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ubiquitin antibody

RRID:AB_2315524

Antibody ID

AB_2315524

Target Antigen

Proper Citation

(Agilent Cat# Z0458, RRID:AB_2315524)

Clonality

unknown

Comments

Original Manufacturer: Dako. Now part of Agilent.

Vendor

Agilent

Cat Num

Z0458

Dynamics of PARKIN-Dependent Mitochondrial Ubiquitylation in Induced Neurons and Model Systems Revealed by Digital Snapshot Proteomics.

  • Ordureau A
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Apr 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Flux through kinase and ubiquitin-driven signaling systems depends on the modification kinetics, stoichiometry, primary site specificity, and target abundance within the pathway, yet we rarely understand these parameters and their spatial organization within cells. Here we develop temporal digital snapshots of ubiquitin signaling on the mitochondrial outer membrane in embryonic stem cell-derived neurons, and we model HeLa cell systems upon activation of the PINK1 kinase and PARKIN ubiquitin ligase by proteomic counting of ubiquitylation and phosphorylation events. We define the kinetics and site specificity of PARKIN-dependent target ubiquitylation, and we demonstrate the power of this approach to quantify pathway modulators and to mechanistically define the role of PARKIN UBL phosphorylation in pathway activation in induced neurons. Finally, through modulation of pS65-Ub on mitochondria, we demonstrate that Ub hyper-phosphorylation is inhibitory to mitophagy receptor recruitment, indicating that pS65-Ub stoichiometry in vivo is optimized to coordinate PARKIN recruitment via pS65-Ub and mitophagy receptors via unphosphorylated chains.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - BB/I004815/1(United Kingdom)
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - K01 DK098285()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM067945()

Discovery and Characterization of ZUFSP/ZUP1, a Distinct Deubiquitinase Class Important for Genome Stability.

  • Kwasna D
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Apr 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are important regulators of ubiquitin signaling. Here, we report the discovery of deubiquitinating activity in ZUFSP/C6orf113. High-resolution crystal structures of ZUFSP in complex with ubiquitin reveal several distinctive features of ubiquitin recognition and catalysis. Our analyses reveal that ZUFSP is a novel DUB with no homology to any known DUBs, leading us to classify ZUFSP as the seventh DUB family. Intriguingly, the minimal catalytic domain does not cleave polyubiquitin. We identify two ubiquitin binding domains in ZUFSP: a ZHA (ZUFSP helical arm) that binds to the distal ubiquitin and an atypical UBZ domain in ZUFSP that binds to polyubiquitin. Importantly, both domains are essential for ZUFSP to selectively cleave K63-linked polyubiquitin. We show that ZUFSP localizes to DNA lesions, where it plays an important role in genome stability pathways, functioning to prevent spontaneous DNA damage and also promote cellular survival in response to exogenous DNA damage.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R21 AG040683(United States)

α-synuclein Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction through Spectrin and the Actin Cytoskeleton.

  • Ordonez DG
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Jan 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Genetics and neuropathology strongly link α-synuclein aggregation and neurotoxicity to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and related α-synucleinopathies. Here we describe a new Drosophila model of α-synucleinopathy based on widespread expression of wild-type human α-synuclein, which shows robust neurodegeneration, early-onset locomotor deficits, and abundant α-synuclein aggregation. We use results of forward genetic screening and genetic analysis in our new model to demonstrate that α-synuclein expression promotes reorganization of the actin filament network and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction through altered Drp1 localization. Similar changes are present in a mouse α-synucleinopathy model and in postmortem brain tissue from patients with α-synucleinopathy. Importantly, we provide evidence that the interaction of α-synuclein with spectrin initiates pathological alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and downstream neurotoxicity. These findings suggest new therapeutic approaches for α-synuclein induced neurodegeneration.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - U01 CA111275(United States)
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG044113()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - U54 HD090255()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM084947()
  • NIH HHS - P40 OD018537()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS083391()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS086074()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS092093()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS098821()

TIA1 Mutations in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia Promote Phase Separation and Alter Stress Granule Dynamics.

  • Mackenzie IR
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Aug 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are age-related neurodegenerative disorders with shared genetic etiologies and overlapping clinical and pathological features. Here we studied a novel ALS/FTD family and identified the P362L mutation in the low-complexity domain (LCD) of T cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1). Subsequent genetic association analyses showed an increased burden of TIA1 LCD mutations in ALS patients compared to controls (p = 8.7 × 10-6). Postmortem neuropathology of five TIA1 mutations carriers showed a consistent pathological signature with numerous round, hyaline, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive inclusions. TIA1 mutations significantly increased the propensity of TIA1 protein to undergo phase transition. In live cells, TIA1 mutations delayed stress granule (SG) disassembly and promoted the accumulation of non-dynamic SGs that harbored TDP-43. Moreover, TDP-43 in SGs became less mobile and insoluble. The identification of TIA1 mutations in ALS/FTD reinforces the importance of RNA metabolism and SG dynamics in ALS/FTD pathogenesis.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - R35 NS097974()

In Vivo Ubiquitin Linkage-type Analysis Reveals that the Cdc48-Rad23/Dsk2 Axis Contributes to K48-Linked Chain Specificity of the Proteasome.

  • Tsuchiya H
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 May 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) proteins regulate numerous cellular processes, but their specificities toward ubiquitin chain types in cells remain obscure. Here, we perform a quantitative proteomic analysis of ubiquitin linkage-type selectivity of 14 UBD proteins and the proteasome in yeast. We find that K48-linked chains are directed to proteasomal degradation through selectivity of the Cdc48 cofactor Npl4. Mutating Cdc48 results in decreased selectivity, and lacking Rad23/Dsk2 abolishes interactions between ubiquitylated substrates and the proteasome. Among them, only Npl4 has K48 chain specificity in vitro. Thus, the Cdc48 complex functions as a K48 linkage-specifying factor upstream of Rad23/Dsk2 for proteasomal degradation. On the other hand, K63 chains are utilized in endocytic pathways, whereas both K48 and K63 chains are found in the MVB and autophagic pathways. Collectively, our results provide an overall picture of the ubiquitin network via UBD proteins and identify the Cdc48-Rad23/Dsk2 axis as a major route to the proteasome.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS070300(United States)

Hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease in Stem-Cell-Derived Human Neurons Transplanted into Mouse Brain.

  • Espuny-Camacho I
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Mar 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) provide a unique entry to study species-specific aspects of human disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, in vitro culture of neurons deprives them of their natural environment. Here we transplanted human PSC-derived cortical neuronal precursors into the brain of a murine AD model. Human neurons differentiate and integrate into the brain, express 3R/4R Tau splice forms, show abnormal phosphorylation and conformational Tau changes, and undergo neurodegeneration. Remarkably, cell death was dissociated from tangle formation in this natural 3D model of AD. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we observed upregulation of genes involved in myelination and downregulation of genes related to memory and cognition, synaptic transmission, and neuron projection. This novel chimeric model for AD displays human-specific pathological features and allows the analysis of different genetic backgrounds and mutations during the course of the disease.

Tauopathy with paired helical filaments in an aged chimpanzee.

  • Rosen RF
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Jul 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

An enigmatic feature of age-related neurodegenerative diseases is that they seldom, if ever, are fully manifested in nonhuman species under natural conditions. The neurodegenerative tauopathies are typified by the intracellular aggregation of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and the dysfunction and death of affected neurons. We document the first case of tauopathy with paired helical filaments in an aged chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Pathologic forms of tau in neuronal somata, neuropil threads, and plaque-like clusters of neurites were histologically identified throughout the neocortex and, to a lesser degree, in allocortical and subcortical structures. Ultrastructurally, the neurofibrillary tangles consisted of tau-immunoreactive paired helical filaments with a diameter and helical periodicity indistinguishable from those seen in Alzheimer's disease. A moderate degree of Abeta deposition was present in the cerebral vasculature and, less frequently, in senile plaques. Sequencing of the exons and flanking intronic regions in the genomic MAPT locus disclosed no mutations that are associated with the known human hereditary tauopathies, nor any polymorphisms of obvious functional significance. Although the lesion profile in this chimpanzee differed somewhat from that in Alzheimer's disease, the copresence of paired helical filaments and Abeta-amyloidosis indicates that the molecular mechanisms for the pathogenesis of the two canonical Alzheimer lesions--neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques--are present in aged chimpanzees.