X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

Goat Anti-Rat IgG (H+L) Antibody, Alexa Fluor ?? 594 Conjugated

RRID:AB_141374

Antibody ID

AB_141374

Target Antigen

Rat IgG (H+L) rat

Proper Citation

(Molecular Probes Cat# A-11007, RRID:AB_141374)

Clonality

unknown

Comments

Discontinued; This product offered by Molecular Probes (Invitrogen), now part of Thermo Fisher:

Host Organism

goat

Vendor

Molecular Probes

Genome-wide Control of Heterochromatin Replication by the Telomere Capping Protein TRF2.

  • Mendez-Bermudez A
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hard-to-replicate regions of chromosomes (e.g., pericentromeres, centromeres, and telomeres) impede replication fork progression, eventually leading, in the event of replication stress, to chromosome fragility, aging, and cancer. Our knowledge of the mechanisms controlling the stability of these regions is essentially limited to telomeres, where fragility is counteracted by the shelterin proteins. Here we show that the shelterin subunit TRF2 ensures progression of the replication fork through pericentromeric heterochromatin, but not centromeric chromatin. In a process involving its N-terminal basic domain, TRF2 binds to pericentromeric Satellite III sequences during S phase, allowing the recruitment of the G-quadruplex-resolving helicase RTEL1 to facilitate fork progression. We also show that TRF2 is required for the stability of other heterochromatic regions localized throughout the genome, paving the way for future research on heterochromatic replication and its relationship with aging and cancer.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - (United Kingdom)

Polε Instability Drives Replication Stress, Abnormal Development, and Tumorigenesis.

  • Bellelli R
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 May 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

DNA polymerase ε (POLE) is a four-subunit complex and the major leading strand polymerase in eukaryotes. Budding yeast orthologs of POLE3 and POLE4 promote Polε processivity in vitro but are dispensable for viability in vivo. Here, we report that POLE4 deficiency in mice destabilizes the entire Polε complex, leading to embryonic lethality in inbred strains and extensive developmental abnormalities, leukopenia, and tumor predisposition in outbred strains. Comparable phenotypes of growth retardation and immunodeficiency are also observed in human patients harboring destabilizing mutations in POLE1. In both Pole4-/- mouse and POLE1 mutant human cells, Polε hypomorphy is associated with replication stress and p53 activation, which we attribute to inefficient replication origin firing. Strikingly, removing p53 is sufficient to rescue embryonic lethality and all developmental abnormalities in Pole4 null mice. However, Pole4-/-p53+/- mice exhibit accelerated tumorigenesis, revealing an important role for controlled CMG and origin activation in normal development and tumor prevention.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - U01 AI070499(United States)

Low-Protein Diet Induces IRE1α-Dependent Anticancer Immunosurveillance.

  • Rubio-Patiño C
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Apr 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dietary restriction (DR) was shown to impact on tumor growth with very variable effects depending on the cancer type. However, how DR limits cancer progression remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that feeding mice a low-protein (Low PROT) isocaloric diet but not a low-carbohydrate (Low CHO) diet reduced tumor growth in three independent mouse cancer models. Surprisingly, this effect relies on anticancer immunosurveillance, as depleting CD8+ T cells, antigen-presenting cells (APCs), or using immunodeficient mice prevented the beneficial effect of the diet. Mechanistically, we established that a Low PROT diet induces the unfolded protein response (UPR) in tumor cells through the activation of IRE1α and RIG1 signaling, thereby resulting in cytokine production and mounting an efficient anticancer immune response. Collectively, our data suggest that a Low PROT diet induces an IRE1α-dependent UPR in cancer cells, enhancing a CD8-mediated T cell response against tumors.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - K08 CA163677(United States)

A Distinct Class of Genome Rearrangements Driven by Heterologous Recombination.

  • León-Ortiz AM
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Jan 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Erroneous DNA repair by heterologous recombination (Ht-REC) is a potential threat to genome stability, but evidence supporting its prevalence is lacking. Here we demonstrate that recombination is possible between heterologous sequences and that it is a source of chromosomal alterations in mitotic and meiotic cells. Mechanistically, we find that the RTEL1 and HIM-6/BLM helicases and the BRCA1 homolog BRC-1 counteract Ht-REC in Caenorhabditis elegans, whereas mismatch repair does not. Instead, MSH-2/6 drives Ht-REC events in rtel-1 and brc-1 mutants and excessive crossovers in rtel-1 mutant meioses. Loss of vertebrate Rtel1 also causes a variety of unusually large and complex structural variations, including chromothripsis, breakage-fusion-bridge events, and tandem duplications with distant intra-chromosomal insertions, whose structure are consistent with a role for RTEL1 in preventing Ht-REC during break-induced replication. Our data establish Ht-REC as an unappreciated source of genome instability that underpins a novel class of complex genome rearrangements that likely arise during replication stress.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS054221(United States)

Stabilization of Reversed Replication Forks by Telomerase Drives Telomere Catastrophe.

  • Margalef P
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jan 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Telomere maintenance critically depends on the distinct activities of telomerase, which adds telomeric repeats to solve the end replication problem, and RTEL1, which dismantles DNA secondary structures at telomeres to facilitate replisome progression. Here, we establish that reversed replication forks are a pathological substrate for telomerase and the source of telomere catastrophe in Rtel1-/- cells. Inhibiting telomerase recruitment to telomeres, but not its activity, or blocking replication fork reversal through PARP1 inhibition or depleting UBC13 or ZRANB3 prevents the rapid accumulation of dysfunctional telomeres in RTEL1-deficient cells. In this context, we establish that telomerase binding to reversed replication forks inhibits telomere replication, which can be mimicked by preventing replication fork restart through depletion of RECQ1 or PARG. Our results lead us to propose that telomerase inappropriately binds to and inhibits restart of reversed replication forks within telomeres, which compromises replication and leads to critically short telomeres.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - 100140(United Kingdom)

Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in microglia: the role of ceramide.

  • Scheiblich H
  • J. Neurochem.
  • 2017 Dec 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

Inflammation within the CNS is a major component of many neurodegenerative diseases. A characteristic feature is the generation of microglia-derived factors that play an essential role in the immune response. IL-1β is a pro-inflammatory cytokine released by activated microglia, able to exacerbate injury at elevated levels. In the presence of caspase-1, pro-IL-1β is cleaved to the mature cytokine following NOD-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation. Growing evidence suggests that ceramide plays a critical role in NLRP3 inflammasome assembly, however, the relationship between ceramide and inflammasome activation in microglia remains unknown. Here, we investigated potential mechanistic links between ceramide as a modulator of NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and the resulting secretion of IL-1β using small bioactive enzyme stimulators and inhibitors of ceramide signaling in wild-type and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD knockout (ASC-/- ) primary microglia. To induce the expression of inflammasome components, microglia were primed prior to experiments. Treatment with sodium palmitate (PA) induced de novo ceramide synthesis via modulation of its synthesizing protein serine palmitoyl transferase resulting in increased IL-1β secretion in microglia. Exposure of microglia to the serine palmitoyl transferase-inhibitor l-cycloserine significantly prevented PA-induced IL-1β secretion. Application of the ceramide analogue C2 and the sphingosine-1-phosphate-receptor agonist Fingolimod (FTY720) up-regulated levels of IL-1β and cleaved caspase-1 in wild-type microglia, whereas ASC-/- microglia were unaffected. HPA-12 inhibition of ceramide transport did not affect inflammasome activation. Taken together, our findings reveal a critical role for ceramide as a positive modulator of NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and the resulting release of IL-1β.

Restoration of Replication Fork Stability in BRCA1- and BRCA2-Deficient Cells by Inactivation of SNF2-Family Fork Remodelers.

  • Taglialatela A
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

To ensure the completion of DNA replication and maintenance of genome integrity, DNA repair factors protect stalled replication forks upon replication stress. Previous studies have identified a critical role for the tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2 in preventing the degradation of nascent DNA by the MRE11 nuclease after replication stress. Here we show that depletion of SMARCAL1, a SNF2-family DNA translocase that remodels stalled forks, restores replication fork stability and reduces the formation of replication stress-induced DNA breaks and chromosomal aberrations in BRCA1/2-deficient cells. In addition to SMARCAL1, other SNF2-family fork remodelers, including ZRANB3 and HLTF, cause nascent DNA degradation and genomic instability in BRCA1/2-deficient cells upon replication stress. Our observations indicate that nascent DNA degradation in BRCA1/2-deficient cells occurs as a consequence of MRE11-dependent nucleolytic processing of reversed forks generated by fork remodelers. These studies provide mechanistic insights into the processes that cause genome instability in BRCA1/2-deficient cells.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA197774()

Astrocyte-Secreted Glypican 4 Regulates Release of Neuronal Pentraxin 1 from Axons to Induce Functional Synapse Formation.

  • Farhy-Tselnicker I
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Oct 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

The generation of precise synaptic connections between developing neurons is critical to the formation of functional neural circuits. Astrocyte-secreted glypican 4 induces formation of active excitatory synapses by recruiting AMPA glutamate receptors to the postsynaptic cell surface. We now identify the molecular mechanism of how glypican 4 exerts its effect. Glypican 4 induces release of the AMPA receptor clustering factor neuronal pentraxin 1 from presynaptic terminals by signaling through presynaptic protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor δ. Pentraxin then accumulates AMPA receptors on the postsynaptic terminal forming functional synapses. Our findings reveal a signaling pathway that regulates synaptic activity during central nervous system development and demonstrates a role for astrocytes as organizers of active synaptic connections by coordinating both pre and post synaptic neurons. As mutations in glypicans are associated with neurological disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, this signaling cascade offers new avenues to modulate synaptic function in disease.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS089791()
  • Wellcome Trust - P30 NS072031()

aPKC Cycles between Functionally Distinct PAR Protein Assemblies to Drive Cell Polarity.

  • Rodriguez J
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Aug 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

The conserved polarity effector proteins PAR-3, PAR-6, CDC-42, and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) form a core unit of the PAR protein network, which plays a central role in polarizing a broad range of animal cell types. To functionally polarize cells, these proteins must activate aPKC within a spatially defined membrane domain on one side of the cell in response to symmetry-breaking cues. Using the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote as a model, we find that the localization and activation of aPKC involve distinct, specialized aPKC-containing assemblies: a PAR-3-dependent assembly that responds to polarity cues and promotes efficient segregation of aPKC toward the anterior but holds aPKC in an inactive state, and a CDC-42-dependent assembly in which aPKC is active but poorly segregated. Cycling of aPKC between these distinct functional assemblies, which appears to depend on aPKC activity, effectively links cue-sensing and effector roles within the PAR network to ensure robust establishment of polarity.

PP2ACdc55 Phosphatase Imposes Ordered Cell-Cycle Phosphorylation by Opposing Threonine Phosphorylation.

  • Godfrey M
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Feb 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the quantitative model of cell-cycle control, progression from G1 through S phase and into mitosis is ordered by thresholds of increasing cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity. How such thresholds are read out by substrates that respond with the correct phosphorylation timing is not known. Here, using the budding yeast model, we show that the abundant PP2ACdc55 phosphatase counteracts Cdk phosphorylation during interphase and delays phosphorylation of late Cdk substrates. PP2ACdc55 specifically counteracts phosphorylation on threonine residues, and consequently, we find that threonine-directed phosphorylation occurs late in the cell cycle. Furthermore, the late phosphorylation of a model substrate, Ndd1, depends on threonine identity of its Cdk target sites. Our results support a model in which Cdk-counteracting phosphatases contribute to cell-cycle ordering by imposing Cdk thresholds. They also unveil a regulatory principle based on the phosphoacceptor amino acid, which is likely to apply to signaling pathways beyond cell-cycle control.

Development of neuromuscular organization in the ctenophore Pleurobrachia bachei.

  • Norekian TP
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2016 Jan 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The phylogenetic position of the phylum Ctenophora and the nature of ctenphore nervous systems are highly debated topics in modern evolutionary biology. However, very little is known about the organization of ctenophore neural and muscular systems, and virtually nothing has been reported about their embryogenesis. Here we have characterized the neural and muscular development of the sea gooseberry, Pleurobrachia bachei, starting from the cleavage stages to posthatching larvae. Scanning electron microscopy and immunochemistry were used to describe the formation of the embryonic mouth, tentacles, combs, aboral organ, and putative sensory cells. The muscles started their specification at the end of the first day of Pleurobrachia development. In contrast, neurons appeared 2 days after myogenesis, just before the hatching of fully formed cydippid larvae. The first tubulin-immunoreactive neurons, a small group of four to six cells with neuronal processes, was initially recognized at the aboral pole during the third day of development. Surprisingly, this observed neurogenesis occurred after the emergence of distinct behavioral patterns in the embryos. Thus, the embryonic behavior associated with comb cilia beatings and initial muscle organization does not require morphologically defined neurons and their elongated neurites. This study provides the first description of neuromuscular development in the enigmatic ctenophores and establishes the foundation for future research using emerging genomic tools and resources.