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Cy3-AffiniPure Donkey Anti-Mouse IgG (H+L) (min X Bov,Ck,Gt,GP,Sy Hms,Hrs,Hu,Rb,Shp Sr Prot) antibody

RRID:AB_2340813

Class 4 Semaphorins and Plexin-B receptors regulate GABAergic and glutamatergic synapse development in the mammalian hippocampus.

  • McDermott JE
  • Mol. Cell. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jul 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

To understand how proper circuit formation and function is established in the mammalian brain, it is necessary to define the genes and signaling pathways that instruct excitatory and inhibitory synapse development. We previously demonstrated that the ligand-receptor pair, Sema4D and Plexin-B1, regulates inhibitory synapse development on an unprecedentedly fast time-scale while having no effect on excitatory synapse development. Here, we report previously undescribed synaptogenic roles for Sema4A and Plexin-B2 and provide new insight into Sema4D and Plexin-B1 regulation of synapse development in rodent hippocampus. First, we show that Sema4a, Sema4d, Plxnb1, and Plxnb2 have distinct and overlapping expression patterns in neurons and glia in the developing hippocampus. Second, we describe a requirement for Plexin-B1 in both the presynaptic axon of inhibitory interneurons as well as the postsynaptic dendrites of excitatory neurons for Sema4D-dependent inhibitory synapse development. Third, we define a new synaptogenic activity for Sema4A in mediating inhibitory and excitatory synapse development. Specifically, we demonstrate that Sema4A signals through the same pathway as Sema4D, via the postsynaptic Plexin-B1 receptor, to promote inhibitory synapse development. However, Sema4A also signals through the Plexin-B2 receptor to promote excitatory synapse development. Our results shed new light on the molecular cues that promote the development of either inhibitory or excitatory synapses in the mammalian hippocampus.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - T32 HG000046(United States)

VIP-immunoreactive interneurons within circuits of the mouse basolateral amygdala.

  • Rhomberg T
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jun 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

In cortical structures, principal cell activity is tightly regulated by different GABAergic interneurons (INs). In particular, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-expressing (VIP+) INs innervate preferentially other INs, providing a structural basis for temporal disinhibition of principal cells. However, relatively little is known about VIP+ INs in the amygdaloid basolateral complex (BLA). In this study, we report that VIP+ INs have a variable density in the distinct subdivisions of the mouse BLA. Based on different anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological criteria, VIP+ INs could be identified as interneuron-selective INs and basket cells expressing CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Whole-cell recordings of VIP+ interneuron-selective INs revealed 3 different spiking patterns, which did not associate with the expression of calretinin. Genetic targeting combined with optogenetics and in vitro recordings allowed us to identify several types of BLA INs innervated by VIP+ INs, including other interneuron-selective INs, basket and neurogliaform cells. Moreover, light stimulation of VIP+ basket cell axon terminals, characterized by CB1 sensitivity, evoked IPSPs in ∼20% of principal neurons. Finally, we show that VIP+ INs receive a dense innervation from both GABAergic, although only 10% from other VIP+ INs, and distinct glutamatergic inputs, identified by their expression of different vesicular glutamate transporters.In conclusion, our study provides a wide-range analysis of single-cell properties of VIP+ INs in the mouse BLA and of their intrinsic and extrinsic connectivity. Our results reinforce the knowledge that VIP+ INs are structurally and functionally heterogeneous and that this heterogeneity could mediate different roles in amygdala-dependent functions.Significance statement:We provide the first comprehensive analysis of the distribution of VIP+ interneurons across the entire mouse BLA, as well as of their morphological and physiological properties. VIP+ interneurons in the neocortex preferentially target other interneurons to form a disinhibitory network that facilitates principal cell firing. Our study is the first to demonstrate the presence of such a disinhibitory circuitry in the BLA. We observed structural and functional heterogeneity of these INs and characterized their input/output connectivity. We also identified several types of BLA interneurons postsynaptic to VIP+ INs, whose inhibition may provide a temporal window for principal cell firing and facilitate associative plasticity, e.g. in fear learning. Disinhibition, thus, is emerging as a general mechanism, not limited to the neocortex.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - GM055962(United States)

Evolution of Cortical Neurogenesis in Amniotes Controlled by Robo Signaling Levels.

  • Cárdenas A
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jun 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cerebral cortex size differs dramatically between reptiles, birds, and mammals, owing to developmental differences in neuron production. In mammals, signaling pathways regulating neurogenesis have been identified, but genetic differences behind their evolution across amniotes remain unknown. We show that direct neurogenesis from radial glia cells, with limited neuron production, dominates the avian, reptilian, and mammalian paleocortex, whereas in the evolutionarily recent mammalian neocortex, most neurogenesis is indirect via basal progenitors. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments in mouse, chick, and snake embryos and in human cerebral organoids demonstrate that high Slit/Robo and low Dll1 signaling, via Jag1 and Jag2, are necessary and sufficient to drive direct neurogenesis. Attenuating Robo signaling and enhancing Dll1 in snakes and birds recapitulates the formation of basal progenitors and promotes indirect neurogenesis. Our study identifies modulation in activity levels of conserved signaling pathways as a primary mechanism driving the expansion and increased complexity of the mammalian neocortex during amniote evolution.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - (United Kingdom)

Regulation of Epithelial Plasticity Determines Metastatic Organotropism in Pancreatic Cancer.

  • Reichert M
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Jun 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

The regulation of metastatic organotropism in pancreatic ductal a denocarcinoma (PDAC) remains poorly understood. We demonstrate, using multiple mouse models, that liver and lung metastatic organotropism is dependent upon p120catenin (p120ctn)-mediated epithelial identity. Mono-allelic p120ctn loss accelerates KrasG12D-driven pancreatic cancer formation and liver metastasis. Importantly, one p120ctn allele is sufficient for E-CADHERIN-mediated cell adhesion. By contrast, cells with bi-allelic p120ctn loss demonstrate marked lung organotropism; however, rescue with p120ctn isoform 1A restores liver metastasis. In a p120ctn-independent PDAC model, mosaic loss of E-CADHERIN expression reveals selective pressure for E-CADHERIN-positive liver metastasis and E-CADHERIN-negative lung metastasis. Furthermore, human PDAC and liver metastases support the premise that liver metastases exhibit predominantly epithelial characteristics. RNA-seq demonstrates differential induction of pathways associated with metastasis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in p120ctn-deficient versus p120ctn-wild-type cells. Taken together, P120CTN and E-CADHERIN mediated epithelial plasticity is an addition to the conceptual framework underlying metastatic organotropism in pancreatic cancer.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - F30 CA180601()
  • NCI NIH HHS - F32 CA221094()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK050306()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK060694()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R21DK090778(United States)

The homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is a direct target of SoxC proteins during developmental vertebrate neurogenesis.

  • Jacob A
  • J. Neurochem.
  • 2018 May 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

The high-mobility-group-domain containing SoxC transcription factors Sox4 and Sox11 are expressed and required in the vertebrate central nervous system in neuronal precursors and neuroblasts. To identify genes that are widely regulated by SoxC proteins during vertebrate neurogenesis we generated expression profiles from developing mouse brain and chicken neural tube with reduced SoxC expression and found the transcription factor Prox1 strongly downregulated under both conditions. This led us to hypothesize that Prox1 expression depends on SoxC proteins in the developing central nervous system of mouse and chicken. By combining luciferase reporter assays and overexpression in the chicken neural tube with in vivo and in vitro binding studies, we identify the Prox1 gene promoter and two upstream enhancers at -44 kb and -40 kb relative to the transcription start as regulatory regions that are bound and activated by SoxC proteins. This argues that Prox1 is a direct target gene of SoxC proteins during neurogenesis. Electroporations in the chicken neural tube furthermore show that Prox1 activates a subset of SoxC target genes, whereas it has no effects on others. We propose that the transcriptional control of Prox1 by SoxC proteins may ensure coupling of two types of transcription factors that are both required during early neurogenesis, but have at least in part distinct functions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10 RR024615(United States)

Differential inputs to striatal cholinergic and parvalbumin interneurons imply functional distinctions.

  • Klug JR
  • Elife
  • 2018 May 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Striatal cholinergic (ChAT) and parvalbumin (PV) interneurons exert powerful influences on striatal function in health and disease, yet little is known about the organization of their inputs. Here using rabies tracing, electrophysiology and genetic tools, we compare the whole-brain inputs to these two types of striatal interneurons and dissect their functional connectivity in mice. ChAT interneurons receive a substantial cortical input from associative regions of cortex, such as the orbitofrontal cortex. Amongst subcortical inputs, a previously unknown inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus input to striatal PV interneurons is identified. Additionally, the external segment of the globus pallidus targets striatal ChAT interneurons, which is sufficient to inhibit tonic ChAT interneuron firing. Finally, we describe a novel excitatory pathway from the pedunculopontine nucleus that innervates ChAT interneurons. These results establish the brain-wide direct inputs of two major types of striatal interneurons and allude to distinct roles in regulating striatal activity and controlling behavior.

Funding information:
  • National Institutes of Health - R01AG047669()
  • National Institutes of Health - R01NS083815()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL073085-08(United States)

Synaptotagmin 4 Regulates Pancreatic β Cell Maturation by Modulating the Ca2+ Sensitivity of Insulin Secretion Vesicles.

  • Huang C
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 May 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

Islet β cells from newborn mammals exhibit high basal insulin secretion and poor glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Here we show that β cells of newborns secrete more insulin than adults in response to similar intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, suggesting differences in the Ca2+ sensitivity of insulin secretion. Synaptotagmin 4 (Syt4), a non-Ca2+ binding paralog of the β cell Ca2+ sensor Syt7, increased by ∼8-fold during β cell maturation. Syt4 ablation increased basal insulin secretion and compromised GSIS. Precocious Syt4 expression repressed basal insulin secretion but also impaired islet morphogenesis and GSIS. Syt4 was localized on insulin granules and Syt4 levels inversely related to the number of readily releasable vesicles. Thus, transcriptional regulation of Syt4 affects insulin secretion; Syt4 expression is regulated in part by Myt transcription factors, which repress Syt4 transcription. Finally, human SYT4 regulated GSIS in EndoC-βH1 cells, a human β cell line. These findings reveal the role that altered Ca2+ sensing plays in regulating β cell maturation.

Funding information:
  • Cancer Research UK - 12183(United Kingdom)
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK050203()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK090570()

Primary Traumatic Axonopathy in Mice Subjected to Impact Acceleration: A Reappraisal of Pathology and Mechanisms with High-Resolution Anatomical Methods.

  • Ziogas NK
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Apr 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is a common neuropathology in traumatic brain injury and is featured by primary injury to axons. Here, we generated TAI with impact acceleration of the head in male Thy1-eYFP-H transgenic mice in which specific populations of neurons and their axons are labeled with yellow fluorescent protein. This model results in axonal lesions in multiple axonal tracts along with blood-brain barrier disruption and neuroinflammation. The corticospinal tract, a prototypical long tract, is severely affected and is the focus of this study. Using optimized CLARITY at single-axon resolution, we visualized the entire corticospinal tract volume from the pons to the cervical spinal cord in 3D and counted the total number of axonal lesions and their progression over time. Our results divulged the presence of progressive traumatic axonopathy that was maximal at the pyramidal decussation. The perikarya of injured corticospinal neurons atrophied, but there was no evidence of neuronal cell death. We also used CLARITY at single-axon resolution to explore the role of the NMNAT2-SARM1 axonal self-destruction pathway in traumatic axonopathy. When we interfered with this pathway by genetically ablating SARM1 or by pharmacological strategies designed to increase levels of Nicotinamide (Nam), a feedback inhibitor of SARM1, we found a significant reduction in the number of axonal lesions early after injury. Our findings show that high-resolution neuroanatomical strategies reveal important features of TAI with biological implications, especially the progressive axonopathic nature of TAI and the role of the NMNAT2-SARM1 pathway in the early stages of axonopathy.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the first systematic application of novel high-resolution neuroanatomical tools in neuropathology, we combined CLARITY with 2-photon microscopy, optimized for detection of single axonal lesions, to reconstruct the injured mouse brainstem in a model of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) that is a common pathology associated with traumatic brain injury. The 3D reconstruction of the corticospinal tract at single-axon resolution allowed for a more advanced level of qualitative and quantitative understanding of TAI. Using this model, we showed that TAI is an axonopathy with a prominent role of the NMNAT2-SARM1 molecular pathway, that is also implicated in peripheral neuropathy. Our results indicate that high-resolution anatomical models of TAI afford a level of detail and sensitivity that is ideal for testing novel molecular and biomechanical hypotheses.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK083402(United States)

Fear extinction requires infralimbic cortex projections to the basolateral amygdala.

  • Bloodgood DW
  • Transl Psychiatry
  • 2018 Mar 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Fear extinction involves the formation of a new memory trace that attenuates fear responses to a conditioned aversive memory, and extinction impairments are implicated in trauma- and stress-related disorders. Previous studies in rodents have found that the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL) and its glutamatergic projections to the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and basomedial amygdala (BMA) instruct the formation of fear extinction memories. However, it is unclear whether these pathways are exclusively involved in extinction, or whether other major targets of the IL, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc) also play a role. To address this outstanding issue, the current study employed a combination of electrophysiological and chemogenetic approaches in mice to interrogate the role of IL-BLA and IL-NAc pathways in extinction. Specifically, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology coupled with retrograde tracing to examine changes in neuronal activity of the IL and prelimbic cortex (PL) projections to both the BLA and NAc following fear extinction. We found that extinction produced a significant increase in the intrinsic excitability of IL-BLA projection neurons, while extinction appeared to reverse fear-induced changes in IL-NAc projection neurons. To establish a causal counterpart to these observations, we then used a pathway-specific Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADD) strategy to selectively inhibit PFC-BLA projection neurons during extinction acquisition. Using this approach, we found that DREADD-mediated inhibition of PFC-BLA neurons during extinction acquisition impaired subsequent extinction retrieval. Taken together, our findings provide further evidence for a critical contribution of the IL-BLA neural circuit to fear extinction.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - 5R01CA101870(United States)

The WAVE Regulatory Complex and Branched F-Actin Counterbalance Contractile Force to Control Cell Shape and Packing in the Drosophila Eye.

  • Del Signore SJ
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Contractile forces eliminate cell contacts in many morphogenetic processes. However, mechanisms that balance contractile forces to promote subtler remodeling remain unknown. To address this gap, we investigated remodeling of Drosophila eye lattice cells (LCs), which preserve cell contacts as they narrow to form the edges of a multicellular hexagonal lattice. We found that during narrowing, LC-LC contacts dynamically constrict and expand. Similar to other systems, actomyosin-based contractile forces promote pulses of constriction. Conversely, we found that WAVE-dependent branched F-actin accumulates at LC-LC contacts during expansion and functions to expand the cell apical area, promote shape changes, and prevent elimination of LC-LC contacts. Finally, we found that small Rho GTPases regulate the balance of contractile and protrusive dynamics. These data suggest a mechanism by which WAVE regulatory complex-based F-actin dynamics antagonize contractile forces to regulate cell shape and tissue topology during remodeling and thus contribute to the robustness and precision of the process.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI058279-05(United States)

Homeostatic Changes in GABA and Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptors on GABAergic Neurons in the Mesencephalic Reticular Formation following Sleep Deprivation.

  • Toossi H
  • eNeuro
  • 2018 Jan 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

We have examined whether GABAergic neurons in the mesencephalic reticular formation (RFMes), which are believed to inhibit the neurons in the pons that generate paradoxical sleep (PS or REMS), are submitted to homeostatic regulation under conditions of sleep deprivation (SD) by enforced waking during the day in mice. Using immunofluorescence, we investigated first, by staining for c-Fos, whether GABAergic RFMes neurons are active during SD and then, by staining for receptors, whether their activity is associated with homeostatic changes in GABAA or acetylcholine muscarinic type 2 (AChM2) receptors (Rs), which evoke inhibition. We found that a significantly greater proportion of the GABAergic neurons were positively stained for c-Fos after SD (∼27%) as compared to sleep control (SC; ∼1%) and sleep recovery (SR; ∼6%), suggesting that they were more active during waking with SD and less active or inactive during sleep with SC and SR. The density of GABAARs and AChM2Rs on the plasma membrane of the GABAergic neurons was significantly increased after SD and restored to control levels after SR. We conclude that the density of these receptors is increased on RFMes GABAergic neurons during presumed enhanced activity with SD and is restored to control levels during presumed lesser or inactivity with SR. Such increases in GABAAR and AChM2R with sleep deficits would be associated with increased susceptibility of the wake-active GABAergic neurons to inhibition from GABAergic and cholinergic sleep-active neurons and to thus permitting the onset of sleep and PS with muscle atonia.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - 5P01CA013106-38(United States)

The Lamprey Pallium Provides a Blueprint of the Mammalian Layered Cortex.

  • Suryanarayana SM
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 Nov 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

The basic architecture of the mammalian neocortex is remarkably similar across species. Pallial structures in the reptilian brain are considered amniote precursors of mammalian neocortex, whereas pallia of anamniotes ("lower" vertebrates) have been deemed largely insignificant with respect to homology. Here, we examine the cytoarchitecture of the lateral pallium in the lamprey, the phylogenetically oldest group of extant vertebrates. We reveal a three-layered structure with similar excitatory cell types as in the mammalian cortex and GABAergic interneurons. The ventral parts are sensory areas receiving monosynaptic thalamic input that can be activated from the optic nerve, whereas the dorsal parts contain motor areas with efferent projections to the brainstem, receiving oligosynaptic thalamic input. Both regions receive monosynaptic olfactory input. This three-layered "primordial" lamprey lateral pallium has evolved most features of the three-layered reptilian cortices and is thereby a precursor of the six-layered "neo" cortex with a long-standing evolutionary precedent (some 500 million years ago).

GABA Receptors on Orexin and Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons Are Differentially Homeostatically Regulated Following Sleep Deprivation.

  • Toossi H
  • eNeuro
  • 2017 Oct 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Though overlapping in distribution through the hypothalamus, orexin (Orx) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons play opposite roles in the regulation of sleep-wake states. Orx neurons discharge during waking, whereas MCH neurons discharge during sleep. In the present study, we examined in mice whether GABAA and GABAB receptors (Rs) are present on Orx and MCH neurons and might undergo differential changes as a function of their different activities following sleep deprivation (SD) and sleep recovery (SR). Applying quantitative stereological image analysis to dual-immunofluorescent stained sections, we determined that the proportion of Orx neurons positively immunostained for GABAARs was significantly higher following SD (∼48%) compared with sleep control (SC; ∼24%) and SR (∼27%), and that the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly greater. In contrast, the average proportion of the MCH neurons immunostained for GABAARs was insignificantly lower following SD (∼43%) compared with SC (∼54%) and SR (56%), and the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly less. Although, GABABRs were observed in all Orx and MCH neurons (100%), the luminance of these receptors was differentially altered following SD. The intensity of GABABRs in the Orx neurons was significantly greater after SD than after SC and SR, whereas that in the MCH neurons was significantly less. The present results indicate that GABA receptors undergo dynamic and differential changes in the wake-active Orx neurons and the sleep-active MCH neurons as a function of and homeostatic adjustment to their preceding activity and sleep-wake state.

Funding information:
  • Cancer Research UK - P30 CA021765(United Kingdom)

An insect-like mushroom body in a crustacean brain.

  • Wolff GH
  • Elife
  • 2017 Sep 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mushroom bodies are the iconic learning and memory centers of insects. No previously described crustacean possesses a mushroom body as defined by strict morphological criteria although crustacean centers called hemiellipsoid bodies, which serve functions in sensory integration, have been viewed as evolutionarily convergent with mushroom bodies. Here, using key identifiers to characterize neural arrangements, we demonstrate insect-like mushroom bodies in stomatopod crustaceans (mantis shrimps). More than any other crustacean taxon, mantis shrimps display sophisticated behaviors relating to predation, spatial memory, and visual recognition comparable to those of insects. However, neuroanatomy-based cladistics suggesting close phylogenetic proximity of insects and stomatopod crustaceans conflicts with genomic evidence showing hexapods closely related to simple crustaceans called remipedes. We discuss whether corresponding anatomical phenotypes described here reflect the cerebral morphology of a common ancestor of Pancrustacea or an extraordinary example of convergent evolution.

Heterophilic Type II Cadherins Are Required for High-Magnitude Synaptic Potentiation in the Hippocampus.

  • Basu R
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Sep 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hippocampal CA3 neurons form synapses with CA1 neurons in two layers, stratum oriens (SO) and stratum radiatum (SR). Each layer develops unique synaptic properties but molecular mechanisms that mediate these differences are unknown. Here, we show that SO synapses normally have significantly more mushroom spines and higher-magnitude long-term potentiation (LTP) than SR synapses. Further, we discovered that these differences require the Type II classic cadherins, cadherins-6, -9, and -10. Though cadherins typically function via trans-cellular homophilic interactions, our results suggest presynaptic cadherin-9 binds postsynaptic cadherins-6 and -10 to regulate mushroom spine density and high-magnitude LTP in the SO layer. Loss of these cadherins has no effect on the lower-magnitude LTP typically observed in the SR layer, demonstrating that cadherins-6, -9, and -10 are gatekeepers for high-magnitude LTP. Thus, Type II cadherins may uniquely contribute to the specificity and strength of synaptic changes associated with learning and memory.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY022073()

Early Integration of Temperature and Humidity Stimuli in the Drosophila Brain.

  • Frank DD
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 Aug 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

The Drosophila antenna contains receptor neurons for mechanical, olfactory, thermal, and humidity stimuli. Neurons expressing the ionotropic receptor IR40a have been implicated in the selection of an appropriate humidity range [1, 2], but although previous work indicates that insect hygroreceptors may be made up by a "triad" of neurons (with a dry-, a cold-, and a humid-air-responding cell [3]), IR40a expression included only cold- and dry-air cells. Here, we report the identification of the humid-responding neuron that completes the hygrosensory triad in the Drosophila antenna. This cell type expresses the Ir68a gene, and Ir68a mutation perturbs humidity preference. Next, we follow the projections of Ir68a neurons to the brain and show that they form a distinct glomerulus in the posterior antennal lobe (PAL). In the PAL, a simple sensory map represents related features of the external environment with adjacent "hot," "cold," "dry," and "humid" glomeruli-an organization that allows for both unique and combinatorial sampling by central relay neurons. Indeed, flies avoided dry heat more robustly than humid heat, and this modulation was abolished by silencing of dry-air receptors. Consistently, at least one projection neuron type received direct synaptic input from both temperature and dry-air glomeruli. Our results further our understanding of humidity sensing in the Drosophila antenna, uncover a neuronal substrate for early sensory integration of temperature and humidity in the brain, and illustrate the logic of how ethologically relevant combinations of sensory cues can be processed together to produce adaptive behavioral responses.

Direct Reprogramming of Fibroblasts via a Chemically Induced XEN-like State.

  • Li X
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Aug 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Direct lineage reprogramming, including with small molecules, has emerged as a promising approach for generating desired cell types. We recently found that during chemical induction of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts, cells pass through an extra-embryonic endoderm (XEN)-like state. Here, we show that these chemically induced XEN-like cells can also be induced to directly reprogram into functional neurons, bypassing the pluripotent state. The induced neurons possess neuron-specific expression profiles, form functional synapses in culture, and further mature after transplantation into the adult mouse brain. Using similar principles, we were also able to induce hepatocyte-like cells from the XEN-like cells. Cells in the induced XEN-like state were readily expandable over at least 20 passages and retained genome stability and lineage specification potential. Our study therefore establishes a multifunctional route for chemical lineage reprogramming and may provide a platform for generating a diverse range of cell types via application of this expandable XEN-like state.

Structural Insights into Modulation of Neurexin-Neuroligin Trans-synaptic Adhesion by MDGA1/Neuroligin-2 Complex.

  • Kim JA
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Jun 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Membrane-associated mucin domain-containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor proteins (MDGAs) bind directly to neuroligin-1 (NL1) and neuroligin-2 (NL2), thereby respectively regulating excitatory and inhibitory synapse development. However, the mechanisms by which MDGAs modulate NL activity to specify development of the two synapse types remain unclear. Here, we determined the crystal structures of human NL2/MDGA1 Ig1-3 complex, revealing their stable 2:2 arrangement with three interaction interfaces. Cell-based assays using structure-guided, site-directed MDGA1 mutants showed that all three contact patches were required for the MDGA's negative regulation of NL2-mediated synaptogenic activity. Furthermore, MDGA1 competed with neurexins for NL2 via its Ig1 domain. The binding affinities of both MDGA1 and MDGA2 for NL1 and NL2 were similar, consistent with the structural prediction of similar binding interfaces. However, MDGA1 selectively associated with NL2, but not NL1, in vivo. These findings collectively provide structural insights into the mechanism by which MDGAs negatively modulate synapse development governed by NLs/neurexins.

Mov10 suppresses retroelements and regulates neuronal development and function in the developing brain.

  • Skariah G
  • BMC Biol.
  • 2017 Jun 29

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Moloney leukemia virus 10 (Mov10) is an RNA helicase that mediates access of the RNA-induced silencing complex to messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Until now, its role as an RNA helicase and as a regulator of retrotransposons has been characterized exclusively in cell lines. We investigated the role of Mov10 in the mouse brain by examining its expression over development and attempting to create a Mov10 knockout mouse. Loss of both Mov10 copies led to early embryonic lethality. RESULTS: Mov10 was significantly elevated in postnatal murine brain, where it bound retroelement RNAs and mRNAs. Mov10 suppressed retroelements in the nucleus by directly inhibiting complementary DNA synthesis, while cytosolic Mov10 regulated cytoskeletal mRNAs to influence neurite outgrowth. We verified this important function by observing reduced dendritic arborization in hippocampal neurons from the Mov10 heterozygote mouse and shortened neurites in the Mov10 knockout Neuro2A cells. Knockdown of Fmrp also resulted in shortened neurites. Mov10, Fmrp, and Ago2 bound a common set of mRNAs in the brain. Reduced Mov10 in murine brain resulted in anxiety and increased activity in a novel environment, supporting its important role in the development of normal brain circuitry. CONCLUSIONS: Mov10 is essential for normal neuronal development and brain function. Mov10 preferentially binds RNAs involved in actin binding, neuronal projection, and cytoskeleton. This is a completely new and critically important function for Mov10 in neuronal development and establishes a precedent for Mov10 being an important candidate in neurological disorders that have underlying cytoarchitectural causes like autism and Alzheimer's disease.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL126845()

Downregulation of RBO-PI4KIIIα Facilitates Aβ42 Secretion and Ameliorates Neural Deficits in Aβ42-Expressing Drosophila.

  • Zhang X
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 May 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Phosphoinositides and their metabolizing enzymes are involved in Aβ42 metabolism and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. In yeast and mammals, Eighty-five requiring 3 (EFR3), whose Drosophila homolog is Rolling Blackout (RBO), forms a plasma membrane-localized protein complex with phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase Type IIIα (PI4KIIIα) and a scaffold protein to tightly control the level of plasmalemmal phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). Here, we report that RBO binds to Drosophila PI4KIIIα, and that in an Aβ42-expressing Drosophila model, separate genetic reduction of PI4KIIIα and RBO, or pharmacological inhibition of PI4KIIIα ameliorated synaptic transmission deficit, climbing ability decline, premature death, and reduced neuronal accumulation of Aβ42 Moreover, we found that RBO-PI4KIIIa downregulation increased neuronal Aβ42 release and that PI4P facilitated the assembly or oligomerization of Aβ42 in/on liposomes. These results indicate that RBO-PI4KIIIa downregulation facilitates neuronal Aβ42 release and consequently reduces neuronal Aβ42 accumulation likely via decreasing Aβ42 assembly in/on plasma membrane. This study suggests the RBO-PI4KIIIα complex as a potential therapeutic target and PI4KIIIα inhibitors as drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease treatment.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Phosphoinositides and their metabolizing enzymes are involved in Aβ42 metabolism and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Here, in an Aβ42-expressing Drosophila model, we discovered and studied the beneficial role of downregulating RBO or its interacting protein PI4KIIIα-a protein that tightly controls the plasmalemmal level of PI4P-against the defects caused by Aβ42 expression. Mechanistically, RBO-PI4KIIIα downregulation reduced neuronal Aβ42 accumulation, and interestingly increased neuronal Aβ42 release. This study suggests the RBO-PI4KIIIα complex as a novel therapeutic target, and PI4KIIIα inhibitors as new drug candidates.

Pancreatic Nonhormone Expressing Endocrine Cells in Children With Type 1 Diabetes.

  • Md Moin AS
  • J Endocr Soc
  • 2017 May 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

It has been proposed that the deficit in β-cell mass in type 1 diabetes (T1D) may be due, in part, to β-cell degranulation to chromogranin-positive hormone-negative (CPHN) cells. The frequency and distribution of pancreatic CPHN cells were investigated in 19 children with T1D compared with 14 non-diabetic (ND) children. We further evaluated these cells for replication and expression of endocrine lineage markers Nkx6.1 and Nkx2.2, and compared these frequencies with those previously reported in CPHN cells in adults with T1D. In contrast to adults' cells, pancreatic CPHN cells were comparably abundant (percentage of endocrine cells ± standard error of the mean, 1.4 ± 0.2 vs 1.0 ± 0.2 in patients with T1D vs ND subjects, respectively; P = not significant) and comparably distributed in children with T1D vs ND donors. Replication of CPHN cells was detected but unchanged in children with T1D vs ND children, as was the percentage of CPHN cells expressing Nkx6.1 or NKx2.2. In children with T1D, the frequency of pancreatic CPHN cells was not increased, and this differed from adults with T1D.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK077967()

Dynamic Palmitoylation Targets MAP6 to the Axon to Promote Microtubule Stabilization during Neuronal Polarization.

  • Tortosa E
  • Neuron
  • 2017 May 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are main candidates to stabilize neuronal microtubules, playing an important role in establishing axon-dendrite polarity. However, how MAPs are selectively targeted to specific neuronal compartments remains poorly understood. Here, we show specific localization of microtubule-associated protein 6 (MAP6)/stable tubule-only polypeptide (STOP) throughout neuronal maturation and its role in axonal development. In unpolarized neurons, MAP6 is present at the Golgi complex and in secretory vesicles. As neurons mature, MAP6 is translocated to the proximal axon, where it binds and stabilizes microtubules. Further, we demonstrate that dynamic palmitoylation, mediated by the family of α/β Hydrolase domain-containing protein 17 (ABHD17A-C) depalmitoylating enzymes, controls shuttling of MAP6 between membranes and microtubules and is required for MAP6 retention in axons. We propose a model in which MAP6's palmitoylation mediates microtubule stabilization, allows efficient organelle trafficking, and controls axon maturation in vitro and in situ.

The Sec61 translocon limits IRE1α signaling during the unfolded protein response.

  • Sundaram A
  • Elife
  • 2017 May 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

IRE1α is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localized endonuclease activated by misfolded proteins in the ER. Previously, we demonstrated that IRE1α forms a complex with the Sec61 translocon, to which its substrate XBP1u mRNA is recruited for cleavage during ER stress (Plumb et al., 2015). Here, we probe IRE1α complexes in cells with blue native PAGE immunoblotting. We find that IRE1α forms a hetero-oligomeric complex with the Sec61 translocon that is activated upon ER stress with little change in the complex. In addition, IRE1α oligomerization, activation, and inactivation during ER stress are regulated by Sec61. Loss of the IRE1α-Sec61 translocon interaction as well as severe ER stress conditions causes IRE1α to form higher-order oligomers that exhibit continuous activation and extended cleavage of XBP1u mRNA. Thus, we propose that the Sec61-IRE1α complex defines the extent of IRE1α activity and may determine cell fate decisions during ER stress conditions.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007223()

Homeostatic Changes in GABA and Glutamate Receptors on Excitatory Cortical Neurons during Sleep Deprivation and Recovery.

  • Del Cid-Pellitero E
  • Front Syst Neurosci
  • 2017 Apr 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neuronal activity is regulated in a homeostatic manner through changes in inhibitory GABA and excitatory glutamate (Glu) AMPA (A) receptors (GluARs). Using immunofluorescent staining, we examined whether calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα)-labeled (+) excitatory neurons in the barrel cortex undergo such homeostatic regulation following enforced waking with associated cortical activation during the day when mice normally sleep the majority of the time. Sleep deprived mice were prevented from falling asleep by unilateral whisker stimulation and sleep recovery (SR) mice allowed to sleep freely following deprivation. In parallel with changes in c-Fos reflecting changes in activity, (β2-3 subunits of) GABAA Rs were increased on the membrane of CaMKIIα+ neurons with enforced waking and returned to baseline levels with SR in barrel cortex on sides both contra- and ipsilateral to the whisker stimulation. The GABAAR increase was correlated with increased gamma electroencephalographic (EEG) activity across conditions. On the other hand, (GluA1 subunits of) AMPA Rs were progressively removed from the membrane of CaMKIIα+ neurons by (Rab5+) early endosomes during enforced waking and returned to the membrane by (Rab11+) recycling endosomes during SR. The internalization of the GluA1Rs paralleled the expression of Arc, which mediates homeostatic regulation of AMPA receptors through an endocytic pathway. The reciprocal changes in GluA1Rs relative to GABAARs suggest homeostatic down-scaling during enforced waking and sensory stimulation and restorative up-scaling during recovery sleep. Such homeostatic changes with sleep-wake states and their associated cortical activities could stabilize excitability and activity in excitatory cortical neurons.

Homeostatic regulation through GABA and acetylcholine muscarinic receptors of motor trigeminal neurons following sleep deprivation.

  • Toossi H
  • Brain Struct Funct
  • 2017 Mar 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

Muscle tone is regulated across sleep-wake states, being maximal in waking, reduced in slow wave sleep (SWS) and absent in paradoxical or REM sleep (PS or REMS). Such changes in tone have been recorded in the masseter muscles and shown to correspond to changes in activity and polarization of the trigeminal motor 5 (Mo5) neurons. The muscle hypotonia and atonia during sleep depend in part on GABA acting upon both GABAA and GABAB receptors (Rs) and acetylcholine (ACh) acting upon muscarinic 2 (AChM2) Rs. Here, we examined whether Mo5 neurons undergo homeostatic regulation through changes in these inhibitory receptors following prolonged activity with enforced waking. By immunofluorescence, we assessed that the proportion of Mo5 neurons positively stained for GABAARs was significantly higher after sleep deprivation (SD, ~65%) than sleep control (SC, ~32%) and that the luminance of the GABAAR fluorescence was significantly higher after SD than SC and sleep recovery (SR). Although, all Mo5 neurons were positively stained for GABABRs and AChM2Rs (100%) in all groups, the luminance of these receptors was significantly higher following SD as compared to SC and SR. We conclude that the density of GABAA, GABAB and AChM2 receptors increases on Mo5 neurons during SD. The increase in these receptors would be associated with increased inhibition in the presence of GABA and ACh and thus a homeostatic down-scaling in the excitability of the Mo5 neurons after prolonged waking and resulting increased susceptibility to muscle hypotonia or atonia along with sleep.

p27Kip1 promotes invadopodia turnover and invasion through the regulation of the PAK1/Cortactin pathway.

  • Jeannot P
  • Elife
  • 2017 Mar 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

p27Kip1 (p27) is a cyclin-CDK inhibitor and negative regulator of cell proliferation. p27 also controls other cellular processes including migration and cytoplasmic p27 can act as an oncogene. Furthermore, cytoplasmic p27 promotes invasion and metastasis, in part by promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Herein, we find that p27 promotes cell invasion by binding to and regulating the activity of Cortactin, a critical regulator of invadopodia formation. p27 localizes to invadopodia and limits their number and activity. p27 promotes the interaction of Cortactin with PAK1. In turn, PAK1 promotes invadopodia turnover by phosphorylating Cortactin, and expression of Cortactin mutants for PAK-targeted sites abolishes p27's effect on invadopodia dynamics. Thus, in absence of p27, cells exhibit increased invadopodia stability due to impaired PAK1-Cortactin interaction, but their invasive capacity is reduced compared to wild-type cells. Overall, we find that p27 directly promotes cell invasion by facilitating invadopodia turnover via the Rac1/PAK1/Cortactin pathway.

Tridimensional Visualization and Analysis of Early Human Development.

  • Belle M
  • Cell
  • 2017 Mar 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Generating a precise cellular and molecular cartography of the human embryo is essential to our understanding of the mechanisms of organogenesis in normal and pathological conditions. Here, we have combined whole-mount immunostaining, 3DISCO clearing, and light-sheet imaging to start building a 3D cellular map of the human development during the first trimester of gestation. We provide high-resolution 3D images of the developing peripheral nervous, muscular, vascular, cardiopulmonary, and urogenital systems. We found that the adult-like pattern of skin innervation is established before the end of the first trimester, showing important intra- and inter-individual variations in nerve branches. We also present evidence for a differential vascularization of the male and female genital tracts concomitant with sex determination. This work paves the way for a cellular and molecular reference atlas of human cells, which will be of paramount importance to understanding human development in health and disease. PAPERCLIP.

Glial activation in the periaqueductal gray promotes descending facilitation of neuropathic pain through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

  • Ni HD
  • J. Neurosci. Res.
  • 2016 Jan 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

The midbrain ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VL-PAG) is a key component that mediates pain modulation. Although spinal cord glial cells appear to play an important role in chronic pain development, the precise mechanisms involving descending facilitation pathways from the PAG following nerve injury are poorly understood. This study shows that cellular events that occur during glial activation in the VL-PAG may promote descending facilitation from the PAG during neuropathic pain. Chronic constriction nerve injury (CCI) was induced by ligature construction of the sciatic nerve in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Behavioral responses to noxious mechanical (paw withdrawal threshold; PWT) and thermal (paw withdrawal latency; PWL) stimuli were evaluated. After CCI, immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis of microglia and astrocytes in the VL-PAG showed morphological and quantitative changes indicative of activation in microglia and astrocytes. Intra-VL-PAG injection of microglial or astrocytic inhibitors attenuated PWT and PWL at days 7 and 14, respectively, following CCI. We also evaluated the effects of intra-VL-PAG administration of the phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) inhibitor SB 203580 at day 7 after CCI. This treatment abolished microglial activation and produced a significant time-dependent attenuation of PWT and PWL. Western blot analysis showed localized expression of p-p38 in the VL-PAG after CCI. P-p38 was expressed in labeled microglia of the VL-PAG but was not present in astrocytes and neurons on day 7 after CCI. These results demonstrate that CCI-induced neuropathic pain is associated with glial activation in the VL-PAG, which likely participates in descending pain facilitation through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA173903(United States)

Revisiting PC1/3 Mutants: Dominant-Negative Effect of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Retained Mutants.

  • Blanco EH
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Oct 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), encoded by the gene PCSK1, is critical for peptide hormone synthesis. An increasing number of studies have shown that inactivating mutations in PCSK1 are correlated with endocrine pathologies ranging from intestinal dysfunction to morbid obesity, whereas the common nonsynonymous polymorphisms rs6232 (N221D) and rs6234-rs6235 (Q665E-S690T) are highly associated with obesity risk. In this report, we revisited the biochemical and cellular properties of PC1/3 variants in the context of a wild-type PC1/3 background instead of the S357G hypermorph background used for all previous studies. In the wild-type background the PC1/3 N221D variant exhibited 30% lower enzymatic activity in a fluorogenic assay than wild-type PC1/3; this inhibition was greater than that detected in an equivalent experiment using the PC1/3 S357G background. A PC1/3 variant with the linked carboxyl-terminal polymorphisms Q665E-S690T did not show this difference. We also analyzed the biochemical properties of 2 PC1/3 mutants, G209R and G593R, which are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and studied their effects on wild-type PC1/3. The expression of ER-retained mutants induced ER stress markers and also resulted in dominant-negative blockade of wild-type PC1/3 prodomain cleavage and decreased expression of wild-type PC1/3, suggesting facilitation of the entry of wild-type protein to a degradative proteasomal pathway. Dominant-negative effects of PC1/3 mutations on the expression and maturation of wild-type protein, with consequential effects on PC1/3 availability, add a new element which must be considered in population and clinical studies of this gene.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - MH67121(United States)

Reprogramming Mouse Cells With a Pancreatic Duct Phenotype to Insulin-Producing β-Like Cells.

  • Yamada T
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Jun 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Reprogramming technology has opened the possibility of converting one cell type into another by forced expression of transgenes. Transduction of adenoviral vectors encoding 3 pancreatic transcription factors, Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA, into mouse pancreas results in direct reprogramming of exocrine cells to insulin-producing β-like cells. We hypothesized that cultured adult pancreatic duct cells could be reprogrammed to become insulin-producing β-cells by adenoviral-mediated expression of this same combination of factors. Exocrine were isolated from adult mouse insulin 1 promoter (MIP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice to allow new insulin-expressing cells to be detected by GFP fluorescence. Cultured cells were transduced by an adenoviral vector carrying a polycistronic construct Ngn3/Pdx1/MafA/mCherry (Ad-M3C) or mCherry sequence alone as a control vector. In addition, the effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, exendin-4 (Ex-4) on the reprogramming process were examined. GFP(+) cells appeared 2 days after Ad-M3C transduction; the reprogramming efficiency was 8.6 ± 2.6% by day 4 after transduction. Ad-M3C also resulted in increased expression of β-cell markers insulin 1 and 2, with enhancement by Ex-4. Expression of other β-cell markers, neuroD and GLP-1 receptor, were also significantly up-regulated. The amount of insulin release into the media and insulin content of the cells were significantly higher in the Ad-M3C-transduced cells; this too was enhanced by Ex-4. The transduced cells did not secrete insulin in response to increased glucose, indicating incomplete differentiation to β-cells. Thus, cultured murine adult pancreatic cells with a duct phenotype can be directly reprogrammed to insulin-producing β-like cells by adenoviral delivery of 3 pancreatic transcription factors.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - G1002033(United Kingdom)