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GABA(A)R, Beta3 antibody

RRID:AB_2109585

Antibody ID

AB_2109585

Target Antigen

GABA(A)R Beta3 null

Proper Citation

(UC Davis/NIH NeuroMab Facility Cat# 75-149, RRID:AB_2109585)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Comments

Originating manufacturer of this product. Applications: IB, ICC, IHC, WB. Validation status: IF or IB (Pass), IB in brain (Pass), IHC in brain (Pass), KO (ND).

Clone ID

N87/25

Host Organism

mouse

Cadherin-10 Maintains Excitatory/Inhibitory Ratio through Interactions with Synaptic Proteins.

  • Smith KR
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Nov 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Appropriate excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) balance is essential for normal cortical function and is altered in some psychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Cell-autonomous molecular mechanisms that control the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synapse function remain poorly understood; no proteins that regulate excitatory and inhibitory synapse strength in a coordinated reciprocal manner have been identified. Using super-resolution imaging, electrophysiology, and molecular manipulations, we show that cadherin-10, encoded by CDH10 within the ASD risk locus 5p14.1, maintains both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic scaffold structure in cultured cortical neurons from rats of both sexes. Cadherin-10 localizes to both excitatory and inhibitory synapses in neocortex, where it is organized into nanoscale puncta that influence the size of their associated PSDs. Knockdown of cadherin-10 reduces excitatory but increases inhibitory synapse size and strength, altering the E/I ratio in cortical neurons. Furthermore, cadherin-10 exhibits differential participation in complexes with PSD-95 and gephyrin, which may underlie its role in maintaining the E/I ratio. Our data provide a new mechanism whereby a protein encoded by a common ASD risk factor controls E/I ratios by regulating excitatory and inhibitory synapses in opposing directions.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The correct balance between excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) is crucial for normal brain function and is altered in psychiatric disorders such as autism. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie this balance remain elusive. To address this, we studied cadherin-10, an adhesion protein that is genetically linked to autism and understudied at the cellular level. Using a combination of advanced microscopy techniques and electrophysiology, we show that cadherin-10 forms nanoscale puncta at excitatory and inhibitory synapses, maintains excitatory and inhibitory synaptic structure, and is essential for maintaining the correct balance between excitation and inhibition in neuronal dendrites. These findings reveal a new mechanism by which E/I balance is controlled in neurons and may bear relevance to synaptic dysfunction in autism.

Similar GABAA receptor subunit composition in somatic and axon initial segment synapses of hippocampal pyramidal cells.

  • Kerti-Szigeti K
  • Elife
  • 2016 Aug 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hippocampal pyramidal cells (PCs) express many GABAAR subunit types and receive GABAergic inputs from distinct interneurons. Previous experiments revealed input-specific differences in α1 and α2 subunit densities in perisomatic synapses, suggesting distinct IPSC decay kinetics. However, IPSC decays evoked by axo-axonic, parvalbumin- or cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells were found to be similar. Using replica immunogold labeling, here we show that all CA1 PC somatic and AIS synapses contain the α1, α2, β1, β2, β3 and γ2 subunits. In CA3 PCs, 90% of the perisomatic synapses are immunopositive for the α1 subunit and all synapses are positive for the remaining five subunits. Somatic synapses form unimodal distributions based on their immunoreactivity for these subunits. The α2 subunit densities in somatic synapses facing Cav2.1 (i.e. parvalbumin) or Cav2.2 (cholecystokinin) positive presynaptic active zones are comparable. We conclude that perisomatic synapses made by three distinct interneuron types have similar GABAA receptor subunit content.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R37 AG008796(United States)

SHANK3 overexpression causes manic-like behaviour with unique pharmacogenetic properties.

  • Han K
  • Nature
  • 2013 Nov 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mutations in SHANK3 and large duplications of the region spanning SHANK3 both cause a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders, indicating that proper SHANK3 dosage is critical for normal brain function. However, SHANK3 overexpression per se has not been established as a cause of human disorders because 22q13 duplications involve several genes. Here we report that Shank3 transgenic mice modelling a human SHANK3 duplication exhibit manic-like behaviour and seizures consistent with synaptic excitatory/inhibitory imbalance. We also identified two patients with hyperkinetic disorders carrying the smallest SHANK3-spanning duplications reported so far. These findings indicate that SHANK3 overexpression causes a hyperkinetic neuropsychiatric disorder. To probe the mechanism underlying the phenotype, we generated a Shank3 in vivo interactome and found that Shank3 directly interacts with the Arp2/3 complex to increase F-actin levels in Shank3 transgenic mice. The mood-stabilizing drug valproate, but not lithium, rescues the manic-like behaviour of Shank3 transgenic mice raising the possibility that this hyperkinetic disorder has a unique pharmacogenetic profile.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - G0800578(United Kingdom)

Defining the diversity of phenotypic respecification using multiple cell lines and reprogramming regimens.

  • Alicea B
  • Stem Cells Dev.
  • 2013 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

To better understand the basis of variation in cellular reprogramming, we performed experiments with two primary objectives: first, to determine the degree of difference, if any, in reprogramming efficiency among cells lines of a similar type after accounting for technical variables, and second, to compare the efficiency of conversion of multiple similar cell lines to two separate reprogramming regimens-induced neurons and induced skeletal muscle. Using two reprogramming regimens, it could be determined whether converted cells are likely derived from a distinct subpopulation that is generally susceptible to reprogramming or are derived from cells with an independent capacity for respecification to a given phenotype. Our results indicated that when technical components of the reprogramming regimen were accounted for, reprogramming efficiency was reproducible within a given primary fibroblast line but varied dramatically between lines. The disparity in reprogramming efficiency between lines was of sufficient magnitude to account for some discrepancies in published results. We also found that the efficiency of conversion to one phenotype was not predictive of reprogramming to the alternate phenotype, suggesting that the capacity for reprogramming does not arise from a specific subpopulation with a generally "weak grip" on cellular identity. Our findings suggest that parallel testing of multiple cell lines from several sources may be needed to accurately assess the efficiency of direct reprogramming procedures, and that testing a larger number of fibroblast lines--even lines with similar origins--is likely the most direct means of improving reprogramming efficiency.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - R01 HG005238(United States)

Altered cortical GABAA receptor composition, physiology, and endocytosis in a mouse model of a human genetic absence epilepsy syndrome.

  • Zhou C
  • J. Biol. Chem.
  • 2013 Jul 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Patients with generalized epilepsy exhibit cerebral cortical disinhibition. Likewise, mutations in the inhibitory ligand-gated ion channels, GABAA receptors (GABAARs), cause generalized epilepsy syndromes in humans. Recently, we demonstrated that heterozygous knock-out (Hetα1KO) of the human epilepsy gene, the GABAAR α1 subunit, produced absence epilepsy in mice. Here, we determined the effects of Hetα1KO on the expression and physiology of GABAARs in the mouse cortex. We found that Hetα1KO caused modest reductions in the total and surface expression of the β2 subunit but did not alter β1 or β3 subunit expression, results consistent with a small reduction of GABAARs. Cortices partially compensated for Hetα1KO by increasing the fraction of residual α1 subunit on the cell surface and by increasing total and surface expression of α3, but not α2, subunits. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Hetα1KO increased the fraction of α1 subunits, and decreased the fraction of α3 subunits, that associated in hybrid α1α3βγ receptors. Patch clamp electrophysiology studies showed that Hetα1KO layer VI cortical neurons exhibited reduced inhibitory postsynaptic current peak amplitudes, prolonged current rise and decay times, and altered responses to benzodiazepine agonists. Finally, application of inhibitors of dynamin-mediated endocytosis revealed that Hetα1KO reduced base-line GABAAR endocytosis, an effect that probably contributes to the observed changes in GABAAR expression. These findings demonstrate that Hetα1KO exerts two principle disinhibitory effects on cortical GABAAR-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission: 1) a modest reduction of GABAAR number and 2) a partial compensation with GABAAR isoforms that possess physiological properties different from those of the otherwise predominant α1βγ GABAARs.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - BB/J010375/1(United Kingdom)

GABAergic signaling is linked to a hypermigratory phenotype in dendritic cells infected by Toxoplasma gondii.

  • Fuks JM
  • PLoS Pathog.
  • 2012 Dec 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

During acute infection in human and animal hosts, the obligate intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of cell types, including leukocytes. Poised to respond to invading pathogens, dendritic cells (DC) may also be exploited by T. gondii for spread in the infected host. Here, we report that human and mouse myeloid DC possess functional γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors and the machinery for GABA biosynthesis and secretion. Shortly after T. gondii infection (genotypes I, II and III), DC responded with enhanced GABA secretion in vitro. We demonstrate that GABA activates GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in T. gondii-infected DC, which exhibit a hypermigratory phenotype. Inhibition of GABA synthesis, transportation or GABA(A) receptor blockade in T. gondii-infected DC resulted in impaired transmigration capacity, motility and chemotactic response to CCL19 in vitro. Moreover, exogenous GABA or supernatant from infected DC restored the migration of infected DC in vitro. In a mouse model of toxoplasmosis, adoptive transfer of infected DC pre-treated with GABAergic inhibitors reduced parasite dissemination and parasite loads in target organs, e.g. the central nervous system. Altogether, we provide evidence that GABAergic signaling modulates the migratory properties of DC and that T. gondii likely makes use of this pathway for dissemination. The findings unveil that GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, has activation functions in the immune system that may be hijacked by intracellular pathogens.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS40296(United States)

Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes.

  • Mendu SK
  • PLoS ONE
  • 2012 Aug 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most prominent neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain, where it activates neuronal GABA-A receptors (GABA-A channels) located at synapses and outside of synapses. The GABA-A receptors are primary targets of many clinically useful drugs. In recent years, GABA has been shown to act as an immunomodulatory molecule. We have examined in human, mouse and rat CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells which subunit isoforms of the GABA-A channels are expressed. The channel physiology and drug specificity is dictated by the GABA-A receptor subtype, which in turn is determined by the subunit isoforms that make the channel. There were 5, 8 and 13 different GABA-A subunit isoforms identified in human, mouse and rat CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, respectively. Importantly, the γ2 subunit that imposes benzodiazepine sensitivity on the GABA-A receptors, was only detected in the mouse T cells. Immunoblots and immunocytochemistry showed abundant GABA-A channel proteins in the T cells from all three species. GABA-activated whole-cell transient and tonic currents were recorded. The currents were inhibited by picrotoxin, SR95531 and bicuculline, antagonists of GABA-A channels. Clearly, in both humans and rodents T cells, functional GABA-A channels are expressed but the subtypes vary. It is important to bear in mind the interspecies difference when selecting the appropriate animal models to study the physiological role and pharmacological properties of GABA-A channels in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and when selecting drugs aimed at modulating the human T cells function.

Funding information:
  • Cancer Research UK - C14303/A10825(United Kingdom)

GABRB3 mutation, G32R, associated with childhood absence epilepsy alters α1β3γ2L γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor expression and channel gating.

  • Gurba KN
  • J. Biol. Chem.
  • 2012 Apr 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

A GABA(A) receptor β3 subunit mutation, G32R, has been associated with childhood absence epilepsy. We evaluated the possibility that this mutation, which is located adjacent to the most N-terminal of three β3 subunit N-glycosylation sites, might reduce GABAergic inhibition by increasing glycosylation of β3 subunits. The mutation had three major effects on GABA(A) receptors. First, coexpression of β3(G32R) subunits with α1 or α3 and γ2L subunits in HEK293T cells reduced surface expression of γ2L subunits and increased surface expression of β3 subunits, suggesting a partial shift from ternary αβ3γ2L receptors to binary αβ3 and homomeric β3 receptors. Second, β3(G32R) subunits were more likely than β3 subunits to be N-glycosylated at Asn-33, but increases in glycosylation were not responsible for changes in subunit surface expression. Rather, both phenomena could be attributed to the presence of a basic residue at position 32. Finally, α1β3(G32R)γ2L receptors had significantly reduced macroscopic current density. This reduction could not be explained fully by changes in subunit expression levels (because γ2L levels decreased only slightly) or glycosylation (because reduction persisted in the absence of glycosylation at Asn-33). Single channel recording revealed that α1β3(G32R)γ2L receptors had impaired gating with shorter mean open time. Homology modeling indicated that the mutation altered salt bridges at subunit interfaces, including regions important for subunit oligomerization. Our results suggest both a mechanism for mutation-induced hyperexcitability and a novel role for the β3 subunit N-terminal α-helix in receptor assembly and gating.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - 5R01NS056307-08(United States)

GABAA receptors involved in sleep and anaesthesia: β1- versus β3-containing assemblies.

  • Yanovsky Y
  • Pflugers Arch.
  • 2012 Jan 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

The histaminergic neurons of the posterior hypothalamus (tuberomamillary nucleus-TMN) control wakefulness, and their silencing through activation of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R) induces sleep and is thought to mediate sedation under propofol anaesthesia. We have previously shown that the β1 subunit preferring fragrant dioxane derivatives (FDD) are highly potent modulators of GABA(A)R in TMN neurons. In recombinant receptors containing the β3N265M subunit, FDD action is abolished and GABA potency is reduced. Using rat, wild-type and β3N265M mice, FDD and propofol, we explored the relative contributions of β1- and β3-containing GABA(A)R to synaptic transmission from the GABAergic sleep-on ventrolateral preoptic area neurons to TMN. In β3N265M mice, GABA potency remained unchanged in TMN neurons, but it was decreased in cultured posterior hypothalamic neurons with impaired modulation of GABA(A)R by propofol. Spontaneous and evoked GABAergic synaptic currents (IPSC) showed β1-type pharmacology, with the same effects achieved by 3 μM propofol and 10 μM PI24513. Propofol and the FDD PI24513 suppressed neuronal firing in the majority of neurons at 5 and 100 μM, and in all cells at 10 and 250 μM, respectively. FDD given systemically in mice induced sedation but not anaesthesia. Propofol-induced currents were abolished (1-6 μM) or significantly reduced (12 μM) in β3N265M mice, whereas gating and modulation of GABA(A)R by PI24513 as well as modulation by propofol were unchanged. In conclusion, β1-containing (FDD-sensitive) GABA(A)R represent the major receptor pool in TMN neurons responding to GABA, while β3-containing (FDD-insensitive) receptors are gated by low micromolar doses of propofol. Thus, sleep and anaesthesia depend on different GABA(A)R types.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM100366(United States)

Cross-talk between P2X4 and gamma-aminobutyric acid, type A receptors determines synaptic efficacy at a central synapse.

  • Jo YH
  • J. Biol. Chem.
  • 2011 Jun 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

The essence of neuronal function is to generate outputs in response to synaptic potentials. Synaptic integration at postsynaptic sites determines neuronal outputs in the CNS. Using immunohistochemical and electrophysiological approaches, we first reveal that steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive neurons in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus express P2X4 subunits that are activated by exogenous ATP. Increased membrane expression of P2X4 channels by using a peptide competing with P2X4 intracellular endocytosis motif enhances neuronal excitability of SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. This increased excitability is inhibited by a P2X receptor antagonist. Furthermore, increased surface P2X4 receptor expression significantly decreases the frequency and the amplitude of GABAergic postsynaptic currents of SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. Co-immunopurification and pulldown assays reveal that P2X4 receptors complex with aminobutyric acid, type A (GABA(A)) receptors and demonstrate that two amino acids in the carboxyl tail of the P2X4 subunit are crucial for its physical association with GABA(A) receptors. Mutation of these two residues prevents the physical association, thereby blocking cross-inhibition between P2X4 and GABA(A) receptors. Moreover, disruption of the physical coupling using competitive peptides containing the identified motif abolishes current inhibition between P2X4 and GABA(A) receptors in recombinant system and P2X4 receptor-mediated GABAergic depression in SF-1 GFP-positive neurons. Our present work thus provides evidence for cross-talk between excitatory and inhibitory receptors that appears to be crucial in determining GABAergic synaptic strength at a central synapse.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - P 41 RR08605-06(United States)

Early developmental alterations in GABAergic protein expression in fragile X knockout mice.

  • Adusei DC
  • Neuropharmacology
  • 2010 Sep 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Fragile X syndrome is the most common heritable form of mental retardation. It is caused by silencing of the Fmr1 gene and the absence of the encoded protein. The purpose of this study was to examine global protein expression levels of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors, and GABAergic enzymes and trafficking proteins in fragile X knockout mice during brain maturation. Quantitative western blotting of homogenates of forebrain revealed that the levels of GABA(A) beta1 and beta3, GABA(B)-R1, NKCC1, KCC2, gephyrin and ubiquilin were not significantly different from wild-type mice at any of the postnatal time points examined. In contrast, the GABA(A) receptor alpha1, beta2, and delta subunits, and the GABA enzymes GABA transaminase and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase were down-regulated during postnatal development, while GAD65 was up-regulated in the adult knockout mouse brain. The GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and beta2 subunits displayed a divergent pattern of developmental expression whereby alpha1 was reduced in the immature brain but regained a level of expression similar to wild-type mice by adulthood, while the expression of beta2 was similar to wild-types at postnatal day 5 but reduced at day 12 and in the adult brain. The GABA(A) receptor delta subunit and the GABA catabolic enzymes GABA transaminase and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase were simultaneously but transiently decreased only at postnatal day 12. Our results demonstrate that GABA(A) receptor subunits and GABA enzymes display complex patterns of changes during brain development suggesting that dynamic interactions may occur between GABA transmitter levels and GABA receptors in fragile X syndrome.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - 1R21HG006171-01(United States)

Ubiquitin-dependent lysosomal targeting of GABA(A) receptors regulates neuronal inhibition.

  • Arancibia-Cárcamo IL
  • Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • 2009 Oct 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

The strength of synaptic inhibition depends partly on the number of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) found at synaptic sites. The trafficking of GABA(A)Rs within the endocytic pathway is a key determinant of surface GABA(A)R number and is altered in neuropathologies, such as cerebral ischemia. However, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that regulate this trafficking are poorly understood. Here, we report the subunit specific lysosomal targeting of synaptic GABA(A)Rs. We demonstrate that the targeting of synaptic GABA(A)Rs into the degradation pathway is facilitated by ubiquitination of a motif within the intracellular domain of the gamma2 subunit. Blockade of lysosomal activity or disruption of the trafficking of ubiquitinated cargo to lysosomes specifically increases the efficacy of synaptic inhibition without altering excitatory currents. Moreover, mutation of the ubiquitination site within the gamma2 subunit retards the lysosomal targeting of GABA(A)Rs and is sufficient to block the loss of synaptic GABA(A)Rs after anoxic insult. Together, our results establish a previously unknown mechanism for influencing inhibitory transmission under normal and pathological conditions.