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GFP antibody

RRID:AB_305564

Antibody ID

AB_305564

Target Antigen

GFP antibody

Proper Citation

(Abcam Cat# ab6556, RRID:AB_305564)

Clonality

polyclonal antibody

Comments

validation status unknown, seller recommendations provided in 2012: Immunohistochemistry - frozen; Immunoprecipitation; Immunohistochemistry - fixed; Immunofluorescence; Immunohistochemistry; Electron Microscopy; Immunocytochemistry; Flow Cytometry; Western Blot; EM, Flow Cyt, ICC/IF, IHC-FoFr, IHC-Fr, IHC-P, IP, WB

Host Organism

rabbit

Vendor

Abcam

CAST/ELKS Proteins Control Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel Density and Synaptic Release Probability at a Mammalian Central Synapse.

  • Dong W
  • Cell Rep
  • 2018 Jul 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the presynaptic terminal, the magnitude and location of Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) regulate the efficacy of neurotransmitter release. However, how presynaptic active zone proteins control mammalian VGCC levels and organization is unclear. To address this, we deleted the CAST/ELKS protein family at the calyx of Held, a CaV2.1 channel-exclusive presynaptic terminal. We found that loss of CAST/ELKS reduces the CaV2.1 current density with concomitant reductions in CaV2.1 channel numbers and clusters. Surprisingly, deletion of CAST/ELKS increases release probability while decreasing the readily releasable pool, with no change in active zone ultrastructure. In addition, Ca2+ channel coupling is unchanged, but spontaneous release rates are elevated. Thus, our data identify distinct roles for CAST/ELKS as positive regulators of CaV2.1 channel density and suggest that they regulate release probability through a post-priming step that controls synaptic vesicle fusogenicity.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA093372(United States)

Cerebellar learning properties are modulated by the CRF receptor in granular cells.

  • Ezra-Nevo G
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jun 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1) play an important role in the responses to stressful challenges. Despite the well-established expression of CRFR1 in granular cells (GrCs), its role in procedural motor performance and memory formation remains elusive. To investigate the role of CRFR1 expression in cerebellar GrCs, we used a mouse model depleted of CRFR1 in these cells. We detected changes in the cellular learning mechanisms in GrCs depleted of CRFR1 in that they showed changes in intrinsic excitability and long-term synaptic plasticity. Moreover, male mice depleted of CRFR1 specifically in GrCs showed accelerated Pavlovian associative eye-blink conditioning, but no differences in baseline motor performance, locomotion or fear and anxiety-related behaviors. Last, we analyzed cerebella transcriptome of KO and control mice and detected prominent alterations in the expression of calcium signaling pathways components. Our findings shed light on the interplay between stress-related central mechanisms and cerebellar motor conditioning, highlighting the role of the CRF system in regulating particular forms of cerebellar learning.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTAlthough it is known that CRFR1 is highly expressed in the cerebellum, little attention has been given to its role in cerebellar functions in the behaving animal. Moreover, most of the attention was directed to the effect of CRF on Purkinje cells at the cellular level, and to this date, almost no data exist on the role of this stress-related receptor in other cerebellar structures. Here, we explored the behavioral and cellular effect of GrCs specific ablation of CRFR1 We found a profound effect on learning, both at the cellular and behavioral levels, without affecting baseline motor skills.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - U01 CA105490(United States)

Neuronal calcineurin transcriptional targets parallel changes observed in Alzheimer disease brain.

  • Hopp SC
  • J. Neurochem.
  • 2018 May 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Synaptic dysfunction and loss are core pathological features in Alzheimer disease (AD). In the vicinity of amyloid-β plaques in animal models, synaptic toxicity occurs and is associated with chronic activation of the phosphatase calcineurin (CN). Indeed, pharmacological inhibition of CN blocks amyloid-β synaptotoxicity. We therefore hypothesized that CN-mediated transcriptional changes may contribute to AD neuropathology and tested this by examining the impact of CN overexpression on neuronal gene expression in vivo. We found dramatic transcriptional downregulation, especially of synaptic mRNAs, in neurons chronically exposed to CN activation. Importantly, the transcriptional profile parallels the changes in human AD tissue. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that both nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and numerous microRNAs may all be impacted by CN, and parallel findings are observed in AD. These data and analyses support the hypothesis that at least part of the synaptic failure characterizing AD may result from aberrant CN activation leading to downregulation of synaptic genes, potentially via activation of specific transcription factors and expression of repressive microRNAs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - 1R01GM-CA65494-01A1(United States)

Synergy between the KEAP1/NRF2 and PI3K Pathways Drives Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with an Altered Immune Microenvironment.

  • Best SA
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Apr 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

The lung presents a highly oxidative environment, which is tolerated through engagement of tightly controlled stress response pathways. A critical stress response mediator is the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2/NRF2), which is negatively regulated by Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1). Alterations in the KEAP1/NRF2 pathway have been identified in 23% of lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting that deregulation of the pathway is a major cancer driver. We demonstrate that inactivation of Keap1 and Pten in the mouse lung promotes adenocarcinoma formation. Notably, metabolites identified in the plasma of Keap1f/f/Ptenf/f tumor-bearing mice indicate that tumorigenesis is associated with reprogramming of the pentose phosphate pathway. Furthermore, the immune milieu was dramatically changed by Keap1 and Pten deletion, and tumor regression was achieved utilizing immune checkpoint inhibition. Thus, our study highlights the ability to exploit both metabolic and immune characteristics in the detection and treatment of lung tumors harboring KEAP1/NRF2 pathway alterations.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - U54 HG004592(United States)

Axon-Axon Interactions Regulate Topographic Optic Tract Sorting via CYFIP2-Dependent WAVE Complex Function.

  • Cioni JM
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Mar 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

The axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are topographically sorted before they arrive at the optic tectum. This pre-target sorting, typical of axon tracts throughout the brain, is poorly understood. Here, we show that cytoplasmic FMR1-interacting proteins (CYFIPs) fulfill non-redundant functions in RGCs, with CYFIP1 mediating axon growth and CYFIP2 specifically involved in axon sorting. We find that CYFIP2 mediates homotypic and heterotypic contact-triggered fasciculation and repulsion responses between dorsal and ventral axons. CYFIP2 associates with transporting ribonucleoprotein particles in axons and regulates translation. Axon-axon contact stimulates CYFIP2 to move into growth cones where it joins the actin nucleating WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) in the periphery and regulates actin remodeling and filopodial dynamics. CYFIP2's function in axon sorting is mediated by its binding to the WRC but not its translational regulation. Together, these findings uncover CYFIP2 as a key regulatory link between axon-axon interactions, filopodial dynamics, and optic tract sorting.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R01 HD032067(United States)

Caldendrin Directly Couples Postsynaptic Calcium Signals to Actin Remodeling in Dendritic Spines.

  • Mikhaylova M
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Mar 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

Compartmentalization of calcium-dependent plasticity allows for rapid actin remodeling in dendritic spines. However, molecular mechanisms for the spatio-temporal regulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics by spinous Ca2+-transients are still poorly defined. We show that the postsynaptic Ca2+ sensor caldendrin orchestrates nano-domain actin dynamics that are essential for actin remodeling in the early phase of long-term potentiation (LTP). Steep elevation in spinous [Ca2+]i disrupts an intramolecular interaction of caldendrin and allows cortactin binding. The fast on and slow off rate of this interaction keeps cortactin in an active conformation, and protects F-actin at the spine base against cofilin-induced severing. Caldendrin gene knockout results in higher synaptic actin turnover, altered nanoscale organization of spinous F-actin, defects in structural spine plasticity, LTP, and hippocampus-dependent learning. Collectively, the data indicate that caldendrin-cortactin directly couple [Ca2+]i to preserve a minimal F-actin pool that is required for actin remodeling in the early phase of LTP.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - HG004968(United States)

Insm1 Induces Neural Progenitor Delamination in Developing Neocortex via Downregulation of the Adherens Junction Belt-Specific Protein Plekha7.

  • Tavano S
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Mar 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Delamination of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from the ventricular surface is a crucial prerequisite to form the subventricular zone, the germinal layer linked to the expansion of the mammalian neocortex in development and evolution. Here, we dissect the molecular mechanism by which the transcription factor Insm1 promotes the generation of basal progenitors (BPs). Insm1 protein is most highly expressed in newborn BPs in mouse and human developing neocortex. Forced Insm1 expression in embryonic mouse neocortex causes NPC delamination, converting apical to basal radial glia. Insm1 represses the expression of the apical adherens junction belt-specific protein Plekha7. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of Plekha7 expression suffices to cause NPC delamination. Plekha7 overexpression impedes the intrinsic and counteracts the Insm1-induced, NPC delamination. Our findings uncover a novel molecular mechanism underlying NPC delamination in which a BP-genic transcription factor specifically targets the integrity of the apical adherens junction belt, rather than adherens junction components as such.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA BC010763-05(United States)

Myosin VI-Dependent Actin Cages Encapsulate Parkin-Positive Damaged Mitochondria.

  • Kruppa AJ
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mitochondrial quality control is essential to maintain cellular homeostasis and is achieved by removing damaged, ubiquitinated mitochondria via Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Here, we demonstrate that MYO6 (myosin VI), a unique myosin that moves toward the minus end of actin filaments, forms a complex with Parkin and is selectively recruited to damaged mitochondria via its ubiquitin-binding domain. This myosin motor initiates the assembly of F-actin cages to encapsulate damaged mitochondria by forming a physical barrier that prevents refusion with neighboring populations. Loss of MYO6 results in an accumulation of mitophagosomes and an increase in mitochondrial mass. In addition, we observe downstream mitochondrial dysfunction manifesting as reduced respiratory capacity and decreased ability to rely on oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. Our work uncovers a crucial step in mitochondrial quality control: the formation of MYO6-dependent actin cages that ensure isolation of damaged mitochondria from the network.

Funding information:
  • CIHR - 232519(Canada)

Endosomal Rab cycles regulate Parkin-mediated mitophagy.

  • Yamano K
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jan 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Damaged mitochondria are selectively eliminated by mitophagy. Parkin and PINK1, gene products mutated in familial Parkinson's disease, play essential roles in mitophagy through ubiquitination of mitochondria. Cargo ubiquitination by E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin is important to trigger selective autophagy. Although autophagy receptors recruit LC3-labeled autophagic membranes onto damaged mitochondria, how other essential autophagy units such as ATG9A-integrated vesicles are recruited remains unclear. Here, using mammalian cultured cells, we demonstrate that RABGEF1, the upstream factor of the endosomal Rab GTPase cascade, is recruited to damaged mitochondria via ubiquitin binding downstream of Parkin. RABGEF1 directs the downstream Rab proteins, RAB5 and RAB7A, to damaged mitochondria, whose associations are further regulated by mitochondrial Rab-GAPs. Furthermore, depletion of RAB7A inhibited ATG9A vesicle assembly and subsequent encapsulation of the mitochondria by autophagic membranes. These results strongly suggest that endosomal Rab cycles on damaged mitochondria are a crucial regulator of mitophagy through assembling ATG9A vesicles.

Funding information:
  • Japan Science and Technology Agency - JPMJCR13M7(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - 16K15095(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP15H01196(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP16K18545(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP26000014(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP26111729(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP26840033(International)
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - R03 DE018415-02(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - Intramural program(United States)

A Method for the Acute and Rapid Degradation of Endogenous Proteins.

  • Clift D
  • Cell
  • 2017 Dec 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Methods for the targeted disruption of protein function have revolutionized science and greatly expedited the systematic characterization of genes. Two main approaches are currently used to disrupt protein function: DNA knockout and RNA interference, which act at the genome and mRNA level, respectively. A method that directly alters endogenous protein levels is currently not available. Here, we present Trim-Away, a technique to degrade endogenous proteins acutely in mammalian cells without prior modification of the genome or mRNA. Trim-Away harnesses the cellular protein degradation machinery to remove unmodified native proteins within minutes of application. This rapidity minimizes the risk that phenotypes are compensated and that secondary, non-specific defects accumulate over time. Because Trim-Away utilizes antibodies, it can be applied to a wide range of target proteins using off-the-shelf reagents. Trim-Away allows the study of protein function in diverse cell types, including non-dividing primary cells where genome- and RNA-targeting methods are limited.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - P30 DC04657(United States)

Canonical Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Postnatal Mouse Epididymal Development But Does Not Affect Epithelial Cell Differentiation.

  • Kumar M
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Dec 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The epithelial lining of the epididymis establishes an optimal environment in which spermatozoa acquire the ability to fertilize an oocyte. This highly specialized organ develops from a simple embryonic tube known as the Wolffian duct (WD). How the simple columnar epithelium of WD acquires the complex features of the adult epididymal epithelium is currently unclear. During these first few weeks after birth, the epididymal epithelium undergoes major changes and by 5 weeks consists of four different cell types. The main objective of this study was to evaluate potential roles of Wnt signaling during postnatal epididymal development and differentiation. To analyze the activity of Wnt signaling during postnatal development, we evaluated the epididymis of TCFGFP mice, a Wnt reporter mouse model. Wnt signaling activity as indicated by green fluorescent protein expression was detected in the whole epididymis of TCFGFP mice during the first 2 weeks of life but was localized only to the caput region by 5 weeks of age. Using a genetic cell lineage tracing approach, we showed that all four of the epididymal epithelial cell types originated from the simple columnar epithelium of WD. To delineate the functional significance of epithelial Wnt signaling in epididymal development and differentiation, we generated a mouse model in which β-catenin (Ctnnb1) was specifically ablated from the epididymal epithelium upon administration of doxycycline. Genetic suppression of epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibited epididymal development by affecting cell proliferation but had no effect on epithelial cell differentiation.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS041218(United States)

ApoE4 Accelerates Early Seeding of Amyloid Pathology.

  • Liu CC
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Dec 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Accumulation and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain is an initiating step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ε4 allele of apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. Although there is strong evidence showing that apoE4 enhances amyloid pathology, it is not clear what the critical stage(s) is during amyloid development in which apoE4 has the strongest impact. Using apoE inducible mouse models, we show that increased expression of astrocytic apoE4, but not apoE3, during the seeding stage of amyloid development enhanced amyloid deposition and neuritic dystrophy in amyloid model mice. ApoE4, but not apoE3, significantly increased brain Aβ half-life measured by in vivo microdialysis. Furthermore, apoE4 expression increased whereas apoE3 reduced amyloid-related gliosis in the mouse brains. Together, our results demonstrate that apoE4 has the greatest impact on amyloid during the seeding stage, likely by perturbing Aβ clearance and enhancing Aβ aggregation.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA087546(United States)
  • NIA NIH HHS - P50 AG016574()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG027924()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG046205()
  • NIA NIH HHS - RF1 AG051504()
  • NIA NIH HHS - RF1 AG056130()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - P01 NS074969()

OsMAPK3 Phosphorylates OsbHLH002/OsICE1 and Inhibits Its Ubiquitination to Activate OsTPP1 and Enhances Rice Chilling Tolerance.

  • Zhang Z
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Dec 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Improvement of chilling tolerance is a major target in rice breeding. The signaling pathways regulating chilling consist of complex networks, including key transcription factors and their targets. However, it remains largely unknown how transcription factors are activated by chilling stress. Here, we report that the transcription factor OsbHLH002/OsICE1 is phosphorylated by OsMAPK3 under chilling stress. The osbhlh002-1 knockout mutant and antisense transgenic plants showed chilling hypersensitivity, whereas OsbHLH002-overexpressing plants exhibited enhanced chilling tolerance. OsbHLH002 can directly target OsTPP1, which encodes a key enzyme for trehalose biosynthesis. OsMAPK3 interacts with OsbHLH002 to prevent its ubiquitination by the E3 ligase OsHOS1. Under chilling stress, active OsMAPK3 phosphorylates OsbHLH002, leading to accumulation of phospho-OsbHLH002, which promotes OsTPP1 expression and increases trehalose content and resistance to chilling damage. Taken together, these results indicate that OsbHLH002 is phosphorylated by OsMAPK3, which enhances OsbHLH002 activation to its target OsTPP1 during chilling stress.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007198(United States)

An Eya1-Notch axis specifies bipotential epibranchial differentiation in mammalian craniofacial morphogenesis.

  • Zhang H
  • Elife
  • 2017 Nov 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Craniofacial morphogenesis requires proper development of pharyngeal arches and epibranchial placodes. We show that the epibranchial placodes, in addition to giving rise to cranial sensory neurons, generate a novel lineage-related non-neuronal cell population for mouse pharyngeal arch development. Eya1 is essential for the development of epibranchial placodes and proximal pharyngeal arches. We identify an Eya1-Notch regulatory axis that specifies both the neuronal and non-neuronal commitment of the epibranchial placode, where Notch acts downstream of Eya1 and promotes the non-neuronal cell fate. Notch is regulated by the threonine phosphatase activity of Eya1. Eya1 dephosphorylates p-threonine-2122 of the Notch1 intracellular domain (Notch1 ICD), which increases the stability of Notch1 ICD and maintains Notch signaling activity in the non-neuronal epibranchial placodal cells. Our data unveil a more complex differentiation program in epibranchial placodes and an important role for the Eya1-Notch axis in craniofacial morphogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - T32 HL007088(United States)

Force Triggers YAP Nuclear Entry by Regulating Transport across Nuclear Pores.

  • Elosegui-Artola A
  • Cell
  • 2017 Nov 30

Literature context:


Abstract:

YAP is a mechanosensitive transcriptional activator with a critical role in cancer, regeneration, and organ size control. Here, we show that force applied to the nucleus directly drives YAP nuclear translocation by decreasing the mechanical restriction of nuclear pores to molecular transport. Exposure to a stiff environment leads cells to establish a mechanical connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton, allowing forces exerted through focal adhesions to reach the nucleus. Force transmission then leads to nuclear flattening, which stretches nuclear pores, reduces their mechanical resistance to molecular transport, and increases YAP nuclear import. The restriction to transport is further regulated by the mechanical stability of the transported protein, which determines both active nuclear transport of YAP and passive transport of small proteins. Our results unveil a mechanosensing mechanism mediated directly by nuclear pores, demonstrated for YAP but with potential general applicability in transcriptional regulation.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - AI 064481(United States)

A Dual Function for Prickle in Regulating Frizzled Stability during Feedback-Dependent Amplification of Planar Polarity.

  • Warrington SJ
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 Sep 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

The core planar polarity pathway coordinates epithelial cell polarity during animal development, and loss of its activity gives rise to a range of defects, from aberrant morphogenetic cell movements to failure to correctly orient structures, such as hairs and cilia. The core pathway functions via a mechanism involving segregation of its protein components to opposite cells ends, where they form asymmetric intracellular complexes that couple cell-cell polarity. This segregation is a self-organizing process driven by feedback interactions between the core proteins themselves. Despite intense efforts, the molecular pathways underlying feedback have proven difficult to elucidate using conventional genetic approaches. Here we investigate core protein function during planar polarization of the Drosophila wing by combining quantitative measurements of protein dynamics with loss-of-function genetics, mosaic analysis, and temporal control of gene expression. Focusing on the key core protein Frizzled, we show that its stable junctional localization is promoted by the core proteins Strabismus, Dishevelled, Prickle, and Diego. In particular, we show that the stabilizing function of Prickle on Frizzled requires Prickle activity in neighboring cells. Conversely, Prickle in the same cell has a destabilizing effect on Frizzled. This destabilizing activity is dependent on the presence of Dishevelled and blocked in the absence of Dynamin and Rab5 activity, suggesting an endocytic mechanism. Overall, our approach reveals for the first time essential in vivo stabilizing and destabilizing interactions of the core proteins required for self-organization of planar polarity.

Glial overexpression of Dube3a causes seizures and synaptic impairments in Drosophila concomitant with down regulation of the Na+/K+ pump ATPα.

  • Hope KA
  • Neurobiol. Dis.
  • 2017 Sep 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Duplication 15q syndrome (Dup15q) is an autism-associated disorder co-incident with high rates of pediatric epilepsy. Additional copies of the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A are thought to cause Dup15q phenotypes, yet models overexpressing UBE3A in neurons have not recapitulated the epilepsy phenotype. We show that Drosophila endogenously expresses Dube3a (fly UBE3A homolog) in glial cells and neurons, prompting an investigation into the consequences of glial Dube3a overexpression. Here we expand on previous work showing that the Na+/K+ pump ATPα is a direct ubiquitin ligase substrate of Dube3a. A robust seizure-like phenotype was observed in flies overexpressing Dube3a in glial cells, but not neurons. Glial-specific knockdown of ATPα also produced seizure-like behavior, and this phenotype was rescued by simultaneously overexpressing ATPα and Dube3a in glia. Our data provides the basis of a paradigm shift in Dup15q research given that clinical phenotypes have long been assumed to be due to neuronal UBE3A overexpression.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R21 HD091541()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R21 GM118962()
  • NIH HHS - P40 OD018537()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS059902()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS082296()

Drosophila CRY Entrains Clocks in Body Tissues to Light and Maintains Passive Membrane Properties in a Non-clock Body Tissue Independent of Light.

  • Agrawal P
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 Aug 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Circadian (∼24 hr) clocks regulate daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism, and behavior via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. In Drosophila, the blue-light photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) synchronizes these feedback loops to light:dark cycles by binding to and degrading TIMELESS (TIM) protein. CRY also acts independently of TIM in Drosophila to alter potassium channel conductance in arousal neurons after light exposure, and in many animals CRY acts independently of light to repress rhythmic transcription. CRY expression has been characterized in the Drosophila brain and eyes, but not in peripheral clock and non-clock tissues in the body. To investigate CRY expression and function in body tissues, we generated a GFP-tagged-cry transgene that rescues light-induced behavioral phase resetting in cry03 mutant flies and sensitively reports GFP-CRY expression. In bodies, CRY is detected in clock-containing tissues including Malpighian tubules, where it mediates both light-dependent TIM degradation and clock function. In larval salivary glands, which lack clock function but are amenable to electrophysiological recording, CRY prevents membrane input resistance from falling to low levels in a light-independent manner. The ability of CRY to maintain high input resistance in these non-excitable cells also requires the K+ channel subunits Hyperkinetic, Shaker, and ether-a-go-go. These findings for the first time define CRY expression in Drosophila peripheral tissues and reveal that CRY acts together with K+ channels to maintain passive membrane properties in a non-clock-containing peripheral tissue independent of light.

Modeling of axonal endoplasmic reticulum network by spastic paraplegia proteins.

  • Yalçın B
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jul 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Axons contain a smooth tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network that is thought to be continuous with ER throughout the neuron; the mechanisms that form this axonal network are unknown. Mutations affecting reticulon or REEP proteins, with intramembrane hairpin domains that model ER membranes, cause an axon degenerative disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We show that Drosophila axons have a dynamic axonal ER network, which these proteins help to model. Loss of HSP hairpin proteins causes ER sheet expansion, partial loss of ER from distal motor axons, and occasional discontinuities in axonal ER. Ultrastructural analysis reveals an extensive ER network in axons, which shows larger and fewer tubules in larvae that lack reticulon and REEP proteins, consistent with loss of membrane curvature. Therefore HSP hairpin-containing proteins are required for shaping and continuity of axonal ER, thus suggesting roles for ER modeling in axon maintenance and function.

Axon Death Pathways Converge on Axundead to Promote Functional and Structural Axon Disassembly.

  • Neukomm LJ
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Jul 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Axon degeneration is a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease and neural injury. Axotomy activates an intrinsic pro-degenerative axon death signaling cascade involving loss of the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme Nmnat/Nmnat2 in axons, activation of dSarm/Sarm1, and subsequent Sarm-dependent depletion of NAD+. Here we identify Axundead (Axed) as a mediator of axon death. axed mutants suppress axon death in several types of axons for the lifespan of the fly and block the pro-degenerative effects of activated dSarm in vivo. Neurodegeneration induced by loss of the sole fly Nmnat ortholog is also fully blocked by axed, but not dsarm, mutants. Thus, pro-degenerative pathways activated by dSarm signaling or Nmnat elimination ultimately converge on Axed. Remarkably, severed axons morphologically preserved by axon death pathway mutations remain integrated in circuits and able to elicit complex behaviors after stimulation, indicating that blockade of axon death signaling results in long-term functional preservation of axons.

MLKL, the Protein that Mediates Necroptosis, Also Regulates Endosomal Trafficking and Extracellular Vesicle Generation.

  • Yoon S
  • Immunity
  • 2017 Jul 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Activation of the pseudokinase mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) upon its phosphorylation by the protein kinase RIPK3 triggers necroptosis, a form of programmed cell death in which rupture of cellular membranes yields release of intracellular components. We report that MLKL also associated with endosomes and controlled the transport of endocytosed proteins, thereby enhancing degradation of receptors and ligands, modulating their induced signaling and facilitating the generation of extracellular vesicles. This role was exerted on two quantitative grades: a constitutive one independent of RIPK3, and an enhanced one, triggered by RIPK3, where the association of MLKL with the endosomes was enhanced, and it was found to bind endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins and the flotillins and to be excluded, together with them, from cells within vesicles. We suggest that release of phosphorylated MLKL within extracellular vesicles serves as a mechanism for self-restricting the necroptotic activity of this protein.

Autophagy-Dependent Shuttling of TBC1D5 Controls Plasma Membrane Translocation of GLUT1 and Glucose Uptake.

  • Roy S
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Jul 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Autophagy traditionally sustains metabolism in stressed cells by promoting intracellular catabolism and nutrient recycling. Here, we demonstrate that in response to stresses requiring increased glycolytic demand, the core autophagy machinery also facilitates glucose uptake and glycolytic flux by promoting cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1/Slc2a1. During metabolic stress, LC3+ autophagic compartments bind and sequester the RabGAP protein TBC1D5 away from its inhibitory interactions with the retromer complex, thereby enabling retromer recruitment to endosome membranes and GLUT1 plasma membrane translocation. In contrast, TBC1D5 inhibitory interactions with the retromer are maintained in autophagy-deficient cells, leading to GLUT1 mis-sorting into endolysosomal compartments. Furthermore, TBC1D5 depletion in autophagy-deficient cells rescues retromer recruitment to endosomal membranes and GLUT1 surface recycling. Hence, TBC1D5 shuttling to autophagosomes during metabolic stress facilitates retromer-dependent GLUT1 trafficking. Overall, our results illuminate key interconnections between the autophagy and endosomal pathways dictating GLUT1 trafficking and extracellular nutrient uptake.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA126792()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA172845()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R21 CA201849()

Cryo-EM Reveals How Human Cytoplasmic Dynein Is Auto-inhibited and Activated.

  • Zhang K
  • Cell
  • 2017 Jun 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cytoplasmic dynein-1 binds dynactin and cargo adaptor proteins to form a transport machine capable of long-distance processive movement along microtubules. However, it is unclear why dynein-1 moves poorly on its own or how it is activated by dynactin. Here, we present a cryoelectron microscopy structure of the complete 1.4-megadalton human dynein-1 complex in an inhibited state known as the phi-particle. We reveal the 3D structure of the cargo binding dynein tail and show how self-dimerization of the motor domains locks them in a conformation with low microtubule affinity. Disrupting motor dimerization with structure-based mutagenesis drives dynein-1 into an open form with higher affinity for both microtubules and dynactin. We find the open form is also inhibited for movement and that dynactin relieves this by reorienting the motor domains to interact correctly with microtubules. Our model explains how dynactin binding to the dynein-1 tail directly stimulates its motor activity.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - 16-0093()

Mex3a Marks a Slowly Dividing Subpopulation of Lgr5+ Intestinal Stem Cells.

  • Barriga FM
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Highly proliferative Lgr5+ stem cells maintain the intestinal epithelium and are thought to be largely homogeneous. Although quiescent intestinal stem cell (ISC) populations have been described, the identity and features of such a population remain controversial. Here we report unanticipated heterogeneity within the Lgr5+ ISC pool. We found that expression of the RNA-binding protein Mex3a labels a slowly cycling subpopulation of Lgr5+ ISCs that contribute to all intestinal lineages with distinct kinetics. Single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed that Lgr5+ cells adopt two discrete states, one of which is defined by a Mex3a expression program and relatively low levels of proliferation genes. During homeostasis, Mex3a+ cells continually shift into the rapidly dividing, self-renewing ISC pool. Chemotherapy and radiation preferentially target rapidly dividing Lgr5+ cells but spare the Mex3a-high/Lgr5+ population, helping to promote regeneration of the intestinal epithelium following toxic insults. Thus, Mex3a defines a reserve-like ISC population within the Lgr5+ compartment.

Malaria parasite LIMP protein regulates sporozoite gliding motility and infectivity in mosquito and mammalian hosts.

  • Santos JM
  • Elife
  • 2017 May 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Gliding motility allows malaria parasites to migrate and invade tissues and cells in different hosts. It requires parasite surface proteins to provide attachment to host cells and extracellular matrices. Here, we identify the Plasmodium protein LIMP (the name refers to a gliding phenotype in the sporozoite arising from epitope tagging of the endogenous protein) as a key regulator for adhesion during gliding motility in the rodent malaria model P. berghei. Transcribed in gametocytes, LIMP is translated in the ookinete from maternal mRNA, and later in the sporozoite. The absence of LIMP reduces initial mosquito infection by 50%, impedes salivary gland invasion 10-fold, and causes a complete absence of liver invasion as mutants fail to attach to host cells. GFP tagging of LIMP caused a limping defect during movement with reduced speed and transient curvature changes of the parasite. LIMP is an essential motility and invasion factor necessary for malaria transmission.

The Role of Pancreatic Preproglucagon in Glucose Homeostasis in Mice.

  • Chambers AP
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2017 Apr 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is necessary for normal gluco-regulation, and it has been widely presumed that this function reflects the actions of GLP-1 released from enteroendocrine L cells. To test the relative importance of intestinal versus pancreatic sources of GLP-1 for physiological regulation of glucose, we administered a GLP-1R antagonist, exendin-[9-39] (Ex9), to mice with tissue-specific reactivation of the preproglucagon gene (Gcg). Ex9 impaired glucose tolerance in wild-type mice but had no impact on Gcg-null or GLP-1R KO mice, suggesting that Ex9 is a true and specific GLP-1R antagonist. Unexpectedly, Ex-9 had no effect on blood glucose in mice with restoration of intestinal Gcg. In contrast, pancreatic reactivation of Gcg fully restored the effect of Ex9 to impair both oral and i.p. glucose tolerance. These findings suggest an alternative model whereby islet GLP-1 also plays an important role in regulating glucose homeostasis.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK082480()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK093848()

Fatty Acids Regulate Germline Sex Determination through ACS-4-Dependent Myristoylation.

  • Tang H
  • Cell
  • 2017 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Fat metabolism has been linked to fertility and reproductive adaptation in animals and humans, and environmental sex determination potentially plays a role in the process. To investigate the impact of fatty acids (FA) on sex determination and reproductive development, we examined and observed an impact of FA synthesis and mobilization by lipolysis in somatic tissues on oocyte fate in Caenorhabditis elegans. The subsequent genetic analysis identified ACS-4, an acyl-CoA synthetase and its FA-CoA product, as key germline factors that mediate the role of FA in promoting oocyte fate through protein myristoylation. Further tests indicated that ACS-4-dependent protein myristoylation perceives and translates the FA level into regulatory cues that modulate the activities of MPK-1/MAPK and key factors in the germline sex-determination pathway. These findings, including a similar role of ACS-4 in a male/female species, uncover a likely conserved mechanism by which FA, an environmental factor, regulates sex determination and reproductive development.

Genetic Tracing of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channel Expression in the Peripheral Nervous System.

  • Bernal Sierra YA
  • Front Mol Neurosci
  • 2017 Mar 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Characterizing the distinct functions of the T-type ion channel subunits Cav3.1, 3.2 or 3.3 has proven difficult due to their highly conserved amino-acid sequences and the lack of pharmacological blockers specific for each subunit. To precisely determine the expression pattern of the Cav3.2 channel in the nervous system we generated two knock-in mouse strains that express EGFP or Cre recombinase under the control of the Cav3.2 gene promoter. We show that in the brains of these animals, the Cav3.2 channel is predominantly expressed in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In the peripheral nervous system, the activation of the promoter starts at E9.5 in neural crest cells that will give rise to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, but not sympathetic neurons. As development progresses the number of DRG cells expressing the Cav3.2 channel reaches around 7% of the DRG at E16.5, and remains constant until E18.5. Characterization of sensory neuron subpopulations at E18.5 showed that EGFP+ cells are a heterogeneous population consisting mainly of TrkB+ and TrkC+ cells, while only a small percentage of DRG cells were TrkA+. Genetic tracing of the sensory nerve end-organ innervation of the skin showed that the activity of the Cav3.2 channel promoter in sensory progenitors marks many mechanoreceptor and nociceptor endings, but spares slowly adapting mechanoreceptors with endings associated with Merkel cells. Our genetic analysis reveals for the first time that progenitors that express the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, defines a sensory specific lineage that populates a large proportion of the DRG. Using our Cav3.2-Cre mice together with AAV viruses containing a conditional fluorescent reporter (tdTomato) we could also show that Cre expression is largely restricted to two functionally distinct sensory neuron types in the adult ganglia. Cav3.2 positive neurons innervating the skin were found to only form lanceolate endings on hair follicles and are probably identical to D-hair receptors. A second population of nociceptive sensory neurons expressing the Cav3.2 gene was found to be positive for the calcitonin-gene related peptide but these neurons are deep tissue nociceptors that do not innervate the skin.

Funding information:
  • European Research Council - 294678()

SoxC Transcription Factors Promote Contralateral Retinal Ganglion Cell Differentiation and Axon Guidance in the Mouse Visual System.

  • Kuwajima T
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Mar 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Transcription factors control cell identity by regulating diverse developmental steps such as differentiation and axon guidance. The mammalian binocular visual circuit is comprised of projections of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to ipsilateral and contralateral targets in the brain. A transcriptional code for ipsilateral RGC identity has been identified, but less is known about the transcriptional regulation of contralateral RGC development. Here we demonstrate that SoxC genes (Sox4, 11, and 12) act on the progenitor-to-postmitotic transition to implement contralateral, but not ipsilateral, RGC differentiation, by binding to Hes5 and thus repressing Notch signaling. When SoxC genes are deleted in postmitotic RGCs, contralateral RGC axons grow poorly on chiasm cells in vitro and project ipsilaterally at the chiasm midline in vivo, and Plexin-A1 and Nr-CAM expression in RGCs is downregulated. These data implicate SoxC transcription factors in the regulation of contralateral RGC differentiation and axon guidance.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY012736()
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY015290()
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR046249()
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR060016()

Calpain-Mediated Proteolysis of Talin and FAK Regulates Adhesion Dynamics Necessary for Axon Guidance.

  • Kerstein PC
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Feb 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Guidance of axons to their proper synaptic target sites requires spatially and temporally precise modulation of biochemical signals within growth cones. Ionic calcium (Ca2+) is an essential signal for axon guidance that mediates opposing effects on growth cone motility. The diverse effects of Ca2+ arise from the precise localization of Ca2+ signals into microdomains containing specific Ca2+ effectors. For example, differences in the mechanical and chemical composition of the underlying substrata elicit local Ca2+ signals within growth cone filopodia that regulate axon guidance through activation of the protease calpain. However, how calpain regulates growth cone motility remains unclear. Here, we identify the adhesion proteins talin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as proteolytic targets of calpain in Xenopus laevis spinal cord neurons both in vivo and in vitro Inhibition of calpain increases the localization of endogenous adhesion signaling to growth cone filopodia. Using live cell microscopy and specific calpain-resistant point-mutants of talin (L432G) and FAK (V744G), we find that calpain inhibits paxillin-based adhesion assembly through cleavage of talin and FAK, and adhesion disassembly through cleavage of FAK. Blocking calpain cleavage of talin and FAK inhibits repulsive turning from focal uncaging of Ca2+ within filopodia. In addition, blocking calpain cleavage of talin and FAK in vivo promotes Rohon-Beard peripheral axon extension into the skin. These data demonstrate that filopodial Ca2+ signals regulate axon outgrowth and guidance through calpain regulation of adhesion dynamics through specific cleavage of talin and FAK.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The proper formation of neuronal networks requires accurate guidance of axons and dendrites during development by motile structures known as growth cones. Understanding the intracellular signaling mechanisms that govern growth cone motility will clarify how the nervous system develops and regenerates, and may identify areas of therapeutic intervention in disease or injury. One important signal that controls growth cones is that of local Ca2+ transients, which control the rate and direction of axon outgrowth. We demonstrate here that Ca2+-dependent inhibition axon outgrowth and guidance is mediated by calpain proteolysis of the adhesion proteins talin and focal adhesion kinase. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into Ca2+/calpain regulation of growth cone motility and axon guidance during neuronal development.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007507()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - F31 NS074732()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS099405()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R21 NS088477()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R56 NS041564()

In Vivo Imaging of Dentate Gyrus Mossy Cells in Behaving Mice.

  • Danielson NB
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Feb 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mossy cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus constitute a major excitatory principal cell type in the mammalian hippocampus; however, it remains unknown how these cells behave in vivo. Here, we have used two-photon Ca2+ imaging to monitor the activity of mossy cells in awake, behaving mice. We find that mossy cells are significantly more active than dentate granule cells in vivo, exhibit spatial tuning during head-fixed spatial navigation, and undergo robust remapping of their spatial representations in response to contextual manipulation. Our results provide a functional characterization of mossy cells in the behaving animal and demonstrate their active participation in spatial coding and contextual representation.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH100631()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - F30 NS090819()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS094668()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - U01 NS090583()

Hermes Regulates Axon Sorting in the Optic Tract by Post-Trancriptional Regulation of Neuropilin 1.

  • Hörnberg H
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2016 Dec 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

The establishment of precise topographic maps during neural development is facilitated by the presorting of axons in the pathway before they reach their targets. In the vertebrate visual system, such topography is seen clearly in the optic tract (OT) and in the optic radiations. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in pretarget axon sorting are poorly understood. Here, we show in zebrafish that the RNA-binding protein Hermes, which is expressed exclusively in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is involved in this process. Using a RiboTag approach, we show that Hermes acts as a negative translational regulator of specific mRNAs in RGCs. One of these targets is the guidance cue receptor Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1), which is sensitive to the repellent cue Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A). Hermes knock-down leads to topographic missorting in the OT through the upregulation of Nrp1. Restoring Nrp1 to appropriate levels in Hermes-depleted embryos rescues this effect and corrects the axon-sorting defect in the OT. Our data indicate that axon sorting relies on Hermes-regulated translation of Nrp1. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: An important mechanism governing the formation of the mature neural map is pretarget axon sorting within the sensory tract; however, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process remain largely unknown. The work presented here reveals a novel function for the RNA-binding protein Hermes in regulating the topographic sorting of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons in the optic tract and tectum. We find that Hermes negatively controls the translation of the guidance cue receptor Neuropilin-1 in RGCs, with Hermes knock-down resulting in aberrant growth cone cue sensitivity and axonal topographic misprojections. We characterize a novel RNA-based mechanism by which axons restrict their translatome developmentally to achieve proper targeting.

Funding information:
  • European Research Council - 322817()

Drosophila neprilysins control insulin signaling and food intake via cleavage of regulatory peptides.

  • Hallier B
  • Elife
  • 2016 Dec 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Insulin and IGF signaling are critical to numerous developmental and physiological processes, with perturbations being pathognomonic of various diseases, including diabetes. Although the functional roles of the respective signaling pathways have been extensively studied, the control of insulin production and release is only partially understood. Herein, we show that in Drosophila expression of insulin-like peptides is regulated by neprilysin activity. Concomitant phenotypes of altered neprilysin expression included impaired food intake, reduced body size, and characteristic changes in the metabolite composition. Ectopic expression of a catalytically inactive mutant did not elicit any of the phenotypes, which confirms abnormal peptide hydrolysis as a causative factor. A screen for corresponding substrates of the neprilysin identified distinct peptides that regulate insulin-like peptide expression, feeding behavior, or both. The high functional conservation of neprilysins and their substrates renders the characterized principles applicable to numerous species, including higher eukaryotes and humans.

Biallelic TBCD Mutations Cause Early-Onset Neurodegenerative Encephalopathy.

  • Miyake N
  • Am. J. Hum. Genet.
  • 2016 Oct 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

We describe four families with affected siblings showing unique clinical features: early-onset (before 1 year of age) progressive diffuse brain atrophy with regression, postnatal microcephaly, postnatal growth retardation, muscle weakness/atrophy, and respiratory failure. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified biallelic TBCD mutations in eight affected individuals from the four families. TBCD encodes TBCD (tubulin folding co-factor D), which is one of five tubulin-specific chaperones playing a pivotal role in microtubule assembly in all cells. A total of seven mutations were found: five missense mutations, one nonsense, and one splice site mutation resulting in a frameshift. In vitro cell experiments revealed the impaired binding between most mutant TBCD proteins and ARL2, TBCE, and β-tubulin. The in vivo experiments using olfactory projection neurons in Drosophila melanogaster indicated that the TBCD mutations caused loss of function. The wide range of clinical severity seen in this neurodegenerative encephalopathy may result from the residual function of mutant TBCD proteins. Furthermore, the autopsied brain from one deceased individual showed characteristic neurodegenerative findings: cactus and somatic sprout formations in the residual Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, which are also seen in some diseases associated with mitochondrial impairment. Defects of microtubule formation caused by TBCD mutations may underlie the pathomechanism of this neurodegenerative encephalopathy.

Developmental and adult expression patterns of the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR88 in the rat: Establishment of a dual nuclear-cytoplasmic localization.

  • Massart R
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2016 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

GPR88 is a neuronal cerebral orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been linked to various psychiatric disorders. However, no extensive description of its localization has been provided so far. Here, we investigate the spatiotemporal expression of the GPR88 in prenatal and postnatal rat tissues by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. GPR88 protein was initially detected at embryonic day 16 (E16) in the striatal primordium. From E16-E20 to adulthood, the highest expression levels of both protein and mRNA were observed in striatum, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and neocortex, whereas in spinal cord, pons, and medulla GPR88 expression remains discrete. We observed an intracellular redistribution of GPR88 during cortical lamination. In the cortical plate of the developing cortex, GPR88 presents a classical GPCR plasma membrane/cytoplasmic localization that shifts, on the day of birth, to nuclei of neurons progressively settling in layers V to II. This intranuclear localization remains throughout adulthood and was also detected in monkey and human cortex as well as in the amygdala and hypothalamus of rats. Apart from the central nervous system, GPR88 was transiently expressed at high levels in peripheral tissues, including adrenal cortex (E16-E21) and cochlear ganglia (E19-P3), and also at moderate levels in retina (E18-E19) and spleen (E21-P7). The description of the GPR88 anatomical expression pattern may provide precious functional insights into this novel receptor. Furthermore, the GRP88 nuclear localization suggests nonclassical GPCR modes of action of the protein that could be relevant for cortical development and psychiatric disorders. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2776-2802, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

A tissue-specific protein purification approach in Caenorhabditis elegans identifies novel interaction partners of DLG-1/Discs large.

  • Waaijers S
  • BMC Biol.
  • 2016 Aug 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP/MS) is a widely used approach to identify protein interactions and complexes. In multicellular organisms, the accurate identification of protein complexes by AP/MS is complicated by the potential heterogeneity of complexes in different tissues. Here, we present an in vivo biotinylation-based approach for the tissue-specific purification of protein complexes from Caenorhabditis elegans. Tissue-specific biotinylation is achieved by the expression in select tissues of the bacterial biotin ligase BirA, which biotinylates proteins tagged with the Avi peptide. RESULTS: We generated N- and C-terminal tags combining GFP with the Avi peptide sequence, as well as four BirA driver lines expressing BirA ubiquitously and specifically in the seam and hyp7 epidermal cells, intestine, or neurons. We validated the ability of our approach to identify bona fide protein interactions by identifying the known LGL-1 interaction partners PAR-6 and PKC-3. Purification of the Discs large protein DLG-1 identified several candidate interaction partners, including the AAA-type ATPase ATAD-3 and the uncharacterized protein MAPH-1.1. We have identified the domains that mediate the DLG-1/ATAD-3 interaction, and show that this interaction contributes to C. elegans development. MAPH-1.1 co-purified specifically with DLG-1 purified from neurons, and shared limited homology with the microtubule-associated protein MAP1A, a known neuronal interaction partner of mammalian DLG4/PSD95. A CRISPR/Cas9-engineered GFP::MAPH-1.1 fusion was broadly expressed and co-localized with microtubules. CONCLUSIONS: The method we present here is able to purify protein complexes from specific tissues. We uncovered a series of DLG-1 interactors, and conclude that ATAD-3 is a biologically relevant interaction partner of DLG-1. Finally, we conclude that MAPH-1.1 is a microtubule-associated protein of the MAP1 family and a candidate neuron-specific interaction partner of DLG-1.

Funding information:
  • NIH HHS - S10 OD010737(United States)

Cerebellar Premotor Output Neurons Collateralize to Innervate the Cerebellar Cortex.

  • Houck BD
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2015 Oct 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Motor commands computed by the cerebellum are hypothesized to use corollary discharge, or copies of outgoing commands, to accelerate motor corrections. Identifying sources of corollary discharge, therefore, is critical for testing this hypothesis. Here we verified that the pathway from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in mice includes collaterals of cerebellar premotor output neurons, mapped this collateral pathway, and identified its postsynaptic targets. Following bidirectional tracer injections into a distal target of the cerebellar nuclei, the ventrolateral thalamus, we observed retrogradely labeled somata in the cerebellar nuclei and mossy fiber terminals in the cerebellar granule layer, consistent with collateral branching. Corroborating these observations, bidirectional tracer injections into the cerebellar cortex retrogradely labeled somata in the cerebellar nuclei and boutons in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test whether nuclear output neurons projecting to the red nucleus also collateralize to the cerebellar cortex, we used a Cre-dependent viral approach, avoiding potential confounds of direct red nucleus-to-cerebellum projections. Injections of a Cre-dependent GFP-expressing virus into Ntsr1-Cre mice, which express Cre selectively in the cerebellar nuclei, retrogradely labeled somata in the interposed nucleus, and putative collateral branches terminating as mossy fibers in the cerebellar cortex. Postsynaptic targets of all labeled mossy fiber terminals were identified using immunohistochemical Golgi cell markers and electron microscopic profiles of granule cells, indicating that the collaterals of nuclear output neurons contact both Golgi and granule cells. These results clarify the organization of a subset of nucleocortical projections that constitute an experimentally accessible corollary discharge pathway within the cerebellum.

Wnt5a inhibits K(+) currents in hippocampal synapses through nitric oxide production.

  • Parodi J
  • Mol. Cell. Neurosci.
  • 2015 Sep 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hippocampal synapses play a key role in memory and learning processes by inducing long-term potentiation and depression. Wnt signaling is essential in the development and maintenance of synapses via several mechanisms. We have previously found that Wnt5a induces the production of nitric oxide (NO), which modulates NMDA receptor expression in the postsynaptic regions of hippocampal neurons. Here, we report that Wnt5a selectively inhibits a voltage-gated K(+) current (Kv current) and increases synaptic activity in hippocampal slices. Further supporting a specific role for Wnt5a, the soluble Frizzled receptor protein (sFRP-2; a functional Wnt antagonist) fully inhibits the effects of Wnt5a. We additionally show that these responses to Wnt5a are mediated by activation of a ROR2 receptor and increased NO production because they are suppressed by the shRNA-mediated knockdown of ROR2 and by 7-nitroindazole, a specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS. Together, our results show that Wnt5a increases NO production by acting on ROR2 receptors, which in turn inhibit Kv currents. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which Wnt5a may regulate the excitability of hippocampal neurons.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01 CA190174(United States)

Nonmyocytic androgen receptor regulates the sexually dimorphic development of the embryonic bulbocavernosus muscle.

  • Ipulan LA
  • Endocrinology
  • 2014 Jul 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

The bulbocavernosus (BC) is a sexually dimorphic muscle observed only in males. Androgen receptor knockout mouse studies show the loss of BC formation. This suggests that androgen signaling plays a vital role in its development. Androgen has been known to induce muscle hypertrophy through satellite cell activation and myonuclei accretion during muscle regeneration and growth. Whether the same mechanism is present during embryonic development is not yet elucidated. To identify the mechanism of sexual dimorphism during BC development, the timing of morphological differences was first established. It was revealed that the BC was morphologically different between male and female mice at embryonic day (E) 16.5. Differences in the myogenic process were detected at E15.5. The male BC possesses a higher number of proliferating undifferentiated myoblasts. To identify the role of androgen signaling in this process, muscle-specific androgen receptor (AR) mutation was introduced, which resulted in no observable phenotypes. Hence, the expression of AR in the BC was examined and found that the AR did not colocalize with any muscle markers such as Myogenic differentiation 1, Myogenin, and paired box transcription factor 7. It was revealed that the mesenchyme surrounding the BC expressed AR and the BC started to express AR at E15.5. AR mutation on the nonmyocytic cells using spalt-like transcription factor 1 (Sall1) Cre driver mouse was performed, which resulted in defective BC formation. It was revealed that the number of proliferating undifferentiated myoblasts was reduced in the Sall1 Cre:AR(L-/Y) mutant embryos, and the adult mutants were devoid of BC. The transition of myoblasts from proliferation to differentiation is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. An increased expression of p21 was observed in the BC myoblast of the Sall1 Cre:AR(L-/Y) mutant and wild-type female. Altogether this study suggests that the nonmyocytic AR may paracrinely regulate the proliferation of myoblast possibly through inhibiting p21 expression in myoblasts of the BC.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS083726(United States)

Essential roles of epithelial bone morphogenetic protein signaling during prostatic development.

  • Omori A
  • Endocrinology
  • 2014 Jul 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Prostate is a male sex-accessory organ. The prostatic epithelia consist primarily of basal and luminal cells that differentiate from embryonic urogenital sinus epithelia. Prostate tumors are believed to originate in the basal and luminal cells. However, factors that promote normal epithelial differentiation have not been well elucidated, particularly for bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling. This study shows that Bmp signaling prominently increases during prostatic differentiation in the luminal epithelia, which is monitored by the expression of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8. To elucidate the mechanism of epithelial differentiation and the function of Bmp signaling during prostatic development, conditional male mutant mouse analysis for the epithelial-specific Bmp receptor 1a (Bmpr1a) was performed. We demonstrate that Bmp signaling is indispensable for luminal cell maturation, which regulates basal cell proliferation. Expression of the prostatic epithelial regulatory gene Nkx3.1 was significantly reduced in the Bmpr1a mutants. These results indicate that Bmp signaling is a key factor for prostatic epithelial differentiation, possibly by controlling the prostatic regulatory gene Nkx3.1.

Funding information:
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR066703(United States)

Synaptic alterations in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy.

  • Kopeikina KJ
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2013 Apr 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Synapse loss, rather than the hallmark amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques or tau-filled neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), is considered the most predictive pathological feature associated with cognitive status in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. The role of Aβ in synapse loss is well established, but despite data linking tau to synaptic function, the role of tau in synapse loss remains largely undetermined. Here we test the hypothesis that human mutant P301L tau overexpression in a mouse model (rTg4510) will lead to age-dependent synaptic loss and dysfunction. Using array tomography and two methods of quantification (automated, threshold-based counting and a manual stereology-based technique) we demonstrate that overall synapse density is maintained in the neuropil, implicating synapse loss commensurate with the cortical atrophy known to occur in this model. Multiphoton in vivo imaging reveals close to 30% loss of apical dendritic spines of individual pyramidal neurons, suggesting these cells may be particularly vulnerable to tau-induced degeneration. Postmortem, we confirm the presence of tau in dendritic spines of rTg4510-YFP mouse brain by array tomography. These data implicate tau-induced loss of a subset of synapses that may be accompanied by compensatory increases in other synaptic subtypes, thereby preserving overall synapse density. Biochemical fractionation of synaptosomes from rTg4510 brain demonstrates a significant decrease in expression of several synaptic proteins, suggesting a functional deficit of remaining synapses in the rTg4510 brain. Together, these data show morphological and biochemical synaptic consequences in response to tau overexpression in the rTg4510 mouse model.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - (United Kingdom)

Global expression profiling of globose basal cells and neurogenic progression within the olfactory epithelium.

  • Krolewski RC
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2013 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Ongoing, lifelong neurogenesis maintains the neuronal population of the olfactory epithelium in the face of piecemeal neuronal turnover and restores it following wholesale loss. The molecular phenotypes corresponding to different stages along the progression from multipotent globose basal cell (GBC) progenitor to differentiated olfactory sensory neuron are poorly characterized. We used the transgenic expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and cell surface markers to FACS-isolate ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs, Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs and immature neurons, and ΔOMP-eGFP(+) mature neurons from normal adult mice. In addition, the latter two populations were also collected 3 weeks after olfactory bulb ablation, a lesion that results in persistently elevated neurogenesis. Global profiling of mRNA from the populations indicates that all stages of neurogenesis share a cohort of >2,100 genes that are upregulated compared to sustentacular cells. A further cohort of >1,200 genes are specifically upregulated in GBCs as compared to sustentacular cells and differentiated neurons. The increased rate of neurogenesis caused by olfactory bulbectomy had little effect on the transcriptional profile of the Neurog1-eGFP(+) population. In contrast, the abbreviated lifespan of ΔOMP-eGFP(+) neurons born in the absence of the bulb correlated with substantial differences in gene expression as compared to the mature neurons of the normal epithelium. Detailed examination of the specific genes upregulated in the different progenitor populations revealed that the chromatin modifying complex proteins LSD1 and coREST were expressed sequentially in upstream ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs and Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs/immature neurons. The expression patterns of these proteins are dynamically regulated after activation of the epithelium by methyl bromide lesion.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - U54-HL108460(United States)

Differential expression of components of the retinoic acid signaling pathway in the adult mouse olfactory epithelium.

  • Peluso CE
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Nov 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Position within a tissue often correlates with cellular phenotype, for example, differential expression of odorant receptors and cell adhesion molecules across the olfactory mucosa (OM). The association between position and phenotype is often paralleled by gradations in the concentration of retinoic acid (RA), caused by differential expression of the RA synthetic enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDH). We show here that RALDH-1, -2, and -3 are enriched in the sustentacular cells, deep fibroblasts of the lamina propria, and the superficial fibroblasts, respectively, of the ventral and lateral OM as compared to the dorsomedial OM. The shift from high to low expression of the RALDHs matches the boundary defined by the differential expression of OCAM/mamFasII. Further, we found that RA-binding proteins are expressed in the epithelium overlying the RALDH-3 expressing fibroblasts of the lamina propria. Both findings suggest that local alterations in RA concentration may be more important than a gradient of RA across the epithelial plane, per se. In addition, RALDH-3 is found in a small population of basal cells in the ventral and lateral epithelium, which expand and contribute to the neuronal lineage following MeBr lesion. Indeed, transduction with a retrovirus expressing a dominant negative form of retinoic acid receptor type alpha blocks the reappearance of mature, olfactory marker protein (OMP) (+) olfactory neurons as compared to empty vector. These results support the notion of a potential role for RA, both in maintaining the spatial organization of the normal olfactory epithelium and in reestablishing the neuronal population during regeneration after injury.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK020572(United States)

Expression of pax6 and sox2 in adult olfactory epithelium.

  • Guo Z
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Nov 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The olfactory epithelium maintains stem and progenitor cells that support the neuroepithelium's life-long capacity to reconstitute after injury. However, the identity of the stem cells--and their regulation--remain poorly defined. The transcription factors Pax6 and Sox2 are characteristic of stem cells in many tissues, including the brain. Therefore, we assessed the expression of Pax6 and Sox2 in normal olfactory epithelium and during epithelial regeneration after methyl bromide lesion or olfactory bulbectomy. Sox2 is found in multiple kinds of cells in normal epithelium, including sustentacular cells, horizontal basal cells, and some globose basal cells. Pax6 is co-expressed with Sox2 in all these, but is also found in duct/gland cells as well as olfactory neurons that innervate necklace glomeruli. Most of the Sox2/Pax6-positive globose basal cells are actively cycling, but some express the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1), and are presumably mitotically quiescent. Among globose basal cells, Sox2 and Pax6 are co-expressed by putatively multipotent progenitors (labeled by neither anti-Mash1 nor anti-Neurog1) and neuron-committed transit amplifying cells (which express Mash1). However, Sox2 and Pax6 are expressed by only a minority of immediate neuronal precursors (Neurog1- and NeuroD1-expressing). The assignment of Sox2 and Pax6 to these categories of globose basal cells is confirmed by a temporal analysis of transcription factor expression during the recovery of the epithelium from methyl bromide-induced injury. Each of the Sox2/Pax6-colabeled cell types is at a remove from the birth of neurons; thus, suppressing their differentiation may be among the roles of Sox2/Pax6 in the olfactory epithelium.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01GM080646-04S2(United States)

A novel model of retinal ablation demonstrates that the extent of rod cell death regulates the origin of the regenerated zebrafish rod photoreceptors.

  • Montgomery JE
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Mar 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The adult zebrafish retina continuously produces rod photoreceptors from infrequent Müller glial cell division, yielding neuronal progenitor cells that migrate to the outer nuclear layer and become rod precursor cells that are committed to differentiate into rods. Retinal damage models suggested that rod cell death induces regeneration from rod precursor cells, whereas loss of any other retinal neurons activates Müller glia proliferation to produce pluripotent neuronal progenitors that can generate any other neuronal cell type in the retina. We tested this hypothesis by creating two transgenic lines that expressed the E. coli nitroreductase enzyme fused to EGFP (NTR-EGFP) in only rods. Treating transgenic adults with metronidazole resulted in two rod cell death models. First, killing all rods throughout the Tg(zop:nfsB-EGFP)(nt19) retina induced robust Müller glial proliferation, which yielded clusters of neuronal progenitor cells. In contrast, ablating only a subset of rods across the Tg(zop:nfsB-EGFP)(nt20) retina led to rod precursor, but not Müller glial, cell proliferation. We propose that two different criteria determine whether rod cell death will induce a regenerative response from the Müller glia rather than from the resident rod precursor cells in the ONL. First, there must be a large amount of rod cell death to initiate Müller glia proliferation. Second, the rod cell death must be acute, rather than chronic, to stimulate regeneration from the Müller glia. This suggests that the zebrafish retina possesses mechanisms to quantify the amount and timing of rod cell death.

Genetic dissection of neural circuit anatomy underlying feeding behavior in Drosophila: distinct classes of hugin-expressing neurons.

  • Bader R
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2007 Jun 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

The hugin gene of Drosophila encodes a neuropeptide with homology to mammalian neuromedin U. The hugin-expressing neurons are localized exclusively to the subesophageal ganglion of the central nervous system and modulate feeding behavior in response to nutrient signals. These neurons send neurites to the protocerebrum, the ventral nerve cord, the ring gland, and the pharynx and may interact with the gustatory sense organs. In this study, we have investigated the morphology of the hugin neurons at a single-cell level by using clonal analysis. We show that single cells project to only one of the four major targets. In addition, the neurites of the different hugin cells overlap in a specific brain region lateral to the foramen of the esophagus, which could be a new site of neuropeptide release for feeding regulation. Our study reveals novel complexity in the morphology of individual hugin neurons, which has functional implication for how they coordinate feeding behavior and growth.

Funding information:
  • NIAAA NIH HHS - R01 AA017413(United States)

Localization of the mouse alpha1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) in the brain: alpha1AAR is expressed in neurons, GABAergic interneurons, and NG2 oligodendrocyte progenitors.

  • Papay R
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2006 Jul 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

alpha(1)-Adrenergic receptors (ARs) are not well defined in the central nervous system. The particular cell types and areas that express these receptors are uncertain because of the lack of high avidity antibodies and selective ligands. We have developed transgenic mice that either systemically overexpress the human alpha(1A)-AR subtype fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or express the EGFP protein alone under the control of the mouse alpha(1A)-AR promoter. We confirm our transgenic model against the alpha(1A)-AR knockout mouse, which expresses the LacZ gene in place of the coding region for the alpha(1A)-AR. By using these models, we have now determined cellular localization of the alpha(1A)-AR in the brain, at the protein level. The alpha(1A)-AR or the EGFP protein is expressed prominently in neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, midbrain, pontine olivary nuclei, trigeminal nuclei, cerebellum, and spinal cord. The types of neurons were diverse, and the alpha(1A)-AR colocalized with markers for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Recordings from alpha(1A)-AR EGFP-expressing cells in the stratum oriens of the hippocampal CA1 region confirmed that these cells were interneurons. We could not detect expression of the alpha(1A)-AR in mature astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or cerebral blood vessels, but we could detect the alpha(1A)-AR in oligodendrocyte progenitors. We conclude that the alpha(1A)-AR is abundant in the brain, expressed in various types of neurons, and may regulate the function of oligodendrocyte progenitors, interneurons, GABA, and NMDA receptor containing neurons.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - R01 HG003224(United States)