neuroepithelium, maintained under normal condition by a population of stem and progenitor cells - globose basal cells (GBCs) that also contribute to epithelial reconstitution after injury. However, aging of the OE often leads to neurogenic exhaustion - the disappearance of both GBCs and olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Aneuronal tissue may remain as olfactory, with an uninterrupted sheet of apically arrayed microvillar-capped sustentacular cell, or may undergo respiratory metaplasia. We have generated a transgenic mouse model for neurogenic exhaustion using OMP-driven Tet-off regulation of the A subunit of Diphtheria toxin such that the death of mature OSNs is accelerated. As early as 2 months of age the epithelium of transgenic mice, regardless of sex, recapitulates what is seen in the aged OE of humans and rodents. Areas of the epithelium completely lack neurons and GBCs, while the horizontal basal cells, a reserve stem cell population, show no evidence of activation. Surprisingly, other areas that were olfactory undergo respiratory metaplasia. The impact of accelerated neuronal death and reduced innervation on the olfactory bulb (OB) is also examined. Constant neuronal turnover leaves glomeruli shrunken and impacts the dopaminergic interneurons in the periglomerular layer. Moreover, the acceleration of OSN death can be reversed in those areas where some GBCs persist. However, the projection onto the OB recovers incompletely and the reinnervated glomeruli are markedly altered. Thus, the capacity for OE regeneration is tempered when GBCs disappear.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTA large percentage of humans lose or suffer a significant decline in olfactory function as they age. Consequently, quality of life suffers, and safety and nutritional status are put at risk. With age, the OE apparently becomes incapable of fully maintaining the neuronal population of the epithelium despite its well-known capacity for recovering from most forms of injury when younger which may contribute to age-related olfactory loss. Efforts to identify the mechanism by which olfactory neurogenesis becomes exhausted with age require a powerful model for accelerating age-related tissue pathology. The current OMP-tTA;TetO-DTA transgenic mouse model, in which olfactory neurons die when they reach maturity and accelerated death can be aborted to assess the capacity for structural recovery, satisfies that need.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R01 HD008188-36(United States)
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC014217(United States)

PAF-Myc-Controlled Cell Stemness Is Required for Intestinal Regeneration and Tumorigenesis.

  • Kim MJ
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Mar 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

The underlying mechanisms of how self-renewing cells are controlled in regenerating tissues and cancer remain ambiguous. PCNA-associated factor (PAF) modulates DNA repair via PCNA. Also, PAF hyperactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling independently of PCNA interaction. We found that PAF is expressed in intestinal stem and progenitor cells (ISCs and IPCs) and markedly upregulated during intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis. Whereas PAF is dispensable for intestinal homeostasis, upon radiation injury, genetic ablation of PAF impairs intestinal regeneration along with the severe loss of ISCs and Myc expression. Mechanistically, PAF conditionally occupies and transactivates the c-Myc promoter, which induces the expansion of ISCs/IPCs during intestinal regeneration. In mouse models, PAF knockout inhibits Apc inactivation-driven intestinal tumorigenesis with reduced tumor cell stemness and suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, supported by transcriptome profiling. Collectively, our results unveil that the PAF-Myc signaling axis is indispensable for intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis by positively regulating self-renewing cells.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - 2P01CA098912(United States)
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA016672()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P50 CA098258()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA193297()

Programming of Schwann Cells by Lats1/2-TAZ/YAP Signaling Drives Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumorigenesis.

  • Wu LMN
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2018 Feb 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly aggressive Schwann cell (SC)-lineage-derived sarcomas. Molecular events driving SC-to-MPNST transformation are incompletely understood. Here, we show that human MPNSTs exhibit elevated HIPPO-TAZ/YAP expression, and that TAZ/YAP hyperactivity in SCs caused by Lats1/2 loss potently induces high-grade nerve-associated tumors with full penetrance. Lats1/2 deficiency reprograms SCs to a cancerous, progenitor-like phenotype and promotes hyperproliferation. Conversely, disruption of TAZ/YAP activity alleviates tumor burden in Lats1/2-deficient mice and inhibits human MPNST cell proliferation. Moreover, genome-wide profiling reveals that TAZ/YAP-TEAD1 directly activates oncogenic programs, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling. Co-targeting TAZ/YAP and PDGFR pathways inhibits tumor growth. Thus, our findings establish a previously unrecognized convergence between Lats1/2-TAZ/YAP signaling and MPNST pathogenesis, revealing potential therapeutic targets in these untreatable tumors.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL132211()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG040990(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS072427()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS075243()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS078092()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS086219()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R37 NS096359()

SLFN11 Blocks Stressed Replication Forks Independently of ATR.

  • Murai J
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

SLFN11 sensitizes cancer cells to a broad range of DNA-targeted therapies. Here we show that, in response to replication stress induced by camptothecin, SLFN11 tightly binds chromatin at stressed replication foci via RPA1 together with the replication helicase subunit MCM3. Unlike ATR, SLFN11 neither interferes with the loading of CDC45 and PCNA nor inhibits the initiation of DNA replication but selectively blocks fork progression while inducing chromatin opening across replication initiation sites. The ATPase domain of SLFN11 is required for chromatin opening, replication block, and cell death but not for the tight binding of SLFN11 to chromatin. Replication stress by the CHK1 inhibitor Prexasertib also recruits SLFN11 to nascent replicating DNA together with CDC45 and PCNA. We conclude that SLFN11 is recruited to stressed replication forks carrying extended RPA filaments where it blocks replication by changing chromatin structure across replication sites.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA132630(United States)

Adult Neurogenesis Is Sustained by Symmetric Self-Renewal and Differentiation.

  • Obernier K
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2018 Feb 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Somatic stem cells have been identified in multiple adult tissues. Whether self-renewal occurs symmetrically or asymmetrically is key to understanding long-term stem cell maintenance and generation of progeny for cell replacement. In the adult mouse brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) (B1 cells) are retained in the walls of the lateral ventricles (ventricular-subventricular zone [V-SVZ]). The mechanism of B1 cell retention into adulthood for lifelong neurogenesis is unknown. Using multiple clonal labeling techniques, we show that the vast majority of B1 cells divide symmetrically. Whereas 20%-30% symmetrically self-renew and can remain in the niche for several months before generating neurons, 70%-80% undergo consuming divisions generating progeny, resulting in the depletion of B1 cells over time. This cellular mechanism decouples self-renewal from the generation of progeny. Limited rounds of symmetric self-renewal and consuming symmetric differentiation divisions can explain the levels of neurogenesis observed throughout life.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R01 HD032116()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R37 HD032116()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - P50 GM081879()
  • NIH HHS - DP5 OD012194()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS028478()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01NS058529(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R37 NS028478()

Myocardial Polyploidization Creates a Barrier to Heart Regeneration in Zebrafish.

  • González-Rosa JM
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Correlative evidence suggests that polyploidization of heart muscle, which occurs naturally in post-natal mammals, creates a barrier to heart regeneration. Here, we move beyond a correlation by demonstrating that experimental polyploidization of zebrafish cardiomyocytes is sufficient to suppress their proliferative potential during regeneration. Initially, we determined that zebrafish myocardium becomes susceptible to polyploidization upon transient cytokinesis inhibition mediated by dominant-negative Ect2. Using a transgenic strategy, we generated adult animals containing mosaic hearts composed of differentially labeled diploid and polyploid-enriched cardiomyocyte populations. Diploid cardiomyocytes outcompeted their polyploid neighbors in producing regenerated heart muscle. Moreover, hearts composed of equivalent proportions of diploid and polyploid cardiomyocytes failed to regenerate altogether, demonstrating that a critical percentage of diploid cardiomyocytes is required to achieve heart regeneration. Our data identify cardiomyocyte polyploidization as a barrier to heart regeneration and suggest that mobilizing rare diploid cardiomyocytes in the human heart will improve its regenerative capacity.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - (Canada)
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL127067()

Differential Expression of NF2 in Neuroepithelial Compartments Is Necessary for Mammalian Eye Development.

  • Moon KH
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Jan 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

The optic neuroepithelial continuum of vertebrate eye develops into three differentially growing compartments: the retina, the ciliary margin (CM), and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Neurofibromin 2 (Nf2) is strongly expressed in slowly expanding RPE and CM compartments, and the loss of mouse Nf2 causes hyperplasia in these compartments, replicating the ocular abnormalities seen in human NF2 patients. The hyperplastic ocular phenotypes were largely suppressed by heterozygous deletion of Yap and Taz, key targets of the Nf2-Hippo signaling pathway. We also found that, in addition to feedback transcriptional regulation of Nf2 by Yap/Taz in the CM, activation of Nf2 expression by Mitf in the RPE and suppression by Sox2 in retinal progenitor cells are necessary for the differential growth of the corresponding cell populations. Together, our findings reveal that Nf2 is a key player that orchestrates the differential growth of optic neuroepithelial compartments during vertebrate eye development.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY013760()
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR050772-09(United States)

RANKL/RANK control Brca1 mutation-driven mammary tumors.

  • Sigl V
  • Cell Res.
  • 2017 Dec 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Breast cancer is the most common female cancer, affecting approximately one in eight women during their life-time. Besides environmental triggers and hormones, inherited mutations in the breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) or BRCA2 genes markedly increase the risk for the development of breast cancer. Here, using two different mouse models, we show that genetic inactivation of the key osteoclast differentiation factor RANK in the mammary epithelium markedly delayed onset, reduced incidence, and attenuated progression of Brca1;p53 mutation-driven mammary cancer. Long-term pharmacological inhibition of the RANK ligand RANKL in mice abolished the occurrence of Brca1 mutation-driven pre-neoplastic lesions. Mechanistically, genetic inactivation of Rank or RANKL/RANK blockade impaired proliferation and expansion of both murine Brca1;p53 mutant mammary stem cells and mammary progenitors from human BRCA1 mutation carriers. In addition, genome variations within the RANK locus were significantly associated with risk of developing breast cancer in women with BRCA1 mutations. Thus, RANKL/RANK control progenitor cell expansion and tumorigenesis in inherited breast cancer. These results present a viable strategy for the possible prevention of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutant patients.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - R01RR013438(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007753()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T34 GM008663()

Activation of the STING-Dependent Type I Interferon Response Reduces Microglial Reactivity and Neuroinflammation.

  • Mathur V
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Dec 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Brain aging and neurodegeneration are associated with prominent microglial reactivity and activation of innate immune response pathways, commonly referred to as neuroinflammation. One such pathway, the type I interferon response, recognizes viral or mitochondrial DNA in the cytoplasm via activation of the recently discovered cyclic dinucleotide synthetase cGAS and the cyclic dinucleotide receptor STING. Here we show that the FDA-approved antiviral drug ganciclovir (GCV) induces a type I interferon response independent of its canonical thymidine kinase target. Inhibition of components of the STING pathway, including STING, IRF3, Tbk1, extracellular IFNβ, and the Jak-Stat pathway resulted in reduced activity of GCV and its derivatives. Importantly, functional STING was necessary for GCV to inhibit inflammation in cultured myeloid cells and in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Collectively, our findings uncover an unexpected new activity of GCV and identify the STING pathway as a regulator of microglial reactivity and neuroinflammation.

The Primate-Specific Gene TMEM14B Marks Outer Radial Glia Cells and Promotes Cortical Expansion and Folding.

  • Liu J
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Nov 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Human brain evolution is associated with expansion and folding of the neocortex. Increased diversity in neural progenitor (NP) populations (such as basally located radial glia [RG], which reside in an enlarged outer subventricular zone [OSVZ]) likely contributes to this evolutionary expansion, although their characteristics and relative contributions are only partially understood. Through single-cell transcriptional profiling of sorted human NP subpopulations, we identified the primate-specific TMEM14B gene as a marker of basal RG. Expression of TMEM14B in embryonic NPs induces cortical thickening and gyrification in postnatal mice. This is accompanied by SVZ expansion, the appearance of outer RG-like cells, and the proliferation of multiple NP subsets, with proportional increases in all cortical layers and normal lamination. TMEM14B drives NP proliferation by increasing the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IQGAP1, which in turn promotes G1/S cell cycle transitions. These data show that a single primate-specific gene can drive neurodevelopmental changes that contribute to brain evolution.

Hemodynamic Forces Sculpt Developing Heart Valves through a KLF2-WNT9B Paracrine Signaling Axis.

  • Goddard LM
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Nov 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hemodynamic forces play an essential epigenetic role in heart valve development, but how they do so is not known. Here, we show that the shear-responsive transcription factor KLF2 is required in endocardial cells to regulate the mesenchymal cell responses that remodel cardiac cushions to mature valves. Endocardial Klf2 deficiency results in defective valve formation associated with loss of Wnt9b expression and reduced canonical WNT signaling in neighboring mesenchymal cells, a phenotype reproduced by endocardial-specific loss of Wnt9b. Studies in zebrafish embryos reveal that wnt9b expression is similarly restricted to the endocardial cells overlying the developing heart valves and is dependent upon both hemodynamic shear forces and klf2a expression. These studies identify KLF2-WNT9B signaling as a conserved molecular mechanism by which fluid forces sensed by endothelial cells direct the complex cellular process of heart valve development and suggest that congenital valve defects may arise due to subtle defects in this mechanotransduction pathway.

Funding information:
  • Cancer Research UK - C7845/A10066(United Kingdom)
  • European Research Council - 682938()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL094326()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - T32 HL007954()

Mesenchymal stem cells attenuate MRI-identifiable injury, protect white matter, and improve long-term functional outcomes after neonatal focal stroke in rats.

  • van Velthoven CT
  • J. Neurosci. Res.
  • 2017 Nov 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cell therapy has emerged as a potential treatment for many neurodegenerative diseases including stroke and neonatal ischemic brain injury. Delayed intranasal administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after experimental hypoxia-ischemia and after a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in neonatal rats has shown improvement in long-term functional outcomes, but the effects of MSCs on white matter injury (WMI) are insufficiently understood. In this study we used longitudinal T2-weighted (T2W) and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize chronic injury after tMCAO induced in postnatal day 10 (P10) rats and examined the effects of delayed MSC administration on WMI, axonal coverage, and long-term somatosensory function. We show unilateral injury- and region-dependent changes in diffusion fraction anisotropy 1 and 2 weeks after tMCAO that correspond to accumulation of degraded myelin basic protein, astrocytosis, and decreased axonal coverage. With the use of stringent T2W-based injury criteria at 72 hr after tMCAO to randomize neonatal rats to receive intranasal MSCs or vehicle, we show that a single MSC administration attenuates WMI and enhances somatosensory function 28 days after stroke. A positive correlation was found between MSC-enhanced white matter integrity and functional performance in injured neonatal rats. Collectively, these data indicate that the damage induced by tMCAO progresses over time and is halted by administration of MSCs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Adult newborn neurons interfere with fear discrimination in a protocol-dependent manner.

  • Yu TS
  • Brain Behav
  • 2017 Sep 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Significant enhancement of neurogenesis is known to occur in response to a variety of brain insults such as traumatic brain injury. Previous studies have demonstrated that injury-induced newborn neurons are required for hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory tasks like the Morris water maze, but not in contextual fear conditioning that requires both the hippocampus and amygdala. Recently, the dentate gyrus, where adult hippocampal neurogenesis occurs, has been implicated in processing information to form specific memory under specific environmental stimuli in a process known as pattern separation. METHODS: To test whether injury-induced newborn neurons facilitate pattern separation, hippocampus-dependent contextual fear discrimination was performed using delta-HSV-TK transgenic mice, which can temporally inhibit injury-induced neurogenesis under the control of ganciclovir. RESULTS: We observed that impaired neurogenesis enhanced the ability to distinguish aversive from naïve environments. In addition, this occurs most significantly following injury, but only in a context-dependent manner whereby the sequence of introducing the naïve environment from the aversive one affected the performance differentially. CONCLUSIONS: Temporal impairment of both baseline and injury-induced adult neurogenesis enhances performance in fear discrimination in a context-dependent manner.

Replication Fork Slowing and Reversal upon DNA Damage Require PCNA Polyubiquitination and ZRANB3 DNA Translocase Activity.

  • Vujanovic M
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Sep 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

DNA damage tolerance during eukaryotic replication is orchestrated by PCNA ubiquitination. While monoubiquitination activates mutagenic translesion synthesis, polyubiquitination activates an error-free pathway, elusive in mammals, enabling damage bypass by template switching. Fork reversal is driven in vitro by multiple enzymes, including the DNA translocase ZRANB3, shown to bind polyubiquitinated PCNA. However, whether this interaction promotes fork remodeling and template switching in vivo was unknown. Here we show that damage-induced fork reversal in mammalian cells requires PCNA ubiquitination, UBC13, and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, previously involved in error-free damage tolerance. Fork reversal in vivo also requires ZRANB3 translocase activity and its interaction with polyubiquitinated PCNA, pinpointing ZRANB3 as a key effector of error-free DNA damage tolerance. Mutations affecting fork reversal also induced unrestrained fork progression and chromosomal breakage, suggesting fork remodeling as a global fork slowing and protection mechanism. Targeting these fork protection systems represents a promising strategy to potentiate cancer chemotherapy.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA197774()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM116616()

RADX Promotes Genome Stability and Modulates Chemosensitivity by Regulating RAD51 at Replication Forks.

  • Dungrawala H
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Aug 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

RAD51 promotes homology-directed repair (HDR), replication fork reversal, and stalled fork protection. Defects in these functions cause genomic instability and tumorigenesis but also generate hypersensitivity to cancer therapeutics. Here we describe the identification of RADX as an RPA-like, single-strand DNA binding protein. RADX is recruited to replication forks, where it prevents fork collapse by regulating RAD51. When RADX is inactivated, excessive RAD51 activity slows replication elongation and causes double-strand breaks. In cancer cells lacking BRCA2, RADX deletion restores fork protection without restoring HDR. Furthermore, RADX inactivation confers chemotherapy and PARP inhibitor resistance to cancer cells with reduced BRCA2/RAD51 pathway function. By antagonizing RAD51 at forks, RADX allows cells to maintain a high capacity for HDR while ensuring that replication functions of RAD51 are properly regulated. Thus, RADX is essential to achieve the proper balance of RAD51 activity to maintain genome stability.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01 CA092584()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM116616()

Ciliary Hedgehog Signaling Restricts Injury-Induced Adipogenesis.

  • Kopinke D
  • Cell
  • 2017 Jul 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

Injured skeletal muscle regenerates, but with age or in muscular dystrophies, muscle is replaced by fat. Upon injury, muscle-resident fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) proliferated and gave rise to adipocytes. These FAPs dynamically produced primary cilia, structures that transduce intercellular cues such as Hedgehog (Hh) signals. Genetically removing cilia from FAPs inhibited intramuscular adipogenesis, both after injury and in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Blocking FAP ciliation also enhanced myofiber regeneration after injury and reduced myofiber size decline in the muscular dystrophy model. Hh signaling through FAP cilia regulated the expression of TIMP3, a secreted metalloproteinase inhibitor, that inhibited MMP14 to block adipogenesis. A pharmacological mimetic of TIMP3 blocked the conversion of FAPs into adipocytes, pointing to a strategy to combat fatty degeneration of skeletal muscle. We conclude that ciliary Hh signaling by FAPs orchestrates the regenerative response to skeletal muscle injury.

Funding information:
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR054396()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM095941()

BACE1 Deficiency Causes Abnormal Neuronal Clustering in the Dentate Gyrus.

  • Hou H
  • Stem Cell Reports
  • 2017 Jul 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACE1 is validated as Alzheimer's β-secretase and a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease. In examining BACE1-null mice, we discovered that BACE1 deficiency develops abnormal clusters of immature neurons, forming doublecortin-positive neuroblasts, in the developing dentate gyrus, mainly in the subpial zone (SPZ). Such clusters were rarely observed in wild-type SPZ and not reported in other mouse models. To understand their origins and fates, we examined how neuroblasts in BACE1-null SPZ mature and migrate during early postnatal development. We show that such neuroblasts are destined to form Prox1-positive granule cells in the dentate granule cell layer, and mainly mature to form excitatory neurons, but not inhibitory neurons. Mechanistically, higher levels of reelin potentially contribute to abnormal neurogenesis and timely migration in BACE1-null SPZ. Altogether, we demonstrate that BACE1 is a critical regulator in forming the dentate granule cell layer through timely maturation and migration of SPZ neuroblasts.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG046929()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS074256()

3D Chromatin Structures of Mature Gametes and Structural Reprogramming during Mammalian Embryogenesis.

  • Ke Y
  • Cell
  • 2017 Jul 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

High-order chromatin structure plays important roles in gene expression regulation. Knowledge of the dynamics of 3D chromatin structures during mammalian embryo development remains limited. We report the 3D chromatin architecture of mouse gametes and early embryos using an optimized Hi-C method with low-cell samples. We find that mature oocytes at the metaphase II stage do not have topologically associated domains (TADs). In sperm, extra-long-range interactions (>4 Mb) and interchromosomal interactions occur frequently. The high-order structures of both the paternal and maternal genomes in zygotes and two-cell embryos are obscure but are gradually re-established through development. The establishment of the TAD structure requires DNA replication but not zygotic genome activation. Furthermore, unmethylated CpGs are enriched in A compartment, and methylation levels are decreased to a greater extent in A compartment than in B compartment in embryos. In summary, the global reprogramming of chromatin architecture occurs during early mammalian development.

An FAK-YAP-mTOR Signaling Axis Regulates Stem Cell-Based Tissue Renewal in Mice.

  • Hu JK
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Jul 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Tissue homeostasis requires the production of newly differentiated cells from resident adult stem cells. Central to this process is the expansion of undifferentiated intermediates known as transit-amplifying (TA) cells, but how stem cells are triggered to enter this proliferative TA state remains an important open question. Using the continuously growing mouse incisor as a model of stem cell-based tissue renewal, we found that the transcriptional cofactors YAP and TAZ are required both to maintain TA cell proliferation and to inhibit differentiation. Specifically, we identified a pathway involving activation of integrin α3 in TA cells that signals through an LATS-independent FAK/CDC42/PP1A cascade to control YAP-S397 phosphorylation and nuclear localization. This leads to Rheb expression and potentiates mTOR signaling to drive the proliferation of TA cells. These findings thus reveal a YAP/TAZ signaling mechanism that coordinates stem cell expansion and differentiation during organ renewal.

Funding information:
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - F32 DE023705()
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - K99 DE025874()
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - R01 DE024988()
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - R35 DE026602()

Persistent Expression of VCAM1 in Radial Glial Cells Is Required for the Embryonic Origin of Postnatal Neural Stem Cells.

  • Hu XL
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Jul 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

During development, neural stem cells (NSCs) undergo transitions from neuroepithelial cells to radial glial cells (RGCs), and later, a subpopulation of slowly dividing RGCs gives rise to the quiescent adult NSCs that populate the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ). Here we show that VCAM1, a transmembrane protein previously found in quiescent adult NSCs, is expressed by a subpopulation of embryonic RGCs, in a temporal and region-specific manner. Loss of VCAM1 reduced the number of active embryonic RGCs by stimulating their premature neuronal differentiation while preventing quiescence in the slowly dividing RGCs. This in turn diminished the embryonic origin of postnatal NSCs, resulting in loss of adult NSCs and defective V-SVZ regeneration. VCAM1 affects the NSC fate by signaling through its intracellular domain to regulate β-catenin signaling in a context-dependent manner. Our findings provide new insight on how stem cells in the embryo are preserved to meet the need for growth and regeneration.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R37 NS019904(United States)

Short-Term Depression of Sprouted Mossy Fiber Synapses from Adult-Born Granule Cells.

  • Hendricks WD
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Jun 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

Epileptic seizures potently modulate hippocampal adult neurogenesis, and adult-born dentate granule cells contribute to the pathologic retrograde sprouting of mossy fiber axons, both hallmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy. The characteristics of these sprouted synapses, however, have been largely unexplored, and the specific contribution of adult-born granule cells to functional mossy fiber sprouting is unknown, primarily due to technical barriers in isolating sprouted mossy fiber synapses for analysis. Here, we used DcxCreERT2 transgenic mice to permanently pulse-label age-defined cohorts of granule cells born either before or after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Using optogenetics, we demonstrate that adult-born granule cells born before SE form functional recurrent monosynaptic excitatory connections with other granule cells. Surprisingly, however, although healthy mossy fiber synapses in CA3 are well characterized "detonator" synapses that potently drive postsynaptic cell firing through their profound frequency-dependent facilitation, sprouted mossy fiber synapses from adult-born cells exhibited profound frequency-dependent depression, despite possessing some of the morphological hallmarks of mossy fiber terminals. Mature granule cells also contributed to functional mossy fiber sprouting, but exhibited less synaptic depression. Interestingly, granule cells born shortly after SE did not form functional excitatory synapses, despite robust sprouting. Our results suggest that, although sprouted mossy fibers form recurrent excitatory circuits with some of the morphological characteristics of typical mossy fiber terminals, the functional characteristics of sprouted synapses would limit the contribution of adult-born granule cells to hippocampal hyperexcitability in the epileptic hippocampus.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the hippocampal dentate gyrus, seizures drive retrograde sprouting of granule cell mossy fiber axons. We directly activated sprouted mossy fiber synapses from adult-born granule cells to study their synaptic properties. We reveal that sprouted synapses from adult-born granule cells have a diminished ability to sustain recurrent excitation in the epileptic hippocampus, which raises questions about the role of sprouting and adult neurogenesis in sustaining seizure-like activity.

Funding information:
  • BLRD VA - I01 BX002949()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - F31 NS098597()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - P30 NS061800()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS080979()

Pasireotide Therapy of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1-Associated Neuroendocrine Tumors in Female Mice Deleted for an Men1 Allele Improves Survival and Reduces Tumor Progression.

  • Walls GV
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Jun 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Pasireotide, a somatostatin analog, is reported to have anti-proliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). We therefore assessed the efficacy of pasireotide for treating pancreatic and pituitary NETs that develop in a mouse model of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). Men1(+/-) mice were treated from age 12 mo with 40 mg/kg pasireotide long-acting release formulation, or PBS, intramuscularly monthly for 9 mo. The Men1(+/-) mice had magnetic resonance imaging at 12 and 21 mo, and from 20 mo oral 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine for 1 mo, to assess tumor development and proliferation, respectively. NETs were collected at age 21 mo, and proliferation and apoptosis assessed by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assays, respectively. Pasireotide-treated Men1(+/-) mice had increased survival (pasireotide, 80.9% vs PBS, 65.2%; P < .05), with fewer mice developing pancreatic NETs (pasireotide, 86.9% vs PBS, 96.9%; P < .05) and smaller increases in pituitary NET volumes (pre-treated vs post-treated, 0.803 ± 0.058 mm(3) vs 2.872 ± 0.728 mm(3) [pasireotide] compared with 0.844 ± 0.066 mm(3) vs 8.847 ±1.948 mm(3) [PBS]; P < .01). In addition, pasireotide-treated mice had fewer pancreatic NETs compared with PBS-treated mice (2.36 ± 0.25 vs 3.72 ± 0.32, respectively; P < .001), with decreased proliferation in pancreatic NETs (pasireotide, 0.35 ± 0.03% vs PBS, 0.78 ± 0.08%; P < .0001) and pituitary NETs (pasireotide, 0.73 ±0.07% vs PBS, 1.81 ± 0.15%; P < .0001), but increased apoptosis in pancreatic NETs (pasireotide, 0.42 ± 0.05% vs PBS, 0.19 ± 0.03%; P < .001) and pituitary NETs (pasireotide, 14.75 ± 1.58% vs PBS, 2.35 ± 0.44%; P < .001). Thus, pasireotide increased survival and inhibited pancreatic and pituitary NET growth, thereby indicating its potential as an anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic therapy.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R21NS073585-01A1(United States)

A Class of Environmental and Endogenous Toxins Induces BRCA2 Haploinsufficiency and Genome Instability.

  • Tan SLW
  • Cell
  • 2017 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mutations truncating a single copy of the tumor suppressor, BRCA2, cause cancer susceptibility. In cells bearing such heterozygous mutations, we find that a cellular metabolite and ubiquitous environmental toxin, formaldehyde, stalls and destabilizes DNA replication forks, engendering structural chromosomal aberrations. Formaldehyde selectively depletes BRCA2 via proteasomal degradation, a mechanism of toxicity that affects very few additional cellular proteins. Heterozygous BRCA2 truncations, by lowering pre-existing BRCA2 expression, sensitize to BRCA2 haploinsufficiency induced by transient exposure to natural concentrations of formaldehyde. Acetaldehyde, an alcohol catabolite detoxified by ALDH2, precipitates similar effects. Ribonuclease H1 ameliorates replication fork instability and chromosomal aberrations provoked by aldehyde-induced BRCA2 haploinsufficiency, suggesting that BRCA2 inactivation triggers spontaneous mutagenesis during DNA replication via aberrant RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops). These findings suggest a model wherein carcinogenesis in BRCA2 mutation carriers can be incited by compounds found pervasively in the environment and generated endogenously in certain tissues with implications for public health.

TCF7L1 promotes skin tumorigenesis independently of β-catenin through induction of LCN2.

  • Ku AT
  • Elife
  • 2017 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

The transcription factor TCF7L1 is an embryonic stem cell signature gene that is upregulated in multiple aggressive cancer types, but its role in skin tumorigenesis has not yet been defined. Here we document TCF7L1 upregulation in skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and demonstrate that TCF7L1 overexpression increases tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity, and malignant progression in the chemically induced mouse model of skin SCC. Additionally, we show that downregulation of TCF7L1 and its paralogue TCF7L2 reduces tumor growth in a xenograft model of human skin SCC. Using separation-of-function mutants, we show that TCF7L1 promotes tumor growth, enhances cell migration, and overrides oncogenic RAS-induced senescence independently of its interaction with β-catenin. Through transcriptome profiling and combined gain- and loss-of-function studies, we identified LCN2 as a major downstream effector of TCF7L1 that drives tumor growth. Our findings establish a tumor-promoting role for TCF7L1 in skin and elucidate the mechanisms underlying its tumorigenic capacity.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA016672()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA125123()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA194062()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA194617()
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10 RR024574()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - T32 HL092332()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - P30 AI036211()
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC00189.(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM088129()

A MEN1 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour mouse model under temporal control.

  • Lines KE
  • Endocr Connect
  • 2017 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by occurrence of parathyroid tumours and neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the pancreatic islets and anterior pituitary. The MEN1 gene, encoding menin, is a tumour suppressor, but its precise role in initiating in vivo tumourigenesis remains to be elucidated. The availability of a temporally controlled conditional MEN1 mouse model would greatly facilitate the study of such early tumourigenic events, and overcome the limitations of other MEN1 knockout models, in which menin is lost from conception or tumour development occurs asynchronously. To generate a temporally controlled conditional mouse model, we crossbred mice with the MEN1 gene floxed by LoxP sites (Men1L/L ), and mice expressing tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase under the control of the rat insulin promoter (RIP2-CreER), to establish a pancreatic β-cell-specific NET model under temporal control (Men1L/L /RIP2-CreER). Men1L/L /RIP2-CreER mice aged ~3 months were given tamoxifen in the diet for 5 days, and pancreata harvested 2-2.5, 2.9-3.5 and 4.5-5.5 months later. Control mice did not express Cre and did not receive tamoxifen. Immunostaining of pancreata from tamoxifen-treated Men1L/L /RIP2-CreER mice, compared to control mice, showed at all ages: loss of menin in all islets; increased islet area (>4.2-fold); increased proliferation of insulin immunostaining β-cells (>2.3-fold) and decreased proliferation of glucagon immunostaining α-cells (>1.7-fold). There were no gender and apoptotic or proliferation differences, and extra-pancreatic tumours were not detected. Thus, we have established a mouse model (Men1L/L /RIP2-CreER) to study early events in the development of pancreatic β-cell NETs.

Distinct migratory behaviors of striosome and matrix cells underlying the mosaic formation in the developing striatum.

  • Hagimoto K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2017 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The striatum, the largest nucleus of the basal ganglia controlling motor and cognitive functions, can be characterized by a labyrinthine mosaic organization of striosome/matrix compartments. It is unclear how striosome/matrix mosaic formation is spatially and temporally controlled at the cellular level during striatal development. Here, by combining in vivo electroporation and brain slice cultures, we set up a prospective experimental system in which we differentially labeled striosome and matrix cells from the time of birth and followed their distributions and migratory behaviors. Our results showed that, at an initial stage of striosome/matrix mosaic formation, striosome cells were mostly stationary, whereas matrix cells actively migrated in multiple directions regardless of the presence of striosome cells. The mostly stationary striosome cells were still able to associate to form patchy clusters via attractive interactions. Our results suggest that the restricted migratory capability of striosome cells may allow them to cluster together only when they happen to be located in close proximity to each other and are not separated by actively migrating matrix cells. The way in which the mutidirectionally migrating matrix cells intermingle with the mostly stationary striosome cells may therefore determine the topographic features of striosomes. At later stages, the actively migrating matrix cells began to repulse the patchy clusters of striosomes, presumably enhancing the striosome cluster formation and the segregation and eventual formation of dichotomous homogeneous striosome/matrix compartments. Overall, our study reveals temporally distinct migratory behaviors of striosome/matrix cells, which may underlie the sequential steps of mosaic formation in the developing striatum. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:794-817, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Perinatal Exposure to Low-Dose Bisphenol-A Disrupts the Structural and Functional Development of the Hypothalamic Feeding Circuitry.

  • MacKay H
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a component of polycarbonate and other plastics to which humans are regularly exposed at low levels. BPA is characterized as an endocrine disruptor because of observations of its estrogenic activity in various experimental models. We have previously shown evidence of disrupted hypothalamic feeding circuitry and leptin sensitivity in adult BPA-exposed animals subjected to a high-fat diet, but because these animals were already exhibiting a diet-induced obese phenotype, we could not rule out the possibility that these observations were simply consequences of the obesity, not a preexisting phenotype produced by BPA exposure. Here, we studied leptin sensitivity and hypothalamic structure in young BPA-exposed animals before the onset of a body weight or metabolic phenotype. Pregnant and lactating CD-1 mice were exposed to either BPA or diethylstilbestrol (DES) at low, environmentally relevant doses via their diet. Studies of leptin function and neurobiology were conducted on offspring at several time points. Young adult offspring from this experiment were resistant to leptin-induced suppression of food intake, body weight loss, and hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) upregulation. Both male and female BPA-exposed mice showed a reduced density of POMC projections into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). BPA- and DES-exposed pups had respectively delayed and blunted postnatal leptin surges, and POMC projections into the PVN were rescued in female BPA-exposed animals given daily injections of supplemental leptin. Our findings suggest that BPA, a putative obesogen, may exert its effects through developmental programming of the hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry, permanently altering the neurobiology of metabolic homeostasis.

Time-Specific Effects of Spindle Positioning on Embryonic Progenitor Pool Composition and Adult Neural Stem Cell Seeding.

  • Falk S
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Feb 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

The developmental mechanisms regulating the number of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) are largely unknown. Here we show that the cleavage plane orientation in murine embryonic radial glia cells (RGCs) regulates the number of aNSCs in the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE). Randomizing spindle orientation in RGCs by overexpression of Insc or a dominant-negative form of Lgn (dnLgn) reduces the frequency of self-renewing asymmetric divisions while favoring symmetric divisions generating two SNPs. Importantly, these changes during embryonic development result in reduced seeding of aNSCs. Interestingly, no effects on aNSC numbers were observed when Insc was overexpressed in postnatal RGCs or aNSCs. These data suggest a new mechanism for controlling aNSC numbers and show that the role of spindle orientation during brain development is highly time and region dependent.

A Surveillance Mechanism Ensures Repair of DNA Lesions during Zygotic Reprogramming.

  • Ladstätter S
  • Cell
  • 2016 Dec 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Sexual reproduction culminates in a totipotent zygote with the potential to produce a whole organism. Sperm chromatin reorganization and epigenetic reprogramming that alter DNA and histone modifications generate a totipotent embryo. Active DNA demethylation of the paternal genome has been proposed to involve base excision and DNA repair-based mechanisms. The nature and consequence of DNA lesions generated during reprogramming are not known. Using mouse genetics and chemical biology, we discovered that Tet3-dependent zygotic reprogramming generates paternal DNA lesions that are monitored by a surveillance mechanism. In vivo structure-function rescue assays revealed that cohesin-dependent repair of paternal DNA lesions prevents activation of a Chk1-dependent checkpoint that delays mitotic entry. Culturing conditions affect checkpoint stringency, which has implications for human in vitro fertilization. We propose the zygotic checkpoint senses DNA lesions generated during paternal DNA demethylation and ensures reprogrammed loci are repaired before mitosis to prevent chromosome fragmentation, embryo loss, and infertility.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL070029(United States)

Embryonic origin and lineage hierarchies of the neural progenitor subtypes building the zebrafish adult midbrain.

  • Galant S
  • Dev. Biol.
  • 2016 Dec 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neurogenesis in the post-embryonic vertebrate brain varies in extent and efficiency between species and brain territories. Distinct neurogenesis modes may account for this diversity, and several neural progenitor subtypes, radial glial cells (RG) and neuroepithelial progenitors (NE), have been identified in the adult zebrafish brain. The neurogenic sequences issued from these progenitors, and their contribution to brain construction, remain incompletely understood. Here we use genetic tracing techniques based on conditional Cre recombination and Tet-On neuronal birthdating to unravel the neurogenic sequence operating from NE progenitors in the zebrafish post-embryonic optic tectum. We reveal that a subpopulation of her5-positive NE cells of the posterior midbrain layer stands at the top of a neurogenic hierarchy involving, in order, the amplification pool of the tectal proliferation zone (TPZ), followed by her4-positive RG cells with transient neurogenic activity. We further demonstrate that the adult her5-positive NE pool is issued in lineage from an identically located NE pool expressing the same gene in the embryonic neural tube. Finally, we show that these features are reminiscent of the neurogenic sequence and embryonic origin of the her9-positive progenitor NE pool involved in the construction of the lateral pallium at post-embryonic stages. Together, our results highlight the shared recruitment of an identical neurogenic strategy by two remote brain territories, where long-lasting NE pools serve both as a growth zone and as the life-long source of young neurogenic RG cells.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - BBD5231861(United Kingdom)

Decreased adult neurogenesis in hibernating Syrian hamster.

  • León-Espinosa G
  • Neuroscience
  • 2016 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Generation of new neurons from adult neural stem cells occurs in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the lateral walls of the lateral ventricles. In this article, we study the neurogenesis that takes place during the hibernation of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Using a variety of standard neurogenesis markers and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, we describe a preferential decrease in the proliferation of newborn neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the hibernating hamsters (torpor) rather than in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proliferative capacity is recovered after 3-4days of torpor when arousal is triggered under natural conditions (i.e., not artificially provoked). In addition, we show that tau3R, a tau isoform with three microtubule-binding domains, is a suitable marker to study neurogenesis both in the SVZ and subgranular zone (SGZ) of the Syrian hamster brain.

A Subtype of Olfactory Bulb Interneurons Is Required for Odor Detection and Discrimination Behaviors.

  • Takahashi H
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2016 Aug 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neural circuits that undergo reorganization by newborn interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) are necessary for odor detection and discrimination, olfactory memory, and innate olfactory responses, including predator avoidance and sexual behaviors. The OB possesses many interneurons, including various types of granule cells (GCs); however, the contribution that each type of interneuron makes to olfactory behavioral control remains unknown. Here, we investigated the in vivo functional role of oncofetal trophoblast glycoprotein 5T4, a regulator for dendritic arborization of 5T4-expressing GCs (5T4 GCs), the level of which is reduced in the OB of 5T4 knock-out (KO) mice. Electrophysiological recordings with acute OB slices indicated that external tufted cells (ETCs) can be divided into two types, bursting and nonbursting. Optogenetic stimulation of 5T4 GCs revealed their connection to both bursting and nonbursting ETCs, as well as to mitral cells (MCs). Interestingly, nonbursting ETCs received fewer inhibitory inputs from GCs in 5T4 KO mice than from those in wild-type (WT) mice, whereas bursting ETCs and MCs received similar inputs in both mice. Furthermore, 5T4 GCs received significantly fewer excitatory inputs in 5T4 KO mice. Remarkably, in olfactory behavior tests, 5T4 KO mice had higher odor detection thresholds than the WT, as well as defects in odor discrimination learning. Therefore, the loss of 5T4 attenuates inhibitory inputs from 5T4 GCs to nonbursting ETCs and excitatory inputs to 5T4 GCs, contributing to disturbances in olfactory behavior. Our novel findings suggest that, among the various types of OB interneurons, the 5T4 GC subtype is required for odor detection and discrimination behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: Neuronal circuits in the brain include glutamatergic principal neurons and GABAergic interneurons. Although the latter is a minority cell type, they are vital for normal brain function because they regulate the activity of principal neurons. If interneuron function is impaired, brain function may be damaged, leading to behavior disorder. The olfactory bulb (OB) possesses various types of interneurons, including granule cells (GCs); however, the contribution that each type of interneuron makes to the control of olfactory behavior remains unknown. Here, we analyzed electrophysiologically and behaviorally the function of oncofetal trophoblast glycoprotein 5T4, a regulator for dendritic branching in OB GCs. We found that, among the various types of OB interneuron, the 5T4 GC subtype is required for odor detection and odor discrimination behaviors.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY025555(United States)

A Novel and Multivalent Role of Pax6 in Cerebellar Development.

  • Yeung J
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2016 Aug 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Pax6 is a prominent gene in brain development. The deletion of Pax6 results in devastated development of eye, olfactory bulb, and cortex. However, it has been reported that the Pax6-null Sey cerebellum only has minor defects involving granule cells despite Pax6 being expressed throughout cerebellar development. The present work has uncovered a requirement of Pax6 in the development of all rhombic lip (RL) lineages. A significant downregulation of Tbr1 and Tbr2 expression is found in the Sey cerebellum, these are cell-specific markers of cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons and unipolar brush cells (UBCs), respectively. The examination of Tbr1 and Lmx1a immunolabeling and Nissl staining confirmed the loss of CN neurons from the Sey cerebellum. CN neuron progenitors are produced in the mutant but there is an enhanced death of these neurons as shown by increased presence of caspase-3-positive cells. These data indicate that Pax6 regulates the survival of CN neuron progenitors. Furthermore, the analysis of experimental mouse chimeras suggests a cell-extrinsic role of Pax6 in CN neuron survival. For UBCs, using Tbr2 immunolabeling, these cells are significantly reduced in the Sey cerebellum. The loss of UBCs in the mutant is due partly to cell death in the RL and also to the reduced production of progenitors from the RL. These results demonstrate a critical role for Pax6 in regulating the generation and survival of UBCs. This and previous work from our laboratory demonstrate a seminal role of Pax6 in the development of all cerebellar glutamatergic neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: Pax6 is a key molecule in development. Pax6 is best known as the master control gene in eye development with mutations causing aniridia in humans. Pax6 also plays important developmental roles in the cortex and olfactory bulb. During cerebellar development, Pax6 is robustly expressed in the germinal zone of all glutamatergic neurons [cerebellar nuclear (CN) neurons, granule cells, and unipolar brush cells (UBCs)]. Past work has not found abnormalities in the CN and UBC populations. Our study reveals that the Pax6-null mutation dramatically affects these cells and identifies Pax6 as a key regulator of cell survival in CN neurons and of cell production in UBCs. The present study shows how Pax6 is key to the development of glutamatergic cells in the cerebellum.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - 101253/Z/13/Z(United Kingdom)

Simultaneous Detection of Both GDNF and GFRα1 Expression Patterns in the Mouse Central Nervous System.

  • Ortega-de San Luis C
  • Front Neuroanat
  • 2016 Jul 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is proposed as a therapeutic tool in Parkinson's disease, addiction-related disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions affecting motor neurons (MNs). Despite the high amount of work about GDNF therapeutic application, the neuronal circuits requiring GDNF trophic support in the brain and spinal cord (SC) are poorly characterized. Here, we defined GDNF and GDNF family receptor-α 1 (GFRα1) expression pattern in the brain and SC of newborn and adult mice. We performed systematic and simultaneous detection of EGFP and LacZ expressing alleles in reporter mice and asked whether modifications of this signaling pathway lead to a significant central nervous system (CNS) alteration. GFRα1 was predominantly expressed by neurons but also by an unexpected population of non-neuronal cells. GFRα1 expression pattern was wider in neonatal than in adult CNS and GDNF expression was restricted in comparison with GFRα1 at both developmental time points. The use of confocal microscopy to imaging X-gal deposits and EGFP allowed us to identify regions containing cells that expressed both proteins and to discriminate between auto and non-autotrophic signaling. We also suggested long-range GDNF-GFRα1 circuits taking advantage of the ability of the EGFP genetically encoded reporter to label long distance projecting axons. The complete elimination of either the ligand or the receptor during development did not produce major abnormalities, suggesting a preponderant role for GDNF signaling during adulthood. In the SC, our results pointed to local modulatory interneurons as the main target of GDNF produced by Clarke's column (CC) cells. Our work increases the understanding on how GDNF signals in the CNS and establish a crucial framework for posterior studies addressing either the biological role of GDNF or the optimization of trophic factor-based therapies.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - EY002520(United States)

Delayed application of the haematopoietic growth factors G-CSF/SCF and FL reduces neonatal excitotoxic brain injury.

  • Neubauer V
  • Brain Res.
  • 2016 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Developmental brain injury results in cognitive and motor deficits in the preterm infant. Enhanced glutamate release and subsequent receptor activation are major pathogenetic factors. The effect of haematopoietic growth factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), stem cell factor (SCF) and flt-3 ligand (FL) on neonatal brain injury is controversially discussed. Timing of treatment is known to be a crucial factor. Based on the hypothesis that an exacerbation of injury is caused by administration of substances in the acute phase, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of delayed administration of G-CSF/SCF and FL to protect against excitotoxic brain injury in vivo. METHODS: In an established neonatal mouse model of excitotoxic brain injury, we evaluated the effect of daily intraperitoneal doses of G-CSF/SCF or FL, starting 60 h after the excitotoxic insult. RESULTS: Intraperitoneal injections of G-CSF/SCF and FL, given 60 h after the excitotoxic insult, significantly reduced lesion size at postnatal days 10, 18 and 90. G-CSF/SCF treatment resulted in a decrease in apoptotic cell death indicated by reduced caspase-3 activation. G-CSF/SCF and FL treatment did not affect apoptosis-inducing factor-dependent apoptosis or cell proliferation. CONCLUSION: We show that delayed systemic treatment with the haematopoietic growth factors G-CSF/SCF and FL protects against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated developmental excitotoxic brain damage. Our results suggest that neuroprotective effects in this neonatal animal model of excitotoxic brain injury depend on the timing of drug administration after the insult.

Prolactin as an Adjunct for Type 1 Diabetes Immunotherapy.

  • Hyslop CM
  • Endocrinology
  • 2016 Jan 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells. Although immunotherapy can restore self-tolerance thereby halting continued immune-mediated β-cell loss, residual β-cell mass and function is often insufficient for normoglycemia. Using a growth factor to boost β-cell mass can potentially overcome this barrier and prolactin (PRL) may fill this role. Previous studies have shown that PRL can stimulate β-cell proliferation and up-regulate insulin synthesis and secretion while reducing lymphocytic infiltration of islets, suggesting that it may restore normoglycemia through complementary mechanisms. Here, we test the hypothesis that PRL can improve the efficacy of an immune modulator, the anticluster of differentiation 3 monoclonal antibody (aCD3), in inducing diabetes remission by up-regulating β-cell mass and function. Diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were treated with a 5-day course of aCD3 with or without a concurrent 3-week course of PRL. We found that a higher proportion of diabetic mice treated with the aCD3 and PRL combined therapy achieved diabetes reversal than those treated with aCD3 alone. The aCD3 and PRL combined group had a higher β-cell proliferation rate, an increased β-cell fraction, larger islets, higher pancreatic insulin content, and greater glucose-stimulated insulin release. Lineage-tracing analysis found minimal contribution of β-cell neogenesis to the formation of new β-cells. Although we did not detect a significant difference in the number or proliferative capacity of T cells, we observed a higher proportion of insulitis-free islets in the aCD3 and PRL group. These results suggest that combining a growth factor with an immunotherapy may be an effective treatment paradigm for autoimmune diabetes.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - EY 15224(United States)

Neural crest requires Impdh2 for development of the enteric nervous system, great vessels, and craniofacial skeleton.

  • Lake JI
  • Dev. Biol.
  • 2016 Jan 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mutations that impair the proliferation of enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCDC) cause Hirschsprung disease, a potentially lethal birth defect where the enteric nervous system (ENS) is absent from distal bowel. Inosine 5' monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity is essential for de novo GMP synthesis, and chemical inhibition of IMPDH induces Hirschsprung disease-like pathology in mouse models by reducing ENCDC proliferation. Two IMPDH isoforms are ubiquitously expressed in the embryo, but only IMPDH2 is required for life. To further understand the role of IMPDH2 in ENS and neural crest development, we characterized a conditional Impdh2 mutant mouse. Deletion of Impdh2 in the early neural crest using the Wnt1-Cre transgene produced defects in multiple neural crest derivatives including highly penetrant intestinal aganglionosis, agenesis of the craniofacial skeleton, and cardiac outflow tract and great vessel malformations. Analysis using a Rosa26 reporter mouse suggested that some or all of the remaining ENS in Impdh2 conditional-knockout animals was derived from cells that escaped Wnt1-Cre mediated DNA recombination. These data suggest that IMPDH2 mediated guanine nucleotide synthesis is essential for normal development of the ENS and other neural crest derivatives.

Intraislet Pancreatic Ducts Can Give Rise to Insulin-Positive Cells.

  • El-Gohary Y
  • Endocrinology
  • 2016 Jan 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

A key question in diabetes research is whether new β-cells can be derived from endogenous, nonendocrine cells. The potential for pancreatic ductal cells to convert into β-cells is a highly debated issue. To date, it remains unclear what anatomical process would result in duct-derived cells coming to exist within preexisting islets. We used a whole-mount technique to directly visualize the pancreatic ductal network in young wild-type mice, young humans, and wild-type and transgenic mice after partial pancreatectomy. Pancreatic ductal networks, originating from the main ductal tree, were found to reside deep within islets in young mice and humans but not in mature mice or humans. These networks were also not present in normal adult mice after partial pancreatectomy, but TGF-β receptor mutant mice demonstrated formation of these intraislet duct structures after partial pancreatectomy. Genetic and viral lineage tracings were used to determine whether endocrine cells were derived from pancreatic ducts. Lineage tracing confirmed that pancreatic ductal cells can typically convert into new β-cells in normal young developing mice as well as in adult TGF-β signaling mutant mice after partial pancreatectomy. Here the direct visual evidence of ducts growing into islets, along with lineage tracing, not only represents strong evidence for duct cells giving rise to β-cells in the postnatal pancreas but also importantly implicates TGF-β signaling in this process.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - U01 GM107623(United States)

Mice lacking circadian clock components display different mood-related behaviors and do not respond uniformly to chronic lithium treatment.

  • Schnell A
  • Chronobiol. Int.
  • 2015 Oct 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Genomic studies suggest an association of circadian clock genes with bipolar disorder (BD) and lithium response in humans. Therefore, we tested mice mutant in various clock genes before and after lithium treatment in the forced swim test (FST), a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of depressive-like states. We find that expression of circadian clock components, including Per2, Cry1 and Rev-erbα, is affected by lithium treatment, and thus, these clock components may contribute to the beneficial effects of lithium therapy. In particular, we observed that Cry1 is important at specific times of the day to transmit lithium-mediated effects. Interestingly, the pathways involving Per2 and Cry1, which regulate the behavior in the FST and the response to lithium, are distinct as evidenced by the phosphorylation of GSK3β after lithium treatment and the modulation of dopamine levels in the striatum. Furthermore, we observed the co-existence of depressive and mania-like symptoms in Cry1 knock-out mice, which resembles the so-called mixed state seen in BD patients. Taken together our results strengthen the concept that a defective circadian timing system may impact directly or indirectly on mood-related behaviors.

Dopaminergic Neurons Controlling Anterior Pituitary Functions: Anatomy and Ontogenesis in Zebrafish.

  • Fontaine R
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Aug 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dopaminergic (DA) neurons located in the preoptico-hypothalamic region of the brain exert a major neuroendocrine control on reproduction, growth, and homeostasis by regulating the secretion of anterior pituitary (or adenohypophysis) hormones. Here, using a retrograde tract tracing experiment, we identified the neurons playing this role in the zebrafish. The DA cells projecting directly to the anterior pituitary are localized in the most anteroventral part of the preoptic area, and we named them preoptico-hypophyseal DA (POHDA) neurons. During development, these neurons do not appear before 72 hours postfertilization (hpf) and are the last dopaminergic cell group to differentiate. We found that the number of neurons in this cell population continues to increase throughout life proportionally to the growth of the fish. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation analysis suggested that this increase is due to continuous neurogenesis and not due to a phenotypic change in already-existing neurons. Finally, expression profiles of several genes (foxg1a, dlx2a, and nr4a2a/b) were different in the POHDA compared with the adjacent suprachiasmatic DA neurons, suggesting that POHDA neurons develop as a distinct DA cell population in the preoptic area. This study offers some insights into the regional identity of the preoptic area and provides the first bases for future functional genetic studies on the development of DA neurons controlling anterior pituitary functions.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC00189(United States)
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK063608(United States)

A Novel Population of Inner Cortical Cells in the Adrenal Gland That Displays Sexually Dimorphic Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β1.

  • Huang CC
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Jun 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

The development of the adrenal cortex involves the formation and then subsequent regression of immature or fetal inner cell layers as the mature steroidogenic outer layers expand. However, controls over this remodeling, especially in the immature inner layer, are incompletely understood. Here we identify an inner cortical cell population that expresses thyroid hormone receptor-β1 (TRβ1), one of two receptor isoforms encoded by the Thrb gene. Using mice with a Thrb(b1) reporter allele that expresses lacZ instead of TRβ1, β-galactosidase was detected in the inner cortex from early stages. Expression peaked at juvenile ages in an inner zone that included cells expressing 20-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, a marker of the transient, so-called X-zone in mice. The β-galactosidase-positive zone displayed sexually dimorphic regression in males after approximately 4 weeks of age but persisted in females into adulthood in either nulliparous or parous states. T3 treatment promoted hypertrophy of inner cortical cells, induced some markers of mature cortical cells, and, in males, delayed the regression of the TRβ1-positive zone, suggesting that TRβ1 could partly divert the differentiation fate and counteract male-specific regression of inner zone cells. TRβ1-deficient mice were resistant to these actions of T3, supporting a functional role for TRβ1 in the inner cortex.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM102253(United States)

Social interaction rescues memory deficit in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease by increasing BDNF-dependent hippocampal neurogenesis.

  • Hsiao YH
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2014 Dec 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

It has been recognized that the risk of cognitive decline during aging can be reduced if one maintains strong social connections, yet the neural events underlying this beneficial effect have not been rigorously studied. Here, we show that amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) double-transgenic (APP/PS1) mice demonstrate improvement in memory after they are cohoused with wild-type mice. The improvement was associated with increased protein and mRNA levels of BDNF in the hippocampus. Concomitantly, the number of BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly elevated after cohousing. Methylazoxymethanol acetate, a cell proliferation blocker, markedly reduced BrdU(+) and BrdU/NeuN(+) cells and abolished the effect of social interaction. Selective ablation of mitotic neurons using diphtheria toxin (DT) and a retrovirus vector encoding DT receptor abolished the beneficial effect of cohousing. Knockdown of BDNF by shRNA transfection blocked, whereas overexpression of BDNF mimicked the memory-improving effect. A tropomyosin-related kinase B agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, occluded the effect of social interaction. These results demonstrate that increased BDNF expression and neurogenesis in the hippocampus after cohousing underlie the reversal of memory deficit in APP/PS1 mice.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY020578(United States)
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - R01 DE023090(United States)

Four-dimensional analysis of nucleogenesis of the pontine nucleus in the hindbrain.

  • Shinohara M
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2013 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Nuclei in the central nervous system are 3D aggregates of neurons that have common physiological properties, functionalities, and connectivities. To form specific nuclei, neurons migrate from their birthplace towards the presumptive nuclear region where they change their dynamics to aggregate and rearrange into a distinct 3D structure, a process that we term nucleogenesis. Nuclei, together with the laminar structure, form the basic cytoarchitectonic unit for information processing. However, in contrast to much-studied laminar structures, the neuronal dynamics that contribute to the aggregation process to form nuclei are poorly understood. Here, we analyze nucleogenesis by observing the mouse precerebellar pontine nucleus (PN), and provide the first 4D view of nucleogenesis by tracking neuronal behaviors along the three spatial axes over time. Early- and late-born PN neurons were labeled by in utero electroporation and their behaviors on cultured brain slices were recorded by time-lapse imaging. We find that when PN neurons migrate medially into the nuclear region, many of them switch to migrate radially and laterally, to populate the dorsal and lateral PN regions, respectively. The tendency to switch to radial migration is much less in later-born neurons, whereas that to switch to lateral migration is comparable between the two groups. In contrast to the radial and mediolateral axes, very few PN neurons switch to migrate rostrocaudally. These results could thus provide a framework for understanding the mechanisms that regulate this complex yet important process.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - N01 AI-5001(United States)
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R56 DC010183(United States)

Increased radial glia quiescence, decreased reactivation upon injury and unaltered neuroblast behavior underlie decreased neurogenesis in the aging zebrafish telencephalon.

  • Edelmann K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2013 Sep 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The zebrafish has recently become a source of new data on the mechanisms of neural stem cell (NSC) maintenance and ongoing neurogenesis in adult brains. In this vertebrate, neurogenesis occurs at high levels in all ventricular regions of the brain, and brain injuries recover successfully, owing to the recruitment of radial glia, which function as NSCs. This new vertebrate model of adult neurogenesis is thus advancing our knowledge of the molecular cues in use for the activation of NSCs and fate of their progeny. Because the regenerative potential of somatic stem cells generally weakens with increasing age, it is important to assess the extent to which zebrafish NSC potential decreases or remains unaltered with age. We found that neurogenesis in the ventricular zone, in the olfactory bulb, and in a newly identified parenchymal zone of the telencephalon indeed declines as the fish ages and that oligodendrogenesis also declines. In the ventricular zone, the radial glial cell population remains largely unaltered morphologically but enters less frequently into the cell cycle and hence produces fewer neuroblasts. The neuroblasts themselves do not change their behavior with age and produce the same number of postmitotic neurons. Thus, decreased neurogenesis in the physiologically aging zebrafish brain is correlated with an increasing quiescence of radial glia. After injuries, radial glia in aged brains are reactivated, and the percentage of cell cycle entry is increased in the radial glia population. However, this reaction is far less pronounced than in younger animals, pointing to irreversible changes in aging zebrafish radial glia.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - 5P30HD024064(United States)

Biciliated ependymal cell proliferation contributes to spinal cord growth.

  • Alfaro-Cervello C
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Oct 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Two neurogenic regions have been described in the adult brain, the lateral ventricle subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus subgranular zone. It has been suggested that neural stem cells also line the central canal of the adult spinal cord. Using transmission and scanning electron microscopy and immunostaining, we describe here the organization and cell types of the central canal epithelium in adult mice. The identity of dividing cells was determined by 3D ultrastructural reconstructions of [(3) H]thymidine-labeled cells and confocal analysis of bromodeoxyuridine labeling. The most common cell type lining the central canal had two long motile (9+2) cilia and was vimentin+, CD24+, FoxJ1+, Sox2+, and CD133+, but nestin- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-. These biciliated ependymal cells of the central canal (Ecc) resembled E2 cells of the lateral ventricles, but their basal bodies were different from those of E2 or E1 cells. Interestingly, we frequently found Ecc cells with two nuclei and four cilia, suggesting they are formed by incomplete cytokinesis or cell fusion. GFAP+ astrocytes with a single cilium and an orthogonally oriented centriole were also observed. The majority of dividing cells corresponded to biciliated Ecc cells. Central canal proliferation was most common during the active period of spinal cord growth. Pairs of labeled Ecc cells were observed within the central canal in adult mice 2.5 weeks post labeling. Our work suggests that the vast majority of postnatal dividing cells in the central canal are Ecc cells and their proliferation is associated with the growth of the spinal cord.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - FRN15686(Canada)

The astrocytic lineage marker calmodulin-regulated spectrin-associated protein 1 (Camsap1): phenotypic heterogeneity of newly born Camsap1-expressing cells in injured mouse brain.

  • Yoshioka N
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Apr 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Calmodulin-regulated spectrin-associated protein 1 (Camsap1) has been recognized as a new marker for astrocytic lineage cells and is expressed on mature astrocytes in the adult brain (Yamamoto et al. [2009] J. Neurosci. Res. 87:503–513). In the present study, we found that newly born Camsap1-expressing cells exhibited regional heterogeneity in an early phase after stab injury of the mouse brain. In the surrounding area of the lesion site, Camsap1 was expressed on quiescent astrocytes. At 3 days after injury, Camsap1 immunoreactivity was upregulated on glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive (GFAP-ir) astrocytes. Some of these astrocytes incorporated bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) together with re-expression of the embryonic cytoskeleton protein nestin. In the neighboring region of the lesion cavity, Camsap1 was expressed on GFAP-negative cells. At 3 days after injury, GFAP-ir astrocytes were absent around the lesion cavity. At this stage, NG2-ir cells immunopositive for Camsap1 and immunonegative for GFAP were distributed in border of the lesion cavity. By 10 days, Camsap1 immunoreactivity was exclusively detected on GFAP-ir reactive astrocytes devoid of NG2 immunoreactivity. BrdU pulse-chase labeling assay suggested the differentiation of Camsap1+/NG2+ cells into Camsap1+/GFAP+ astrocytes. In the subependymal zone of the lateral ventricle, Camsap1-ir cells increased after injury. Camsap1 immunoreactivity was distributed on ependymal and subependymal cells bearing various astrocyte markers, and BrdU incorporation was enhanced on such Camsap1-ir cells after injury. These results suggest that newly born reactive astrocytes are derived from heterogeneous Camsap1-expressing cells in the injured brain.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK084352(United States)

Migration of neuronal precursors from the telencephalic ventricular zone into the olfactory bulb in adult zebrafish.

  • Kishimoto N
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2011 Dec 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the brain of adult mammals, neuronal precursors are generated in the subventricular zone in the lateral wall of the lateral ventricles and migrate into the olfactory bulbs (OBs) through a well-studied route called the rostral migratory stream (RMS). Recent studies have revealed that a comparable neural stem cell niche is widely conserved at the ventricular wall of adult vertebrates. However, little is known about the migration route of neuronal precursors in nonmammalian adult brains. Here, we show that, in the adult zebrafish, a cluster of neuronal precursors generated in the telencephalic ventricular zone migrates into the OB via a route equivalent to the mammalian RMS. Unlike the mammalian RMS, these neuronal precursors are not surrounded by glial tubes, although radial glial cells with a single cilium lined the telencephalic ventricular wall, much as in embryonic and neonatal mammals. To observe the migrating neuronal precursors in living brain tissue, we established a brain hemisphere culture using a zebrafish line carrying a GFP transgene driven by the neurogenin1 (ngn1) promoter. In these fish, GFP was observed in the neuronal precursors migrating in the RMS, some of which were aligned with blood vessels. Numerous ngn1:gfp-positive cells were observed migrating tangentially in the RMS-like route medial to the OB. Taken together, our results suggest that the RMS in the adult zebrafish telencephalon is a functional migratory pathway. This is the first evidence for the tangential migration of neuronal precursors in a nonmammalian adult telencephalon.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - (United States)

Expression of hairy/enhancer of split genes in neural progenitors and neurogenesis domains of the adult zebrafish brain.

  • Chapouton P
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2011 Jun 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

All subdivisions of the adult zebrafish brain maintain niches of constitutive neurogenesis, sustained by quiescent and multipotent progenitor populations. In the telencephalon, the latter potential neural stem cells take the shape of radial glia aligned along the ventricle and are controlled by Notch signalling. With the aim of identifying new markers of this cell type and of comparing the effectors of embryonic and adult neurogenesis, we focused on the family of hairy/enhancer of split [E(spl)] genes. We report the expression of seven hairy/E(spl) (her) genes and the new helt gene in three neurogenic areas of the adult zebrafish brain (telencephalon, hypothalamus, and midbrain) in relation to radial glia, proliferation, and neurogenesis. We show that the expression of most her genes in the adult brain characterizes quiescent radial glia, whereas only few are expressed in progenitor domains engaged in active proliferation or neurogenesis. The low proliferation status of most her-positive progenitors contrasts with the embryonic nervous system, in which her genes are expressed in actively dividing progenitors. Likewise, we demonstrate largely overlapping expression domains of a set of her genes in the adult brain, which is in striking contrast to their distinct embryonic expression profiles. Overall, our data provide a consolidated map of her expression, quiescent glia, proliferation, and neurogenesis in these various subdivisions of the adult brain and suggest distinct regulation and function of Her factors in the embryonic and adult contexts.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - R01HG005220(United States)

Cellular composition and organization of the subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream in the adult and neonatal common marmoset brain.

  • Sawamoto K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2011 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle contains neural stem cells. In rodents, these cells generate neuroblasts that migrate as chains toward the olfactory bulb along the rostral migratory stream (RMS). The neural-stem-cell niche at the ventricular wall is conserved in various animal species, including primates. However, it is unclear how the SVZ and RMS organization in nonhuman primates relates to that of rodents and humans. Here we studied the SVZ and RMS of the adult and neonatal common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a New World primate used widely in neuroscience, by electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical detection of cell-type-specific markers. The marmoset SVZ contained cells similar to type B, C, and A cells of the rodent SVZ in their marker expression and morphology. The adult marmoset SVZ had a three-layer organization, as in the human brain, with ependymal, hypocellular, and astrocyte-ribbon layers. However, the hypocellular layer was very thin or absent in the adult-anterior and neonatal SVZ. Anti-PSA-NCAM staining of the anterior SVZ in whole-mount ventricular wall preparations of adult marmosets revealed an extensive network of elongated cell aggregates similar to the neuroblast chains in rodents. Time-lapse recordings of marmoset SVZ explants cultured in Matrigel showed the neuroblasts migrating in chains, like rodent type A cells. These results suggest that some features of neurogenesis and neuronal migration in the SVZ are common to marmosets, humans, and rodents. This basic description of the adult and neonatal marmoset SVZ will be useful for future studies on adult neurogenesis in primates.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - 1R21AI085376(United States)

Conditional gene expression and lineage tracing of tuba1a expressing cells during zebrafish development and retina regeneration.

  • Ramachandran R
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Oct 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The tuba1a gene encodes a neural-specific α-tubulin isoform whose expression is restricted to the developing and regenerating nervous system. By using zebrafish as a model system for studying CNS regeneration, we recently showed that retinal injury induces tuba1a gene expression in Müller glia that reentered the cell cycle. However, because of the transient nature of tuba1a gene expression during development and regeneration, it was not possible to trace the lineage of the tuba1a-expressing cells with a reporter directly under the control of the tuba1a promoter. To overcome this limitation, we generated tuba1a:CreER(T2) and β-actin2:loxP-mCherrry-loxP-GFP double transgenic fish that allowed us to label tuba1a-expressing cells conditionally and permanently via ligand-induced recombination. During development, recombination revealed transient tuba1a expression in not only neural progenitors but also cells that contribute to skeletal muscle, heart, and intestine. In the adult, recombination revealed tuba1a expression in brain, olfactory neurons, and sensory cells of the lateral line, but not in the retina. After retinal injury, recombination showed tuba1a expression in Müller glia that had reentered the cell cycle, and lineage tracing indicated that these cells are responsible for regenerating retinal neurons and glia. These results suggest that tuba1a-expressing progenitors contribute to multiple cell lineages during development and that tuba1a-expressing Müller glia are retinal progenitors in the adult.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM077138(United States)

Axonal projections originating from raphe serotonergic neurons in the developing and adult zebrafish, Danio rerio, using transgenics to visualize raphe-specific pet1 expression.

  • Lillesaar C
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2009 Jan 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Serotonin is a major central nervous modulator of physiology and behavior and plays fundamental roles during development and plasticity of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS). Understanding the developmental control and functions of serotonergic neurons is therefore an important task. In all vertebrates, prominent serotonergic neurons are found in the superior and inferior raphe nuclei in the hindbrain innervating most CNS regions. In addition, all vertebrates except for mammals harbor other serotonergic centers, including several populations in the diencephalon. This, in combination with the intricate and wide distribution of serotonergic fibers, makes it difficult to sort out serotonergic innervation originating from the raphe from that of other serotonergic cell populations. To resolve this issue, we isolated the regulatory elements of the zebrafish raphe-specific gene pet1 and used them to drive expression of an eGFP transgene in the raphe population of serotonergic neurons. With this approach together with retrograde tracing we 1) describe in detail the development, anatomical organization, and projection pattern of zebrafish pet1-positive neurons compared with their mammalian counterparts, 2) identify a new serotonergic population in the ventrolateral zebrafish hindbrain, and 3) reveal some extent of functional subdivisions within the zebrafish superior raphe complex. Together, our results reveal for the first time the specific innervation pattern of the zebrafish raphe and, thus, provide a new model and various tools to investigate further the role of raphe serotonergic neurons in vertebrates.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS015547-28(United States)

Fgf signaling in the zebrafish adult brain: association of Fgf activity with ventricular zones but not cell proliferation.

  • Topp S
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The zebrafish adult brain contains numerous neural progenitors and is a good model to approach the general mechanisms of adult neural stem cell maintenance and neurogenesis. Here we use this model to test for a correlation between Fgf signaling and cell proliferation in adult progenitor zones. We report expression of Fgf signals (fgf3,4,8a,8b,17b), receptors (fgfr1-4), and targets (erm, pea3, dusp6, spry1,2,4, and P-ERK) and document that genes of the embryonic fgf8 synexpression group acquire strikingly divergent patterns in the adult brain. We further document the specific expression of fgf3, fgfr1-3, dusp6, and P-ERK in ventricular zones, which contain neural progenitors. In these locations, however, a comparison at the single-cell level of fgfr/P-ERK expression with bromo-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and the proliferation marker MCM5 indicates that Fgf signaling is not specifically associated with proliferating progenitors. Rather, it correlates with the ventricular radial glia state, some of which only are progenitors. Together these results stress the importance of Fgf signaling in the adult brain and establish the basis to study its function in zebrafish, in particular in relation to adult neurogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - EY 02686(United States)

Distinct molecular pathways for development of telencephalic interneuron subtypes revealed through analysis of Lhx6 mutants.

  • Zhao Y
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Sep 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Here we analyze the role of the Lhx6 lim-homeobox transcription factor in regulating the development of subsets of neocortical, hippocampal, and striatal interneurons. An Lhx6 loss-of-function allele, which expresses placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), allowed analysis of the development and fate of Lhx6-expressing interneurons in mice lacking this homeobox transcription factor. There are Lhx6+;Dlx+ and Lhx6-;Dlx+ subtypes of tangentially migrating interneurons. Most interneurons in Lhx6(PLAP/PLAP) mutants migrate to the cortex, although less efficiently, and exhibit defects in populating the marginal zone and superficial parts of the neocortical plate. By contrast, migration to superficial parts of the hippocampus is not seriously affected. Furthermore, whereas parvalbumin+ and somatostatin+ interneurons do not differentiate, NPY+ interneurons are present; we suggest that these NPY+ interneurons are derived from the Lhx6-;Dlx+ subtype. Striatal interneurons show deficits distinct from pallial interneurons, including a reduction in the NPY+ subtype. We provide evidence that Lhx6 mediates these effects through promoting expression of receptors that regulate interneuron migration (ErbB4, CXCR4, and CXCR7), and through promoting the expression of transcription factors either known (Arx) or implicated (bMaf, Cux2, and NPAS1) in controlling interneuron development.

Nestin expression defines both glial and neuronal progenitors in postnatal sympathetic ganglia.

  • Shi H
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Jun 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Sympathetic ganglia are primarily composed of noradrenergic neurons and satellite glial cells. Although both cell types originate from neural crest cells, the identities of the progenitor populations at intermediate stages of the differentiation process remain to be established. Here we report on the identification in vivo of glial and neuronal progenitor cells in postnatal sympathetic ganglia, by using mouse superior cervical ganglia as a model system. There are significant levels of cellular proliferation in mouse superior cervical ganglia during the first 18 days after birth. A majority of the proliferating cells express both nestin and brain lipid-binding protein (BLBP). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) fate-tracing experiments demonstrate that these nestin and BLBP double-positive cells represent a population of glial progenitors for sympathetic satellite cells. The glial differentiation process is characterized by a marked downregulation of nestin and upregulation of S100, with no significant changes in the levels of BLBP expression. We also identify a small number of proliferating cells that express nestin and tyrosine hydroxylase, a key enzyme of catecholamine biosynthesis that defines sympathetic noradrenergic neurons. Together, these results establish nestin as a common marker for sympathetic neuronal and glial progenitor cells and delineate the cellular basis for the generation and maturation of sympathetic satellite cells.

Identification of aromatase-positive radial glial cells as progenitor cells in the ventricular layer of the forebrain in zebrafish.

  • Pellegrini E
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2007 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Compared with other vertebrates, the brain of adult teleost fish exhibits two unique features: it exhibits unusually high neurogenic activity and strongly expresses aromatase, a key enzyme that converts aromatizable androgens into estrogens. Until now, these two features, high neurogenic and aromatase activities, have never been related to each other. Recently, it was shown that aromatase is expressed in radial glial cells of the forebrain and not in neurons. Here, we further document that Aromatase B is never detected in cells expressing the markers of postmitotic neurons, Hu and acetylated tubulin. By using a combination of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) treatment and immunohistochemical techniques, we demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that aromatase-positive radial cells actively divide to generate newborn cells in many forebrain regions. Such newborn cells can further divide, as shown by BrdU-proliferating cell nuclear antigen double staining. We also demonstrate that, over time, newborn cells move away from the ventricles, most likely by migrating along the radial processes. Finally, by using antisera to Hu and acetylated tubulin, we further document that some of the newborn cells derived from radial glia differentiate into neurons. These data provide new evidence for the mechanism of neurogenesis in the brain of adult fish. In addition, given that estrogens are well-known neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors affecting proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and differentiation, the expression of aromatase in the neural stem cells of the adult strongly demonstrates that the fish brain is an outstanding model for studying the effects of estrogens on adult neurogenesis and brain repair.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - T32 EY013934(United States)
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR061569(United States)