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Anti-NFkappaB, p65 subunit, active subunit, clone 12H11 antibody

RRID:AB_2178887

Antibody ID

AB_2178887

Target Antigen

Rela human, mouse, rat

Vendor

Boehringer

Cat Num

1697 838

Proper Citation

(Boehringer Cat# 1697 838, RRID:AB_2178887)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Host Organism

mouse

The Resource Identification Initiative: a cultural shift in publishing.

  • Bandrowski A
  • Brain Behav
  • 2018 Feb 13

Literature context: now commonly known as MAB3026 (RRID:AB_2178887) and provided its provenance: “


Abstract:

A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, that is, reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to identify the exact resources that are reported or to answer basic questions such as "How did other studies use resource X?" To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and scientific reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25 biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (i.e., software and databases). RRIDs are assigned by an authoritative database, for example, a model organism database for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal ( http://scicrunch.org/resources). RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40 with RRIDs appearing in 62 different journals to date. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are able to identify resources and are supportive of the goals of the project. Identifiability of the resources post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three resource types, suggesting that the project has had a significant impact on identifiability of research resources.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - EY026065(United States)

DNA strand breaks and TDP-43 mislocation are absent in the murine hSOD1G93A model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in vivo and in vitro.

  • Penndorf D
  • PLoS ONE
  • 2017 Aug 23

Literature context: 0; monoclonal; Merck Chemicals, RRID:AB_2178887). Primary antibodies were incub


Abstract:

Mutations in the human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase type-1 (hSOD1) gene are common in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). The pathophysiology has been linked to, e.g., organelle dysfunction, RNA metabolism and oxidative DNA damage conferred by SOD1 malfunction. However, apart from metabolically evoked DNA oxidation, it is unclear whether severe genotoxicity including DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs), originates from loss of function of nuclear SOD1 enzyme. Factors that endogenously interfere with DNA integrity and repair complexes in hSOD1-mediated fALS remain similarly unexplored. In this regard, uncontrolled activation of transposable elements (TEs) might contribute to DNA disintegration and neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the fALS-causing hSOD1G93A mutation in the generation of severe DNA damage beyond well-characterized DNA base oxidation. Therefore, DNA damage was assessed in spinal tissue of hSOD1G93A-overexpressing mice and in corresponding motor neuron-enriched cell cultures in vitro. Overexpression of the hSOD1G93A locus did not change the threshold for severe DNA damage per se. We found that levels of SSBs and DSBs were unaltered between hSOD1G93A and control conditions, as demonstrated in post-mitotic motor neurons and in astrocytes susceptible to replication-dependent DNA breakage. Analogously, parameters indicative of DNA damage response processes were not activated in vivo or in vitro. Evidence for a mutation-related elevation in TE activation was not detected, in accordance with the absence of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathy in terms of cytoplasmic mislocation or nuclear loss, as nuclear TDP-43 is supposed to silence TEs physiologically. Conclusively, the superoxide dismutase function of SOD1 might not be required to preserve DNA integrity in motor neurons, at least when the function of TDP-43 is unaltered. Our data establish a foundation for further investigations addressing functional TDP-43 interaction with ALS-relevant genetic mutations.

RRIDs: A Simple Step toward Improving Reproducibility through Rigor and Transparency of Experimental Methods.

  • Bandrowski AE
  • Neuron
  • 2016 May 4

Literature context: antibody (RRID:AB_2178887) tracked b


Abstract:

With the call for more rigorous scientific reporting, authentication, and transparency from the scientific community and funding agencies, one critical step is to make finding and identifying key resources in the published literature tractable. We discuss here the use of Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) as one tool to help resolve this tricky problem in reproducibility.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK103723(United States)

The Resource Identification Initiative: A cultural shift in publishing.

  • Bandrowski A
  • F1000Res
  • 2015 Dec 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to allow humans and algorithms to identify the exact resources that are reported or answer basic questions such as "What other studies used resource X?" To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25 biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (including software and databases). RRIDs represent accession numbers assigned by an authoritative database, e.g., the model organism databases, for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal ( www.scicrunch.org/resources). RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are generally accurate in performing the task of identifying resources and supportive of the goals of the project. We also show that identifiability of the resources pre- and post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three resource types, suggesting that the project has had a significant impact on reproducibility relating to research resources.

Funding information:
  • NIDA NIH HHS - HHSN271200577531C()
  • NIDA NIH HHS - U24 DA039832()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - U24 DK097771()

An investigation of the specificity of research antibodies against NF-κB-subunit p65.

  • Slotta C
  • J. Histochem. Cytochem.
  • 2014 Feb 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

Funding information:
  • Cancer Research UK - (United Kingdom)
  • NLM NIH HHS - 4R00LM-010943-02(United States)

Cautionary notes on the use of NF-κB p65 and p50 antibodies for CNS studies.

  • Herkenham M
  • J Neuroinflammation
  • 2011 Oct 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The characterization and cellular localization of transcription factors like NF-κB requires the use of antibodies for western blots and immunohistochemistry. However, if target protein levels are low and the antibodies not well characterized, false positive data can result. In studies of NF-κB activity in the CNS, antibodies detecting NF-κB proteins have been used to support the finding that NF-κB is constitutively active in neurons, and activity levels are further increased by neurotoxic treatments, glutamate stimulation, or elevated synaptic activity. The specificity of the antibodies used was analyzed in this study. METHODS: Selectivity and nonselectivity of commonly used commercial and non-commercial p50 and p65 antibodies were demonstrated in western blot assays conducted in tissues from mutant gene knockout mice lacking the target proteins. RESULTS: A few antibodies for p50 and p65 each mark a single band at the appropriate molecular weight in gels containing proteins from wildtype tissue, and this band is absent in proteins from knockout tissues. Several antibodies mark proteins that are present in knockout tissues, indicating that they are nonspecific. These include antibodies raised against the peptide sequence containing the nuclear localization signals of p65 (MAB3026; Chemicon) and p50 (sc-114; Santa Cruz). Some antibodies that recognize target proteins at the correct molecular weight still fail in western blot analysis because they also mark additional proteins and inconsistently so. We show that the criterion for validation by use of blocking peptides can still fail the test of specificity, as demonstrated for several antibodies raised against p65 phosphorylated at serine 276. Finally, even antibodies that show specificity in western blots produce nonspecific neuronal staining by immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSIONS: We note that many of the findings in the literature about neuronal NF-κB are based on data garnered with antibodies that are not selective for the NF-κB subunit proteins p65 and p50. The data urge caution in interpreting studies of neuronal NF-κB activity in the brain.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS-23805(United States)

Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, inhibits MMP-9-related brain hemorrhage in rats treated with tissue plasminogen activator.

  • Yagi K
  • Stroke
  • 2009 Feb 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracerebral hemorrhage, induced by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) in ischemic stroke, is attributable to the increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Patients with acute infarct benefit from the neuroprotective drug edaravone, a free radical scavenger. We examined the mechanisms by which edaravone may help to suppress rtPA-induced brain hemorrhage. METHODS: Male Wistar rats weighing 250 to 280 g were subjected to 3-hour transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and divided randomly into 3 groups. Immediately after reperfusion, 1 group was intravenously injected with 10 mg/kg rtPA, another with rtPA plus 3 mg/kg edaravone, and the 3rd group received no treatment. We assessed the hemorrhage volume and the activity of MMP-9 in the brain 24 hours postischemia. We also studied the activity of MMP-9, its mRNA expression, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) activity in rtPA-stimulated human microvascular endothelial cells (HBECs). RESULTS: The degree of hemorrhage and the level of endothelial cell-derived MMP-9 were elevated in rats treated with rtPA alone and attenuated in rats treated with rtPA plus edaravone. In rtPA-stimulated HBECs, edaravone suppressed the activity and mRNA expression of MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Edaravone also inhibited NF-kappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that edaravone inhibits rtPA-induced cerebral hemorrhage in the ischemic brain of rats via the inhibition of MMP-9 expression in vivo, which is substantiated by inhibition of MMP-9 expression and NF-kappaB activation in HBECs. Edaravone may render thrombolytic therapy safer for the administration of rtPA in patients with ischemic stroke.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - Z01 DA000472-04(United States)

Activated nuclear transcription factor kappaB in patients with myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy--relation to inflammation and cardiac function.

  • Alter P
  • Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
  • 2006 Jan 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

OBJECTIVES AND BACKGROUND: Myocarditis is caused by various agents and autoimmune processes. It is unknown whether viral genome persistence represents inactive remnants of previous infections or whether it is attributed to ongoing adverse processes. The latter also applies to the course of autoimmune myocarditis. One principal candidate for an adverse remodeling is nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB). METHODS: A total of 93 patients with suspected myocarditis/cardiomyopathy was examined. Hemodynamics were assessed by echocardiography as well as right and left heart catheterization. Endomyocardial biopsies were taken from the left ventricle. Biopsies were examined by immunohistochemistry and PCR for viral genomes. Selective immunostaining of activated NFkappaB was performed. RESULTS: NFkappaB was increased in patients with myocarditis when compared with controls (11.1+/-7.1% vs. 5.0+/-5.3%, P<0.005) whereas dilated cardiomyopathy showed no significant increase. Patients with myocarditis and preserved left ventricular function exhibited increased activated NFkappaB when compared with reduced function (r2=0.72, P<0.001). In parallel, inverse correlation of NFkappaB and left ventricular enddiasstolic volume was found (r2=0.43, P<0.02). Increased activated NFkappaB was found in adenovirus persistence when compared with controls (P=0.001). Only a trend of increased NFkappaB activation was seen in cytomegalovirus persistence. Parvovirus B19 persistence did not affect NFkappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: Increased activation of NFkappaB is related to inflammatory processes in myocarditis. Since activated NFkappaB correlates with left ventricular function, it could be assumed that NFkappaB activation occurs at early stages of inflammation. Potentially, NFkappaB could inhibit loss of cardiomyocytes by apoptosis and protect from cardiac dilation. Since NFkappaB is a crucial key transcription factor of inflammation, its prognostic and future therapeutic relevance should be addressed.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - 1R01GM081070-01(United Kingdom)

Selective recognition of the activated form of transcription factor NF-kappa B by a monoclonal antibody.

  • Kaltschmidt C
  • Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler
  • 1995 Jan 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Transcription factor NF-kappa B is a central regulator of inflammatory, immune and acute phase reactions. It rapidly initiates the transcription of a wide variety of target genes in response to various pathogenic stimuli. Because NF-kappa B is predominantly controlled at a posttranscriptional level through association with the inhibitory I kappa B subunits, its activation cannot be monitored directly at a cellular level by means of detecting new mRNA or protein synthesis. In this study, we describe a monoclonal antibody, designated alpha-p65MAb, that recognizes an epitope which includes the nuclear location signal (NLS) of p65, the DNA binding subunit mainly responsible for the strong gene-inductory potential of NF-kappa B. alpha-p65MAb recognized human and rodent p65 only when I kappa B alpha was not bound to p65. Thus, the IgG3 selectively stained the activated, nuclear form of NF-kappa B in cultured cells. Unlike I kappa B, the MAb and its Fab fragments did not inhibit the DNA binding activity of NF-kappa B in mobility shift assays. We show that alpha-p65MAb is suitable to study the activation state of NF-kappa B in cryosections of tissues.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - U54 HG004028(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS13034(United States)

Constitutive NF-kappa B activity in neurons.

  • Kaltschmidt C
  • Mol. Cell. Biol.
  • 1994 Jun 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

NF-kappa B is inducible transcription factor present in many cell types in a latent cytoplasmic form. So far, only immune cells including mature B cells, thymocytes, and adherent macrophages have been reported to contain constitutively active forms of NF-kappa B in the nucleus. A recent study showed that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promoter is highly active in several brain regions of transgenic mice (J. R. Corboy, J. M. Buzy, M. C. Zink, and J. E. Clements, Science 258:1804-1807, 1992). Since the activity of this viral enhancer is governed mainly by two binding sites for NF-kappa B, we were prompted to investigate the state of NF-kappa B activity in neurons. Primary neuronal cultures derived from rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex showed a high constitutive expression of an HIV-1 long terminal repeat-driven luciferase reporter gene, which was primarily dependent on intact NF-kappa B binding sites and was abolished upon coexpression of the NF-kappa B-specific inhibitor I kappa B-alpha. Indirect immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy showed that the activity of NF-kappa B correlated with the presence of the NF-kappa B subunits p50 and RelA (p65) in nuclei of cultured neurons. NF-kappa B was also constitutively active in neurons in vivo. As investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, constitutive NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity was highly enriched in fractions containing neuronal nuclei prepared from rat cerebral cortex. Nuclear NF-kappa B-specific immunostaining was also seen in cryosections from mouse cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Only a subset of neurons was stained. Activated NF-kappa B in the brain is likely to participate in normal brain function and to reflect a distinct state of neuronal activity or differentiation. Furthermore, it may explain the high level of activity of the HIV-1 enhancer in neurons, an observation potentially relevant for the etiology of the AIDS dementia complex caused by HIV infection of the central nervous system.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01-GM37136(United States)
  • PHS HHS - HHSN266200400037C(United States)