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Goat anti-Chicken IgY (H+L) Secondary Antibody, Alexa Fluor 647

RRID:AB_2535866

Antibody ID

AB_2535866

Target Antigen

Chicken IgY (H+L) chicken

Proper Citation

(Thermo Fisher Scientific Cat# A-21449, RRID:AB_2535866)

Clonality

polyclonal antibody

Comments

Applications: IHC (1-10 µg/mL), IF (1-10 µg/mL), ICC (1-10 µg/mL)

Host Organism

goat

Vendor

Thermo Fisher Scientific Go To Vendor

Serpin Facilitates Tumor-Suppressive Cell Competition by Blocking Toll-Mediated Yki Activation in Drosophila.

  • Katsukawa M
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2018 Jun 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Normal epithelial tissue exerts an intrinsic tumor-suppressive effect against oncogenically transformed cells. In Drosophila imaginal epithelium, clones of oncogenic polarity-deficient cells mutant for scribble (scrib) or discs large (dlg) are eliminated by cell competition when surrounded by wild-type cells. Here, through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we identify Serpin5 (Spn5), a secreted negative regulator of Toll signaling, as a crucial factor for epithelial cells to eliminate scrib mutant clones from epithelium. Downregulation of Spn5 in wild-type cells leads to elevation of Toll signaling in neighboring scrib cells. Strikingly, forced activation of Toll signaling or Toll-related receptor (TRR) signaling in scrib clones transforms scrib cells from losers to supercompetitors, resulting in tumorous overgrowth of mutant clones. Mechanistically, Toll activation in scrib clones leads to c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and F-actin accumulation, which cause strong activation of the Hippo pathway effector Yorkie that blocks cell death and promotes cell proliferation. Our data suggest that Spn5 secreted from normal epithelial cells acts as a component of the extracellular surveillance system that facilitates elimination of pre-malignant cells from epithelium.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA097214(United States)

Dynamic Architecture of DNA Repair Complexes and the Synaptonemal Complex at Sites of Meiotic Recombination.

  • Woglar A
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jun 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated and repaired in a highly regulated manner to ensure formation of crossovers (COs) while also enabling efficient non-CO repair to restore genome integrity. We use structured-illumination microscopy to investigate the dynamic architecture of DSB repair complexes at meiotic recombination sites in relationship to the synaptonemal complex (SC). DSBs resected at both ends are converted into inter-homolog repair intermediates harboring two populations of BLM helicase and RPA, flanking a single population of MutSγ. These intermediates accumulate until late pachytene, when repair proteins disappear from non-CO sites and CO-designated sites become enveloped by SC-central region proteins, acquire a second MutSγ population, and lose RPA. These and other data suggest that the SC may protect CO intermediates from being dismantled inappropriately and promote CO maturation by generating a transient CO-specific repair compartment, thereby enabling differential timing and outcome of repair at CO and non-CO sites.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA016672(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM053804()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM067268()

RNP-Granule Assembly via Ataxin-2 Disordered Domains Is Required for Long-Term Memory and Neurodegeneration.

  • Bakthavachalu B
  • Neuron
  • 2018 May 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Human Ataxin-2 is implicated in the cause and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and type 2 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-2). In Drosophila, a conserved atx2 gene is essential for animal survival as well as for normal RNP-granule assembly, translational control, and long-term habituation. Like its human homolog, Drosophila Ataxin-2 (Atx2) contains polyQ repeats and additional intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). We demonstrate that Atx2 IDRs, which are capable of mediating liquid-liquid phase transitions in vitro, are essential for efficient formation of neuronal mRNP assemblies in vivo. Remarkably, ΔIDR mutants that lack neuronal RNP granules show normal animal development, survival, and fertility. However, they show defects in long-term memory formation/consolidation as well as in C9ORF72 dipeptide repeat or FUS-induced neurodegeneration. Together, our findings demonstrate (1) that higher-order mRNP assemblies contribute to long-term neuronal plasticity and memory, and (2) that a targeted reduction in RNP-granule formation efficiency can alleviate specific forms of neurodegeneration.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - 5K12 CA 076931(United States)

Probing nano-organization of astroglia with multi-color super-resolution microscopy.

  • Heller JP
  • J. Neurosci. Res.
  • 2018 May 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Astroglia are essential for brain development, homeostasis, and metabolic support. They also contribute actively to the formation and regulation of synaptic circuits, by successfully handling, integrating, and propagating physiological signals of neural networks. The latter occurs mainly by engaging a versatile mechanism of internal Ca2+ fluctuations and regenerative waves prompting targeted release of signaling molecules into the extracellular space. Astroglia also show substantial structural plasticity associated with age- and use-dependent changes in neural circuitry. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood, mainly because of the extraordinary complex morphology of astroglial compartments on the nanoscopic scale. This complexity largely prevents direct experimental access to astroglial processes, most of which are beyond the diffraction limit of optical microscopy. Here we employed super-resolution microscopy (direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy; dSTORM), to visualize astroglial organization on the nanoscale, in culture and in thin brain slices, as an initial step to understand the structural basis of astrocytic nano-physiology. We were able to follow nanoscopic morphology of GFAP-enriched astrocytes, which adapt a flattened shape in culture and a sponge-like structure in situ, with GFAP fibers of varied diameters. We also visualized nanoscopic astrocytic processes using the ubiquitous cytosolic astrocyte marker proteins S100β and glutamine synthetase. Finally, we overexpressed and imaged membrane-targeted pHluorin and lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (N-terminal domain) -green fluorescent protein (lck-GFP), to better understand the molecular cascades underlying some common astroglia-targeted fluorescence imaging techniques. The results provide novel, albeit initial, insights into the cellular organization of astroglia on the nanoscale, paving the way for function-specific studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - G0600368()
  • Medical Research Council - G0801316()
  • Medical Research Council - G0802216()
  • Medical Research Council - G0900613()

Myelination of Neuronal Cell Bodies when Myelin Supply Exceeds Axonal Demand.

  • Almeida RG
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2018 Apr 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

The correct targeting of myelin is essential for nervous system formation and function. Oligodendrocytes in the CNS myelinate some axons, but not others, and do not myelinate structures including cell bodies and dendrites [1]. Recent studies indicate that extrinsic signals, such as neuronal activity [2, 3] and cell adhesion molecules [4], can bias myelination toward some axons and away from cell bodies and dendrites, indicating that, in vivo, neuronal and axonal cues regulate myelin targeting. In vitro, however, oligodendrocytes have an intrinsic propensity to myelinate [5-7] and can promiscuously wrap inert synthetic structures resembling neuronal processes [8, 9] or cell bodies [4]. A current therapeutic goal for the treatment of demyelinating diseases is to greatly promote oligodendrogenesis [10-13]; thus, it is important to test how accurately extrinsic signals regulate the oligodendrocyte's intrinsic program of myelination in vivo. Here, we test the hypothesis that neurons regulate myelination with sufficient stringency to always ensure correct targeting. Surprisingly, however, we find that myelin targeting in vivo is not very stringent and that mistargeting occurs readily when oligodendrocyte and myelin supply exceed axonal demand. We find that myelin is mistargeted to neuronal cell bodies in zebrafish mutants with fewer axons and independently in drug-treated zebrafish with increased oligodendrogenesis. Additionally, by increasing myelin production of oligodendrocytes in zebrafish and mice, we find that excess myelin is also inappropriately targeted to cell bodies. Our results suggest that balancing oligodendrocyte-intrinsic programs of myelin supply with axonal demand is essential for correct myelin targeting in vivo and highlight potential liabilities of strongly promoting oligodendrogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA016672(United States)

Rbfox1 Regulates Synaptic Transmission through the Inhibitory Neuron-Specific vSNARE Vamp1.

  • Vuong CK
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Apr 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dysfunction of the neuronal RNA binding protein RBFOX1 has been linked to epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders. Rbfox1 loss in mice leads to neuronal hyper-excitability and seizures, but the physiological basis for this is unknown. We identify the vSNARE protein Vamp1 as a major Rbfox1 target. Vamp1 is strongly downregulated in Rbfox1 Nes-cKO mice due to loss of 3' UTR binding by RBFOX1. Cytoplasmic Rbfox1 stimulates Vamp1 expression in part by blocking microRNA-9. We find that Vamp1 is specifically expressed in inhibitory neurons, and that both Vamp1 knockdown and Rbfox1 loss lead to decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission and E/I imbalance. Re-expression of Vamp1 selectively within interneurons rescues the electrophysiological changes in the Rbfox1 cKO, indicating that Vamp1 loss is a major contributor to the Rbfox1 Nes-cKO phenotype. The regulation of interneuron-specific Vamp1 by Rbfox1 provides a paradigm for broadly expressed RNA-binding proteins performing specialized functions in defined neuronal subtypes.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - DK094311(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM114463()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007185()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH060919()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R21 MH101684()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - F31 NS093923()

Spatial-Temporal Lineage Restrictions of Embryonic p63+ Progenitors Establish Distinct Stem Cell Pools in Adult Airways.

  • Yang Y
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Mar 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Basal cells (BCs) are p63-expressing multipotent progenitors of skin, tracheoesophageal and urinary tracts. p63 is abundant in developing airways; however, it remains largely unclear how embryonic p63+ cells contribute to the developing and postnatal respiratory tract epithelium, and ultimately how they relate to adult BCs. Using lineage-tracing and functional approaches in vivo, we show that p63+ cells arising from the lung primordium are initially multipotent progenitors of airway and alveolar lineages but later become restricted proximally to generate the tracheal adult stem cell pool. In intrapulmonary airways, these cells are maintained immature to adulthood in bronchi, establishing a rare p63+Krt5- progenitor cell population that responds to H1N1 virus-induced severe injury. Intriguingly, this pool includes a CC10 lineage-labeled p63+Krt5- cell subpopulation required for a full H1N1-response. These data elucidate key aspects in the establishment of regionally distinct adult stem cell pools in the respiratory system, potentially with relevance to other organs.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA HL006151-02(United States)
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA112403()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA193455()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R35 HL135834()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - HHSN272201400008C()

Insm1 Induces Neural Progenitor Delamination in Developing Neocortex via Downregulation of the Adherens Junction Belt-Specific Protein Plekha7.

  • Tavano S
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Mar 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Delamination of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from the ventricular surface is a crucial prerequisite to form the subventricular zone, the germinal layer linked to the expansion of the mammalian neocortex in development and evolution. Here, we dissect the molecular mechanism by which the transcription factor Insm1 promotes the generation of basal progenitors (BPs). Insm1 protein is most highly expressed in newborn BPs in mouse and human developing neocortex. Forced Insm1 expression in embryonic mouse neocortex causes NPC delamination, converting apical to basal radial glia. Insm1 represses the expression of the apical adherens junction belt-specific protein Plekha7. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of Plekha7 expression suffices to cause NPC delamination. Plekha7 overexpression impedes the intrinsic and counteracts the Insm1-induced, NPC delamination. Our findings uncover a novel molecular mechanism underlying NPC delamination in which a BP-genic transcription factor specifically targets the integrity of the apical adherens junction belt, rather than adherens junction components as such.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA BC010763-05(United States)

The Strength of Mechanical Forces Determines the Differentiation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

  • Li J
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

The differentiation of alveolar epithelial type I (AT1) and type II (AT2) cells is essential for the lung gas exchange function. Disruption of this process results in neonatal death or in severe lung diseases that last into adulthood. We developed live imaging techniques to characterize the mechanisms that control alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. We discovered that mechanical forces generated from the inhalation of amniotic fluid by fetal breathing movements are essential for AT1 cell differentiation. We found that a large subset of alveolar progenitor cells is able to protrude from the airway epithelium toward the mesenchyme in an FGF10/FGFR2 signaling-dependent manner. The cell protrusion process results in enrichment of myosin in the apical region of protruded cells; this myosin prevents these cells from being flattened by mechanical forces, thereby ensuring their AT2 cell fate. Our study demonstrates that mechanical forces and local growth factors synergistically control alveolar epithelial cell differentiation.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - (United States)

Jak2-mediated phosphorylation of Atoh1 is critical for medulloblastoma growth.

  • Klisch TJ
  • Elife
  • 2017 Nov 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Treatment for medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children, remains limited to surgical resection, radiation, and traditional chemotherapy; with long-term survival as low as 50-60% for Sonic Hedgehog (Shh)-type medulloblastoma. We have shown that the transcription factor Atonal homologue 1 (Atoh1) is required for Shh-type medulloblastoma development in mice. To determine whether reducing either Atoh1 levels or activity in tumors after their development is beneficial, we studied Atoh1 dosage and modifications in Shh-type medulloblastoma. Heterozygosity of Atoh1 reduced tumor occurrence and prolonged survival. We discovered tyrosine 78 of Atoh1 is phosphorylated by a Jak2-mediated pathway only in tumor-initiating cells and in human SHH-type medulloblastoma. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 78 stabilizes Atoh1, increases Atoh1's transcriptional activity, and is independent of canonical Jak2 signaling. Importantly, inhibition of Jak2 impairs tyrosine 78 phosphorylation and tumor growth in vivo. Taken together, inhibiting Jak2-mediated tyrosine 78 phosphorylation could provide a viable therapy for medulloblastoma.

Molecular Dissection of Neuroligin 2 and Slitrk3 Reveals an Essential Framework for GABAergic Synapse Development.

  • Li J
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Nov 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the brain, many types of interneurons make functionally diverse inhibitory synapses onto principal neurons. Although numerous molecules have been identified to function in inhibitory synapse development, it remains unknown whether there is a unifying mechanism for development of diverse inhibitory synapses. Here we report a general molecular mechanism underlying hippocampal inhibitory synapse development. In developing neurons, the establishment of GABAergic transmission depends on Neuroligin 2 (NL2), a synaptic cell adhesion molecule (CAM). During maturation, inhibitory synapse development requires both NL2 and Slitrk3 (ST3), another CAM. Importantly, NL2 and ST3 interact with nanomolar affinity through their extracellular domains to synergistically promote synapse development. Selective perturbation of the NL2-ST3 interaction impairs inhibitory synapse development with consequent disruptions in hippocampal network activity and increased seizure susceptibility. Our findings reveal how unique postsynaptic CAMs work in concert to control synaptogenesis and establish a general framework for GABAergic synapse development.

Proteomic analysis of cell cycle progression in asynchronous cultures, including mitotic subphases, using PRIMMUS.

  • Ly T
  • Elife
  • 2017 Oct 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

The temporal regulation of protein abundance and post-translational modifications is a key feature of cell division. Recently, we analysed gene expression and protein abundance changes during interphase under minimally perturbed conditions (Ly et al., 2014, 2015). Here, we show that by using specific intracellular immunolabelling protocols, FACS separation of interphase and mitotic cells, including mitotic subphases, can be combined with proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry. Using this PRIMMUS (PRoteomic analysis of Intracellular iMMUnolabelled cell Subsets) approach, we now compare protein abundance and phosphorylation changes in interphase and mitotic fractions from asynchronously growing human cells. We identify a set of 115 phosphorylation sites increased during G2, termed 'early risers'. This set includes phosphorylation of S738 on TPX2, which we show is important for TPX2 function and mitotic progression. Further, we use PRIMMUS to provide the first a proteome-wide analysis of protein abundance remodeling between prophase, prometaphase and anaphase.

Dynamic Palmitoylation Targets MAP6 to the Axon to Promote Microtubule Stabilization during Neuronal Polarization.

  • Tortosa E
  • Neuron
  • 2017 May 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are main candidates to stabilize neuronal microtubules, playing an important role in establishing axon-dendrite polarity. However, how MAPs are selectively targeted to specific neuronal compartments remains poorly understood. Here, we show specific localization of microtubule-associated protein 6 (MAP6)/stable tubule-only polypeptide (STOP) throughout neuronal maturation and its role in axonal development. In unpolarized neurons, MAP6 is present at the Golgi complex and in secretory vesicles. As neurons mature, MAP6 is translocated to the proximal axon, where it binds and stabilizes microtubules. Further, we demonstrate that dynamic palmitoylation, mediated by the family of α/β Hydrolase domain-containing protein 17 (ABHD17A-C) depalmitoylating enzymes, controls shuttling of MAP6 between membranes and microtubules and is required for MAP6 retention in axons. We propose a model in which MAP6's palmitoylation mediates microtubule stabilization, allows efficient organelle trafficking, and controls axon maturation in vitro and in situ.

A subcellular map of the human proteome.

  • Thul PJ
  • Science
  • 2017 May 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Resolving the spatial distribution of the human proteome at a subcellular level can greatly increase our understanding of human biology and disease. Here we present a comprehensive image-based map of subcellular protein distribution, the Cell Atlas, built by integrating transcriptomics and antibody-based immunofluorescence microscopy with validation by mass spectrometry. Mapping the in situ localization of 12,003 human proteins at a single-cell level to 30 subcellular structures enabled the definition of the proteomes of 13 major organelles. Exploration of the proteomes revealed single-cell variations in abundance or spatial distribution and localization of about half of the proteins to multiple compartments. This subcellular map can be used to refine existing protein-protein interaction networks and provides an important resource to deconvolute the highly complex architecture of the human cell.

Hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease in Stem-Cell-Derived Human Neurons Transplanted into Mouse Brain.

  • Espuny-Camacho I
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Mar 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) provide a unique entry to study species-specific aspects of human disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, in vitro culture of neurons deprives them of their natural environment. Here we transplanted human PSC-derived cortical neuronal precursors into the brain of a murine AD model. Human neurons differentiate and integrate into the brain, express 3R/4R Tau splice forms, show abnormal phosphorylation and conformational Tau changes, and undergo neurodegeneration. Remarkably, cell death was dissociated from tangle formation in this natural 3D model of AD. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we observed upregulation of genes involved in myelination and downregulation of genes related to memory and cognition, synaptic transmission, and neuron projection. This novel chimeric model for AD displays human-specific pathological features and allows the analysis of different genetic backgrounds and mutations during the course of the disease.

Astrocytes Control Circadian Timekeeping in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus via Glutamatergic Signaling.

  • Brancaccio M
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Mar 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus orchestrates daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in mammals. Its circadian (∼24 hr) oscillations of gene expression and electrical activity are generated intrinsically and can persist indefinitely in temporal isolation. This robust and resilient timekeeping is generally regarded as a product of the intrinsic connectivity of its neurons. Here we show that neurons constitute only one "half" of the SCN clock, the one metabolically active during circadian daytime. In contrast, SCN astrocytes are active during circadian nighttime, when they suppress the activity of SCN neurons by regulating extracellular glutamate levels. This glutamatergic gliotransmission is sensed by neurons of the dorsal SCN via specific pre-synaptic NMDA receptor assemblies containing NR2C subunits. Remarkably, somatic genetic re-programming of intracellular clocks in SCN astrocytes was capable of remodeling circadian behavioral rhythms in adult mice. Thus, SCN circuit-level timekeeping arises from interdependent and mutually supportive astrocytic-neuronal signaling.

A tissue-specific protein purification approach in Caenorhabditis elegans identifies novel interaction partners of DLG-1/Discs large.

  • Waaijers S
  • BMC Biol.
  • 2016 Aug 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP/MS) is a widely used approach to identify protein interactions and complexes. In multicellular organisms, the accurate identification of protein complexes by AP/MS is complicated by the potential heterogeneity of complexes in different tissues. Here, we present an in vivo biotinylation-based approach for the tissue-specific purification of protein complexes from Caenorhabditis elegans. Tissue-specific biotinylation is achieved by the expression in select tissues of the bacterial biotin ligase BirA, which biotinylates proteins tagged with the Avi peptide. RESULTS: We generated N- and C-terminal tags combining GFP with the Avi peptide sequence, as well as four BirA driver lines expressing BirA ubiquitously and specifically in the seam and hyp7 epidermal cells, intestine, or neurons. We validated the ability of our approach to identify bona fide protein interactions by identifying the known LGL-1 interaction partners PAR-6 and PKC-3. Purification of the Discs large protein DLG-1 identified several candidate interaction partners, including the AAA-type ATPase ATAD-3 and the uncharacterized protein MAPH-1.1. We have identified the domains that mediate the DLG-1/ATAD-3 interaction, and show that this interaction contributes to C. elegans development. MAPH-1.1 co-purified specifically with DLG-1 purified from neurons, and shared limited homology with the microtubule-associated protein MAP1A, a known neuronal interaction partner of mammalian DLG4/PSD95. A CRISPR/Cas9-engineered GFP::MAPH-1.1 fusion was broadly expressed and co-localized with microtubules. CONCLUSIONS: The method we present here is able to purify protein complexes from specific tissues. We uncovered a series of DLG-1 interactors, and conclude that ATAD-3 is a biologically relevant interaction partner of DLG-1. Finally, we conclude that MAPH-1.1 is a microtubule-associated protein of the MAP1 family and a candidate neuron-specific interaction partner of DLG-1.

Funding information:
  • NIH HHS - S10 OD010737(United States)

Tonic PKA Activity Regulates SK Channel Nanoclustering and Somatodendritic Distribution.

  • Abiraman K
  • J. Mol. Biol.
  • 2016 Jun 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels mediate a potassium conductance in the brain and are involved in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. SK channels show a distinct subcellular localization that is crucial for their neuronal functions. However, the mechanisms that control this spatial distribution are unknown. We imaged SK channels labeled with fluorophore-tagged apamin and monitored SK channel nanoclustering at the single molecule level by combining atomic force microscopy and toxin (i.e., apamin) pharmacology. Using these two complementary approaches, we found that native SK channel distribution in pyramidal neurons, across the somatodendritic domain, depends on ongoing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) levels, strongly limiting SK channel expression at the pyramidal neuron soma. Furthermore, tonic cAMP-PKA levels also controlled whether SK channels were expressed in nanodomains as single entities or as a group of multiple channels. Our study reveals a new level of regulation of SK channels by cAMP-PKA and suggests that ion channel topography and nanoclustering might be under the control of second messenger cascades.