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Mouse Anti-Drosophila fasciclin III Monoclonal Antibody, Unconjugated

RRID:AB_528238

Antibody ID

AB_528238

Target Antigen

Mouse Drosophila fasciclin III drosophila/arthropod, drosophila

Proper Citation

(DSHB Cat# 7G10 anti-Fasciclin III, RRID:AB_528238)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Comments

manufacturer recommendations: IgG2a no

Host Organism

mouse

Vendor

DSHB Go To Vendor

Atf3 links loss of epithelial polarity to defects in cell differentiation and cytoarchitecture.

  • Donohoe CD
  • PLoS Genet.
  • 2018 Jul 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Interplay between apicobasal cell polarity modules and the cytoskeleton is critical for differentiation and integrity of epithelia. However, this coordination is poorly understood at the level of gene regulation by transcription factors. Here, we establish the Drosophila activating transcription factor 3 (atf3) as a cell polarity response gene acting downstream of the membrane-associated Scribble polarity complex. Loss of the tumor suppressors Scribble or Dlg1 induces atf3 expression via aPKC but independent of Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Strikingly, removal of Atf3 from Dlg1 deficient cells restores polarized cytoarchitecture, levels and distribution of endosomal trafficking machinery, and differentiation. Conversely, excess Atf3 alters microtubule network, vesicular trafficking and the partition of polarity proteins along the apicobasal axis. Genomic and genetic approaches implicate Atf3 as a regulator of cytoskeleton organization and function, and identify Lamin C as one of its bona fide target genes. By affecting structural features and cell morphology, Atf3 functions in a manner distinct from other transcription factors operating downstream of disrupted cell polarity.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM057070(United States)

Coordination of Septate Junctions Assembly and Completion of Cytokinesis in Proliferative Epithelial Tissues.

  • Daniel E
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2018 May 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

How permeability barrier function is maintained when epithelial cells divide is largely unknown. Here, we have investigated how the bicellular septate junctions (BSJs) and tricellular septate junctions (TSJs) are remodeled throughout completion of cytokinesis in Drosophila epithelia. We report that, following cytokinetic ring constriction, the midbody assembles, matures within SJs, and is displaced basally in two phases. In a first slow phase, the neighboring cells remain connected to the dividing cells by means of SJ-containing membrane protrusions pointing to the maturing midbody. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that SJs within the membrane protrusions correspond to the old SJs that were present prior to cytokinesis. In contrast, new SJs are assembled below the adherens junctions and spread basally to build a new belt of SJs in a manner analogous to a conveyor belt. Loss of function of a core BSJ component, the Na+/K+-ATPase pump Nervana 2 subunit, revealed that the apical-to-basal spread of BSJs drives the basal displacement of the midbody. In contrast, loss of the TSJ protein Bark beetle indicated that remodeling of TSJs is rate limiting and slowed down midbody migration. In the second phase, once the belt of SJs is assembled, the basal displacement of the midbody is accelerated and ultimately leads to abscission. This last step is temporally uncoupled from the remodeling of SJs. We propose that cytokinesis in epithelia involves the coordinated polarized assembly and remodeling of SJs both in the dividing cell and its neighbors to ensure the maintenance of permeability barrier integrity in proliferative epithelia.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA92160(United States)

The InR/Akt/TORC1 Growth-Promoting Signaling Negatively Regulates JAK/STAT Activity and Migratory Cell Fate during Morphogenesis.

  • Kang D
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cell growth and cell differentiation are two distinct yet coupled developmental processes, but how they are coordinated is not well understood. During Drosophila oogenesis, we found that the growth-promoting InR/Akt/TOR pathway was involved in suppressing the fate determination of the migratory border cells. The InR/Akt/TOR pathway signals through TOR and Raptor, components of TORC1, to downregulate the JAK/STAT pathway, which is necessary and sufficient for border cell fate determination. TORC1 promotes the protein stability of SOCS36E, the conserved negative regulator of JAK/STAT signaling, through physical interaction, suggesting that TORC1 acts as a key regulator coordinating both cell growth and cell differentiation.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - (Canada)

The WAVE Regulatory Complex and Branched F-Actin Counterbalance Contractile Force to Control Cell Shape and Packing in the Drosophila Eye.

  • Del Signore SJ
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Contractile forces eliminate cell contacts in many morphogenetic processes. However, mechanisms that balance contractile forces to promote subtler remodeling remain unknown. To address this gap, we investigated remodeling of Drosophila eye lattice cells (LCs), which preserve cell contacts as they narrow to form the edges of a multicellular hexagonal lattice. We found that during narrowing, LC-LC contacts dynamically constrict and expand. Similar to other systems, actomyosin-based contractile forces promote pulses of constriction. Conversely, we found that WAVE-dependent branched F-actin accumulates at LC-LC contacts during expansion and functions to expand the cell apical area, promote shape changes, and prevent elimination of LC-LC contacts. Finally, we found that small Rho GTPases regulate the balance of contractile and protrusive dynamics. These data suggest a mechanism by which WAVE regulatory complex-based F-actin dynamics antagonize contractile forces to regulate cell shape and tissue topology during remodeling and thus contribute to the robustness and precision of the process.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI058279-05(United States)

Tissue-specific regulation of BMP signaling by Drosophila N-glycanase 1.

  • Galeone A
  • Elife
  • 2017 Aug 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mutations in the human N-glycanase 1 (NGLY1) cause a rare, multisystem congenital disorder with global developmental delay. However, the mechanisms by which NGLY1 and its homologs regulate embryonic development are not known. Here we show that Drosophila Pngl encodes an N-glycanase and exhibits a high degree of functional conservation with human NGLY1. Loss of Pngl results in developmental midgut defects reminiscent of midgut-specific loss of BMP signaling. Pngl mutant larvae also exhibit a severe midgut clearance defect, which cannot be fully explained by impaired BMP signaling. Genetic experiments indicate that Pngl is primarily required in the mesoderm during Drosophila development. Loss of Pngl results in a severe decrease in the level of Dpp homodimers and abolishes BMP autoregulation in the visceral mesoderm mediated by Dpp and Tkv homodimers. Thus, our studies uncover a novel mechanism for the tissue-specific regulation of an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway by an N-glycanase enzyme.

Meru couples planar cell polarity with apical-basal polarity during asymmetric cell division.

  • Banerjee JJ
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jun 30

Literature context:


Abstract:

Polarity is a shared feature of most cells. In epithelia, apical-basal polarity often coexists, and sometimes intersects with planar cell polarity (PCP), which orients cells in the epithelial plane. From a limited set of core building blocks (e.g. the Par complexes for apical-basal polarity and the Frizzled/Dishevelled complex for PCP), a diverse array of polarized cells and tissues are generated. This suggests the existence of little-studied tissue-specific factors that rewire the core polarity modules to the appropriate conformation. In Drosophila sensory organ precursors (SOPs), the core PCP components initiate the planar polarization of apical-basal determinants, ensuring asymmetric division into daughter cells of different fates. We show that Meru, a RASSF9/RASSF10 homologue, is expressed specifically in SOPs, recruited to the posterior cortex by Frizzled/Dishevelled, and in turn polarizes the apical-basal polarity factor Bazooka (Par3). Thus, Meru belongs to a class of proteins that act cell/tissue-specifically to remodel the core polarity machinery.

Mapping chromatic pathways in the Drosophila visual system.

  • Lin TY
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2016 Feb 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

In Drosophila, color vision and wavelength-selective behaviors are mediated by the compound eye's narrow-spectrum photoreceptors R7 and R8 and their downstream medulla projection (Tm) neurons Tm5a, Tm5b, Tm5c, and Tm20 in the second optic neuropil or medulla. These chromatic Tm neurons project axons to a deeper optic neuropil, the lobula, which in insects has been implicated in processing and relaying color information to the central brain. The synaptic targets of the chromatic Tm neurons in the lobula are not known, however. Using a modified GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) method to probe connections between the chromatic Tm neurons and 28 known and novel types of lobula neurons, we identify anatomically the visual projection neurons LT11 and LC14 and the lobula intrinsic neurons Li3 and Li4 as synaptic targets of the chromatic Tm neurons. Single-cell GRASP analyses reveal that Li4 receives synaptic contacts from over 90% of all four types of chromatic Tm neurons, whereas LT11 is postsynaptic to the chromatic Tm neurons, with only modest selectivity and at a lower frequency and density. To visualize synaptic contacts at the ultrastructural level, we develop and apply a "two-tag" double-labeling method to label LT11's dendrites and the mitochondria in Tm5c's presynaptic terminals. Serial electron microscopic reconstruction confirms that LT11 receives direct contacts from Tm5c. This method would be generally applicable to map the connections of large complex neurons in Drosophila and other animals.

Drosophila heat shock response requires the JNK pathway and phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase at a conserved serine-proline motif.

  • Gonda RL
  • PLoS ONE
  • 2012 Jul 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Defining context specific requirements for proteins and pathways is a major challenge in the study of signal transduction. For example, the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathways are comprised of families of closely related transducers that are activated in a variety of tissues and contexts during development and organismal homeostasis. Consequently, redundant and pleiotropic effects have hampered a complete understanding of the individual contributions of transducers in distinct contexts. Here, we report on the function of a context-specific regulatory phosphorylation site, PXSP, in the Drosophila mixed lineage kinase protein, Slpr, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) in the Jun Kinase (JNK) pathway. Genetic analysis of the function of non-phosphorylatable (PXAP) and phosphomimetic mutant (PXEP) Slpr transgenes in several distinct contexts revealed minimal effects in JNK-dependent tissue closure processes but differential requirements in heat stress response. In particular, PXAP expression resulted in sensitivity of adults to sustained heat shock, like p38 and JNK pathway mutants. In contrast, PXEP overexpression conferred some resistance. Indeed, phosphorylation of the PXSP motif is enriched under heat shock conditions and requires in part, the p38 kinases for the enrichment. These data suggest that coordination of signaling between p38 and Slpr serves to maintain JNK signaling during heat stress. In sum, we demonstrate a novel role for JNK signaling in the heat shock response in flies and identify a posttranslational modification on Slpr, at a conserved site among MAP3K mixed lineage kinase family members, which bolsters stress resistance with negligible effects on JNK-dependent developmental processes.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01GM10974(United States)

Phosphorylation of Grainy head by ERK is essential for wound-dependent regeneration but not for development of an epidermal barrier.

  • Kim M
  • Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • 2011 Jan 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Grainy head (GRH) is a key transcription factor responsible for epidermal barrier formation and repair, whose function is highly conserved across diverse animal species. However, it is not known how GRH function is reactivated to repair differentiated epidermal barriers after wounding. Here, we show that GRH is directly regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, which is required for wound-dependent expression of GRH target genes in epidermal cells. Serine 91 is the principal residue in GRH that is phosphorylated by ERK. Although mutations of the ERK phosphorylation sites in GRH do not impair its DNA binding function, the ERK sites in GRH are required to activate Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) and misshapen (msn) epidermal wound enhancers as well as functional regeneration of an epidermal barrier upon wounding. This result indicates that the phosphorylation sites are essential for damaged epidermal barrier repair. However, GRH with mutant ERK phosphorylation sites can still promote barrier formation during embryonic epidermal development, suggesting that ERK sites are dispensable for the GRH function in establishing epidermal barrier integrity. These results provide mechanistic insight into how tissue repair can be initiated by posttranslational modification of a key transcription factor that normally mediates the developmental generation of that tissue.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - R01 HG005238(United States)

Morphological and functional characterization of the thoracic portion of blowfly salivary glands.

  • Rotte C
  • Arthropod Struct Dev
  • 2008 Sep 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

The abdominal portion of the salivary glands in the blowfly has been studied intensively. Here, we examine the thoracic part of the salivary glands, emphasizing structural and functional aspects. The initial segment downstream of the abdominal portion is secretory and resembles the latter in most structural and functional aspects: the apical membrane is enfolded, forms a canalicular system and contains V-H(+)-ATPase that assembles upon stimulation with the hormone serotonin (5-HT); Na,K-ATPase is localized in the basolateral membrane; septate junctions are not prominent, as deduced from immunofluorescence staining for the marker proteins discs large and fasciclin III. 5-HT elicits, at low concentrations, cytoplasmic [Ca2+] oscillations, and, at saturating concentrations, a tonic [Ca2+] rise. The following, so-called "re-absorptive" segment loops through the coiled secretory portion of the salivary gland. The apical membrane of the re-absorptive cells is not enfolded, and septate junctions are prominent. V-H(+)-ATPase and Na,K-ATPase reside on the apical and basolateral membranes, respectively. Finally, re-absorptive cells are also sensitive to 5-HT; however, whereas V-ATPase assembly has a 5-HT concentration dependence similar to other segments, the Ca2+ response occurs only at higher 5-HT concentrations, and displays a different kinetic pattern.

Multipotent somatic stem cells contribute to the stem cell niche in the Drosophila testis.

  • Voog J
  • Nature
  • 2008 Aug 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Adult stem cells reside in specialized microenvironments, or niches, that have an important role in regulating stem cell behaviour. Therefore, tight control of niche number, size and function is necessary to ensure the proper balance between stem cells and progenitor cells available for tissue homeostasis and wound repair. The stem cell niche in the Drosophila male gonad is located at the tip of the testis where germline and somatic stem cells surround the apical hub, a cluster of approximately 10-15 somatic cells that is required for stem cell self-renewal and maintenance. Here we show that somatic stem cells in the Drosophila testis contribute to both the apical hub and the somatic cyst cell lineage. The Drosophila orthologue of epithelial cadherin (DE-cadherin) is required for somatic stem cell maintenance and, consequently, the apical hub. Furthermore, our data indicate that the transcriptional repressor escargot regulates the ability of somatic cells to assume and/or maintain hub cell identity. These data highlight the dynamic relationship between stem cells and the niche and provide insight into genetic programmes that regulate niche size and function to support normal tissue homeostasis and organ regeneration throughout life.

An unconventional myosin in Drosophila reverses the default handedness in visceral organs.

  • Hozumi S
  • Nature
  • 2006 Apr 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

The internal organs of animals often have left-right asymmetry. Although the formation of the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes in Drosophila is well understood, left-right asymmetry has not been extensively studied. Here we find that the handedness of the embryonic gut and the adult gut and testes is reversed (not randomized) in viable and fertile homozygous Myo31DF mutants. Myo31DF encodes an unconventional myosin, Drosophila MyoIA (also referred to as MyoID in mammals; refs 3, 4), and is the first actin-based motor protein to be implicated in left-right patterning. We find that Myo31DF is required in the hindgut epithelium for normal embryonic handedness. Disruption of actin filaments in the hindgut epithelium randomizes the handedness of the embryonic gut, suggesting that Myo31DF function requires the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, we find that Myo31DF colocalizes with the cytoskeleton. Overexpression of Myo61F, another myosin I (ref. 4), reverses the handedness of the embryonic gut, and its knockdown also causes a left-right patterning defect. These two unconventional myosin I proteins may have antagonistic functions in left-right patterning. We suggest that the actin cytoskeleton and myosin I proteins may be crucial for generating left-right asymmetry in invertebrates.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC00739(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - 1R01 GM085022(United States)

Jeb signals through the Alk receptor tyrosine kinase to drive visceral muscle fusion.

  • Englund C
  • Nature
  • 2003 Oct 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

The Drosophila melanogaster gene Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) is homologous to mammalian Alk, a member of the Alk/Ltk family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). We have previously shown that the Drosophila Alk RTK is crucial for visceral mesoderm development during early embryogenesis. Notably, observed Alk visceral mesoderm defects are highly reminiscent of the phenotype reported for the secreted molecule Jelly belly (Jeb). Here we show that Drosophila Alk is the receptor for Jeb in the developing visceral mesoderm, and that Jeb binding stimulates an Alk-driven, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-mediated signalling pathway, which results in the expression of the downstream gene duf (also known as kirre)--needed for muscle fusion. This new signal transduction pathway drives specification of the muscle founder cells, and the regulation of Duf expression by the Drosophila Alk RTK explains the visceral-mesoderm-specific muscle fusion defects observed in both Alk and jeb mutant animals.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - T32 HD055164(United States)

A crucial role for the Anaplastic lymphoma kinase receptor tyrosine kinase in gut development in Drosophila melanogaster.

  • Lorén CE
  • EMBO Rep.
  • 2003 Aug 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

The Drosophila melanogaster gene Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) is homologous to mammalian Alk, which encodes a member of the Alk/Ltk family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In humans, the t(2;5) translocation, which involves the ALK locus, produces an active form of ALK, which is the causative agent in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The physiological function of the Alk RTK, however, is unknown. In this paper, we describe loss-of-function mutants in the Drosophila Alk gene that cause a complete failure of the development of the gut. We propose that the main function of Drosophila Alk during early embryogenesis is in visceral mesoderm development.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R56 MH081152(United States)

DE-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is essential for maintaining somatic stem cells in the Drosophila ovary.

  • Song X
  • Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • 2002 Nov 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

Evidence from many systems has shown that stem cells are maintained in "niches" or specific regulatory microenvironments formed by stromal cells. The question of how stem cells are maintained in their niches is important, and further studies will lead to a better understanding of stem cell regulation and enhance the future use of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Here we show that cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is required for anchoring somatic stem cells (SSCs) to their niches in the Drosophila ovary. DE-cadherin and Armadillo/beta-catenin accumulate in the junctions between SSCs and their neighboring cells, inner germarial sheath cells. Removal of DE-cadherin from SSCs results in stem cell loss in the adult ovary. Furthermore, the cadherin-mediated adhesion is also important for maintaining SSCs in their niches before adulthood. This study provides further support that SSCs are located in a niche formed by their neighboring cells. We have previously shown that DE-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is essential for anchoring germ-line stem cells to their niches in the Drosophila ovary. This study further implicates cadherin-mediated cell adhesion as a general mechanism for anchoring stem cells to their niches in a variety of systems.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - U54 CA193419(United States)

Posterior midgut epithelial cells differ in their organization of the membrane skeleton from other drosophila epithelia.

  • Baumann O
  • Exp. Cell Res.
  • 2001 Nov 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

In epithelial cells, the various components of the membrane skeleton are segregated within specialized subregions of the plasma membrane, thus contributing to the development and stabilization of cell surface polarity. It has previously been shown that, in various Drosophila epithelia, the membrane skeleton components ankyrin and alphabeta-spectrin reside at the lateral surface, whereas alphabeta(H)-spectrin is restricted to the apical domain. By use of confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the present study characterizes the membrane skeleton of epithelial cells in the posterior midgut, leading to a number of unexpected results. First, ankyrin and alphabeta-spectrin are not detected on the entire lateral surface but appear to be restricted to the apicolateral area, codistributing with fasciclin III at smooth septate junctions. The presumptive ankyrin-binding proteins neuroglian and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, however, do not colocalize with ankyrin. Second, alphabeta(H)-spectrin is enriched at the apical domain but is also present in lower amounts on the entire lateral surface, colocalizing apicolaterally with ankyrin/alphabeta-spectrin. Finally, despite the absence of zonulae adherentes, F-actin, beta(H)-spectrin, and nonmuscle myosin-II are enriched in the midlateral region. Thus, the model established for the organization of the membrane skeleton in Drosophila epithelia does not hold for the posterior midgut, and there is quite some variability between the different epithelia with respect to the organization of the membrane skeleton.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01-EY14202(United States)

Wingless and Hedgehog pattern Drosophila denticle belts by regulating the production of short-range signals.

  • Alexandre C
  • Development
  • 1999 Dec 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

The secreted proteins Wingless and Hedgehog are essential to the elaboration of the denticle pattern in the epidermis of Drosophila embryos. We show that signaling by Wingless and Hedgehog regulates the expression of veinlet (rhomboid) and Serrate, two genes expressed in prospective denticle belts. Thus, Serrate and veinlet (rhom) partake in the last layer of the segmentation cascade. Ultimately, Wingless, Hedgehog, Veinlet (an indirect activator of the Egfr) and Serrate (an activator of Notch) are expressed in non-overlapping narrow stripes. The interface between any two stripes allows a reliable prediction of individual denticle types and polarity suggesting that contact-dependent signaling modulates individual cell fates. Attributes of a morphogen can be ascribed to Hedgehog in this system. However, no single morphogen organises the whole denticle pattern.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - R01RR025030(United States)

Commissureless endocytosis is correlated with initiation of neuromuscular synaptogenesis.

  • Wolf B
  • Development
  • 1998 Oct 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

We show that the Commissureless (COMM) transmembrane protein is required at neuromuscular synaptogenesis. All muscles in the Drosophila embryo express COMM during the period of motoneuron-muscle interaction. It is endocytosed into muscles before synaptogenesis. In comm loss-of-function mutants, motoneuron growth cones fail to initiate synaptogenesis at target muscles. This stall phenotype is rescued by supplying wild-type COMM to the muscles. Cytoplasmically truncated COMM protein fails to internalize. Expressing this mutant protein in muscles phenocopies the synaptogenesis defects of comm mutants. Thus, synaptogenesis initiation is positively correlated with endocytosis of COMM in postsynaptic muscle cells. We propose that COMM is an essential part of the dynamic cell surface remodeling needed by postsynaptic cells in coordinating synaptogenesis initiation.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - U54CA143803(United States)

Drosophila oocyte localization is mediated by differential cadherin-based adhesion.

  • Godt D
  • Nature
  • 1998 Sep 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

In a Drosophila follicle the oocyte always occupies a posterior position among a group of sixteen germline cells. Although the importance of this cell arrangement for the subsequent formation of the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo is well documented, the molecular mechanism responsible for the posterior localization of the oocyte was unknown. Here we show that the homophilic adhesion molecule DE-cadherin mediates oocyte positioning. During follicle biogenesis, DE-cadherin is expressed in germline (including oocyte) and surrounding follicle cells, with the highest concentration of DE-cadherin being found at the interface between oocyte and posterior follicle cells. Mosaic analysis shows that DE-cadherin is required in both germline and follicle cells for correct oocyte localization, indicating that germline-soma interactions may be involved in this process. By analysing the behaviour of the oocyte in follicles with a chimaeric follicular epithelium, we find that the position of the oocyte is determined by the position of DE-cadherin-expressing follicle cells, to which the oocyte attaches itself selectively. Among the DE-cadherin positive follicle cells, the oocyte preferentially contacts those cells that express higher levels of DE-cadherin. On the basis of these data, we propose that in wild-type follicles the oocyte competes successfully with its sister germline cells for contact to the posterior follicle cells, a sorting process driven by different concentrations of DE-cadherin. This is, to our knowledge, the first in vivo example of a cell-sorting process that depends on differential adhesion mediated by a cadherin.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - 77764(Canada)
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - HL53319(United States)

Homophilic synaptic target recognition mediated by immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin III.

  • Kose H
  • Development
  • 1997 Oct 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin III (FAS3) mediates synaptic target recognition through homophilic interaction. FAS3 is expressed by the RP3 motoneuron and its target muscles during synaptic target recognition. The RP3 growth cone can form synapses on muscles that ectopically express FAS3. This mistargeting is dependent on FAS3 expression in the motoneurons. In addition, when the FAS3-negative aCC and SNa motoneuron growth cones ectopically express FAS3, they gain the ability to recognize FAS3-expressing muscles as alternative targets. We propose that homophilic synaptic target recognition serves as a basic mechanism of neural network formation.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01DK069514(United States)

The cell surface metalloprotease/disintegrin Kuzbanian is required for axonal extension in Drosophila.

  • Fambrough D
  • Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • 1996 Nov 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

It has long been suspected that proteolytic activity associated with advancing growth cones may be required for axon extension. We have isolated mutations in the kuzbanian (kuz) gene, which is expressed in the nervous system and encodes a putative zinc metalloprotease with a disintegrin domain. Drosophila embryos with loss-of-function mutations in kuz have dramatic defects in the development of central nervous system axon pathways, with many axons stalling and failing to extend through the nerve cord. This phenotype is rescued by panneural expression of kuz mRNA in the embryo. These results show that the Kuz metalloprotease is required for axon extension, suggesting a requirement for proteolytic activity at the growth cone surface.

Funding information:
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - ES 11267(United States)

The germ line regulates somatic cyst cell proliferation and fate during Drosophila spermatogenesis.

  • Gönczy P
  • Development
  • 1996 Aug 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Spermatogenesis relies on the function of germ-line stem cells, as a continuous supply of differentiated spermatids is produced throughout life. In Drosophila, there must also be somatic stem cells that produce the cyst cells that accompany germ cells throughout spermatogenesis. By lineage tracing, we demonstrate the existence of such somatic stem cells and confirm that of germ-line stem cells. The somatic stem cells likely correspond to the ultrastructurally described cyst progenitor cells. The stem cells for both the germ-line and cyst lineage are anchored around the hub of non-dividing somatic cells located at the testis tip. We then address whether germ cells regulate the behavior of somatic hub cells, cyst progenitors and their daughter cyst cells by analyzing cell proliferation and fate in testes in which the germ line has been genetically ablated. Daughter cyst cells, which normally withdraw from the cell cycle, continue to proliferate in the absence of germ cells. In addition, cells from the cyst lineage switch to the hub cell fate. Male-sterile alleles of chickadee and diaphanous, which are deficient in germ cells, exhibit similar cyst cell phenotypes. We conclude that signaling from germ cells regulates the proliferation and fate of cells in the somatic cyst lineage.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS26084(United States)
  • NLM NIH HHS - LM05799(United States)

Receptor tyrosine phosphatases are required for motor axon guidance in the Drosophila embryo.

  • Desai CJ
  • Cell
  • 1996 Feb 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

The receptor tyrosine phosphatases DPTP69D and DPTP99A are expressed on motor axons in Drosophila embryos. In mutant embryos lacking DPTP69D protein, motor neuron growth cones stop growing before reaching their muscle targets, or follow incorrect pathways that bypass these muscles. Mutant embryos lacking DPTP99A are indistinguishable from wild type. Motor axon defects in dptp69D dptp99A double mutant embryos, however, are much more severe than in embryos lacking only DPTP69D. Our results demonstrate that DPTP69D and DPTP99A are required for motor axon guidance and that they have partially redundant functions during development of the neuro-muscular system.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA-85129(United States)

Characterization and cloning of fasciclin III: a glycoprotein expressed on a subset of neurons and axon pathways in Drosophila.

  • Patel NH
  • Cell
  • 1987 Mar 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

To identify candidates for neuronal recognition molecules in Drosophila, we used monoclonal antibodies to search for surface glycoproteins expressed on subsets of axon bundles (or fascicles) during development. Here we report on the characterization and cloning of fasciclin III, which is expressed on a subset of neurons and axon pathways in the Drosophila embryo. Fasciclin III is also expressed at other times and places including transient segmentally repeated patches in the neuroepithelium and segmentally repeated stripes in the body epidermis. Antisera generated against each of four highly related forms of the protein were used for cDNA expression cloning to identify a single gene, which was confirmed to encode fasciclin III by tissue in situ hybridization and genetic deficiency analysis.

Funding information:
  • PHS HHS - P01 A53996(United States)