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Phospho-c-Jun (Ser63) II Antibody

RRID:AB_2130162

Antibody ID

AB_2130162

Target Antigen

Phospho-c-Jun (Ser63) II porcine, mouse, rat, human, non-human primate, h, m, r, mk, pg

Proper Citation

(Cell Signaling Technology Cat# 9261, RRID:AB_2130162)

Clonality

polyclonal antibody

Comments

Applications: W, IP. Consolidation on 10/2018: AB_10078585, AB_10104775, AB_2130159, AB_2130162.

Host Organism

rabbit

Vendor

Cell Signaling Technology

Dual leucine zipper kinase is required for mechanical allodynia and microgliosis after nerve injury.

  • Wlaschin JJ
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jul 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neuropathic pain resulting from nerve injury can become persistent and difficult to treat but the molecular signaling responsible for its development remains poorly described. Here, we identify the neuronal stress sensor dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK; Map3k12) as a key molecule controlling the maladaptive pathways that lead to pain following injury. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of DLK reduces mechanical hypersensitivity in a mouse model of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, DLK inhibition also prevents the spinal cord microgliosis that results from nerve injury and arises distant from the injury site. These striking phenotypes result from the control by DLK of a transcriptional program in somatosensory neurons regulating the expression of numerous genes implicated in pain pathogenesis, including the immune gene Csf1. Thus, activation of DLK is an early event, or even the master regulator, controlling a wide variety of pathways downstream of nerve injury that ultimately lead to chronic pain.

Funding information:
  • National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health - Intramural Research Program()
  • National Institute of Child Heath and Human Development - Intramural Research Program()
  • National Institutes of Health - Intramural Research Program - DDIR Innovation Award()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA33572(United States)

Brimapitide Reduced Neuronal Stress Markers and Cognitive Deficits in 5XFAD Transgenic Mice.

  • Gourmaud S
  • J. Alzheimers Dis.
  • 2018 Apr 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by accumulations of amyloid-β (Aβ42) and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins, associated with neuroinflammation, synaptic loss, and neuronal death. Several studies indicate that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is implicated in the pathological features of AD. We have investigated in 5XFAD mice, the therapeutic effects of Brimapitide, a JNK-specific inhibitory peptide previously tested with higher concentrations in another AD model (TgCRND8). Three-month-old 5XFAD and wild-type littermate mice were treated by intravenous injections of low doses (10 mg/kg) of Brimapitide every 3 weeks, for 3 or 6 months (n = 6-9 per group). Cognitive deficits and brain lesions were assessed using Y-maze, fear-conditioning test, and histological and biochemical methods. Chronic treatment of Brimapitide for 3 months resulted in a reduction of Aβ plaque burden in the cortex of 5XFAD treated mice. After 6 months of treatment, cognitive deficits were reduced but also a significant reduction of cell death markers and the pro-inflammatory IL-1β cytokine in treated mice were detected. The Aβ plaque burden was not anymore modified by the 6 months of treatment. In addition to modulating cognition and amyloid plaque accumulation, depending on the treatment duration, Brimapitide seems experimentally to reduce neuronal stress in 5XFAD mice.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK080852(United States)

Crosstalk control and limits of physiological c-Jun N-terminal kinase activity for cell viability and neurite stability in differentiated PC12 cells.

  • Waetzig V
  • Mol. Cell. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Apr 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are important mediators of cell viability and structural integrity in postmitotic neurons, which is required for maintaining synaptic connections and neural plasticity. In the present study, we chose differentiated PC12 cells as a well-characterised neuronal model system to selectively examine the regulation of basal JNK activity by extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt. We detected a complex interaction between the kinases to prevent cell death and neurite loss. Especially the appropriate level of JNK activation determined cellular survival. Basal activity of ERK1/2 attenuated the potentiation of JNK phosphorylation and thereby the induction of apoptosis. Importantly, when JNK activity was too low, cell viability and the number of neurite-bearing cells also decreased, even though the activation of ERK1/2 was enhanced. In this case, the JNK-mediated survival signals via activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) were inhibited. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by the JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited the basal activity of Akt, which normally supported cell viability. Thus, controlling JNK activity is crucial to promote survival and neurite stability of differentiated neuronal cells.

Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibition With Saxagliptin Ameliorates Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Diastolic Dysfunction in Male Mice.

  • Brown SM
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is common in hypertension and obesity and contributes to cardiac diastolic dysfunction, a condition for which no treatment currently exists. In light of recent reports that antihyperglycemia incretin enhancing dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors exert cardioprotective effects, we examined the hypothesis that DPP-4 inhibition with saxagliptin (Saxa) attenuates angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac diastolic dysfunction. Male C57BL/6J mice were infused with either Ang II (500 ng/kg/min) or vehicle for 3 weeks receiving either Saxa (10 mg/kg/d) or placebo during the final 2 weeks. Echocardiography revealed Ang II-induced diastolic dysfunction, evidenced by impaired septal wall motion and prolonged isovolumic relaxation, coincident with aortic stiffening. Ang II induced cardiac hypertrophy, coronary periarterial fibrosis, TRAF3-interacting protein 2 (TRAF3IP2)-dependent proinflammatory signaling [p-p65, p-c-Jun, interleukin (IL)-17, IL-18] associated with increased cardiac macrophage, but not T cell, gene expression. Flow cytometry revealed Ang II-induced increases of cardiac CD45+F4/80+CD11b+ and CD45+F4/80+CD11c+ macrophages and CD45+CD4+ lymphocytes. Treatment with Saxa reduced plasma DPP-4 activity and abrogated Ang II-induced cardiac diastolic dysfunction independent of aortic stiffening or blood pressure. Furthermore, Saxa attenuated Ang II-induced periarterial fibrosis and cardiac inflammation, but not hypertrophy or cardiac macrophage infiltration. Analysis of Saxa-induced changes in cardiac leukocytes revealed Saxa-dependent reduction of the Ang II-mediated increase of cardiac CD11c messenger RNA and increased cardiac CD8 gene expression and memory CD45+CD8+CD44+ lymphocytes. In summary, these results demonstrate that DPP-4 inhibition with Saxa prevents Ang II-induced cardiac diastolic dysfunction, fibrosis, and inflammation associated with unique shifts in CD11c-expressing leukocytes and CD8+ lymphocytes.

Enhanced Functional Genomic Screening Identifies Novel Mediators of Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase-Dependent Injury Signaling in Neurons.

  • Welsbie DS
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Jun 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) has been implicated in cell death signaling secondary to axonal damage in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and other neurons. To better understand the pathway through which DLK acts, we developed enhanced functional genomic screens in primary RGCs, including use of arrayed, whole-genome, small interfering RNA libraries. Explaining why DLK inhibition is only partially protective, we identify leucine zipper kinase (LZK) as cooperating with DLK to activate downstream signaling and cell death in RGCs, including in a mouse model of optic nerve injury, and show that the same pathway is active in human stem cell-derived RGCs. Moreover, we identify four transcription factors, JUN, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2), myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), and SRY-Box 11 (SOX11), as being the major downstream mediators through which DLK/LZK activation leads to RGC cell death. Increased understanding of the DLK pathway has implications for understanding and treating neurodegenerative diseases.

An Intrinsic Epigenetic Barrier for Functional Axon Regeneration.

  • Weng YL
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Apr 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mature neurons in the adult peripheral nervous system can effectively switch from a dormant state with little axonal growth to robust axon regeneration upon injury. The mechanisms by which injury unlocks mature neurons' intrinsic axonal growth competence are not well understood. Here, we show that peripheral sciatic nerve lesion in adult mice leads to elevated levels of Tet3 and 5-hydroxylmethylcytosine in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Functionally, Tet3 is required for robust axon regeneration of DRG neurons and behavioral recovery. Mechanistically, peripheral nerve injury induces DNA demethylation and upregulation of multiple regeneration-associated genes in a Tet3- and thymine DNA glycosylase-dependent fashion in DRG neurons. In addition, Pten deletion-induced axon regeneration of retinal ganglion neurons in the adult CNS is attenuated upon Tet1 knockdown. Together, our study suggests an epigenetic barrier that can be removed by active DNA demethylation to permit axon regeneration in the adult mammalian nervous system.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007814()

Dual leucine zipper kinase-dependent PERK activation contributes to neuronal degeneration following insult.

  • Larhammar M
  • Elife
  • 2017 Apr 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

The PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) arm of the Integrated Stress Response (ISR) is implicated in neurodegenerative disease, although the regulators and consequences of PERK activation following neuronal injury are poorly understood. Here we show that PERK signaling is a component of the mouse MAP kinase neuronal stress response controlled by the Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase (DLK) and contributes to DLK-mediated neurodegeneration. We find that DLK-activating insults ranging from nerve injury to neurotrophin deprivation result in both c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling and the PERK- and ISR-dependent upregulation of the Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4). Disruption of PERK signaling delays neurodegeneration without reducing JNK signaling. Furthermore, DLK is both sufficient for PERK activation and necessary for engaging the ISR subsequent to JNK-mediated retrograde injury signaling. These findings identify DLK as a central regulator of not only JNK but also PERK stress signaling in neurons, with both pathways contributing to neurodegeneration.

An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis.

  • Vernia S
  • Elife
  • 2016 Sep 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia.

Suppression of ischemia in arterial occlusive disease by JNK-promoted native collateral artery development.

  • Ramo K
  • Elife
  • 2016 Aug 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Arterial occlusive diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Blood flow to the affected tissue must be restored quickly if viability and function are to be preserved. We report that disruption of the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK) - cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway in endothelial cells causes severe blockade of blood flow and failure to recover in the murine femoral artery ligation model of hindlimb ischemia. We show that the MLK-JNK pathway is required for the formation of native collateral arteries that can restore circulation following arterial occlusion. Disruption of the MLK-JNK pathway causes decreased Dll4/Notch signaling, excessive sprouting angiogenesis, and defects in developmental vascular morphogenesis. Our analysis demonstrates that the MLK-JNK signaling pathway is a key regulatory mechanism that protects against ischemia in arterial occlusive disease.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - K01 MH109747(United States)