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Goat anti-Rabbit IgG (H+L) Cross-Adsorbed Secondary Antibody, Alexa Fluor 647

RRID:AB_2535812

Antibody ID

AB_2535812

Target Antigen

Rabbit IgG (H+L) Cross-Adsorbed rabbit

Proper Citation

(Thermo Fisher Scientific Cat# A-21244, RRID:AB_2535812)

Clonality

polyclonal antibody

Comments

Applications: IF (4 µg/mL), Flow (1-10 µg/mL), ICC (4 µg/mL)

Host Organism

goat

Vendor

Thermo Fisher Scientific Go To Vendor

The Epigenetic State of PRDM16-Regulated Enhancers in Radial Glia Controls Cortical Neuron Position.

  • Baizabal JM
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Jun 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

The epigenetic landscape is dynamically remodeled during neurogenesis. However, it is not understood how chromatin modifications in neural stem cells instruct the formation of complex structures in the brain. We report that the histone methyltransferase PRDM16 is required in radial glia to regulate lineage-autonomous and stage-specific gene expression programs that control number and position of upper layer cortical projection neurons. PRDM16 regulates the epigenetic state of transcriptional enhancers to activate genes involved in intermediate progenitor cell production and repress genes involved in cell migration. The histone methyltransferase domain of PRDM16 is necessary in radial glia to promote cortical neuron migration through transcriptional silencing. We show that repression of the gene encoding the E3 ubiquitin ligase PDZRN3 by PRDM16 determines the position of upper layer neurons. These findings provide insights into how epigenetic control of transcriptional enhancers in radial glial determines the organization of the mammalian cerebral cortex.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA109038-04(United States)

Ischemic Brain Injury Leads to Brain Edema via Hyperthermia-Induced TRPV4 Activation.

  • Hoshi Y
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jun 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Brain edema is characterized by an increase in net brain water content, which results in an increase in brain volume. Although brain edema is associated with a high fatality rate, the cellular and molecular processes of edema remain largely unclear. Here, we developed an in vitro model of ischemic stroke-induced edema in which male mouse brain slices were treated with oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to mimic ischemia. We continuously measured the cross-sectional area of the brain slice for 150 min under macroscopic microscopy, finding that OGD induces swelling of brain slices. OGD-induced swelling was prevented by pharmacologically blocking or genetically knocking out the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), a member of the thermosensitive TRP channel family. Because TRPV4 is activated at around body temperature and its activation is enhanced by heating, we next elevated the temperature of the perfusate in the recording chamber, finding that hyperthermia induces swelling via TRPV4 activation. Furthermore, using the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of a fluorescent-thermosensitive probe, we confirmed that OGD treatment increases the temperature of brain slices through the activation of glutamate receptors. Finally, we found that brain edema following traumatic brain injury was suppressed in TRPV4-deficient male mice in vivo Thus, our study proposes a novel mechanism: hyperthermia activates TRPV4 and induces brain edema after ischemia.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain edema is characterized by an increase in net brain water content, which results in an increase in brain volume. Although brain edema is associated with a high fatality rate, the cellular and molecular processes of edema remain unclear. Here, we developed an in vitro model of ischemic stroke-induced edema in which mouse brain slices were treated with oxygen-glucose deprivation. Using this system, we showed that the increase in brain temperature and the following activation of the thermosensitive cation channel TRPV4 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 4) are involved in the pathology of edema. Finally, we confirmed that TRPV4 is involved in brain edema in vivo using TRPV4-deficient mice, concluding that hyperthermia activates TRPV4 and induces brain edema after ischemia.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - GM58272(United States)

Higher-Order Inter-chromosomal Hubs Shape 3D Genome Organization in the Nucleus.

  • Quinodoz SA
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jun 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into a 3-dimensional structure in the nucleus. Current methods for studying genome-wide structure are based on proximity ligation. However, this approach can fail to detect known structures, such as interactions with nuclear bodies, because these DNA regions can be too far apart to directly ligate. Accordingly, our overall understanding of genome organization remains incomplete. Here, we develop split-pool recognition of interactions by tag extension (SPRITE), a method that enables genome-wide detection of higher-order interactions within the nucleus. Using SPRITE, we recapitulate known structures identified by proximity ligation and identify additional interactions occurring across larger distances, including two hubs of inter-chromosomal interactions that are arranged around the nucleolus and nuclear speckles. We show that a substantial fraction of the genome exhibits preferential organization relative to these nuclear bodies. Our results generate a global model whereby nuclear bodies act as inter-chromosomal hubs that shape the overall packaging of DNA in the nucleus.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - R01 GM063692(United States)
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - U01 HG007910()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - U01 HL130007()
  • NIDA NIH HHS - U01 DA040612()

Distinct timing of neurogenesis of ipsilateral and contralateral retinal ganglion cells.

  • Marcucci F
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 May 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

In higher vertebrates, the circuit formed by retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) projecting ipsilaterally (iRGCs) or contralaterally (cRGCs) to the brain permits binocular vision and depth perception. iRGCs and cRGCs differ in their position within the retina and in expression of transcription, guidance and activity-related factors. To parse whether these two populations also differ in the timing of their genesis, a feature of distinct neural subtypes and associated projections, we used newer birthdating methods and cell subtype specific markers to determine birthdate and cell cycle exit more precisely than previously. In the ventrotemporal (VT) retina, i- and cRGCs intermingle and neurogenesis in this zone lags behind RGC production in the rest of the retina where only cRGCs are positioned. In addition, within the VT retina, i- and cRGC populations are born at distinct times: neurogenesis of iRGCs surges at E13, and cRGCs arise as early as E14, not later in embryogenesis as reported. Moreover, in the ventral ciliary margin zone (CMZ), which contains progenitors that give rise to some iRGCs in ventral neural retina (Marcucci et al., 2016), cell cycle exit is slower than in other retinal regions in which progenitors give rise only to cRGCs. Further, when the cell cycle regulator Cyclin D2 is missing, cell cycle length in the CMZ is further reduced, mirroring the reduction of both i- and cRGCs in the Cyclin D2 mutant. These results strengthen the view that differential regulation of cell cycle dynamics at the progenitor level is associated with specific RGC fates and laterality of axonal projection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM61001(United States)

RNP-Granule Assembly via Ataxin-2 Disordered Domains Is Required for Long-Term Memory and Neurodegeneration.

  • Bakthavachalu B
  • Neuron
  • 2018 May 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Human Ataxin-2 is implicated in the cause and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and type 2 spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-2). In Drosophila, a conserved atx2 gene is essential for animal survival as well as for normal RNP-granule assembly, translational control, and long-term habituation. Like its human homolog, Drosophila Ataxin-2 (Atx2) contains polyQ repeats and additional intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). We demonstrate that Atx2 IDRs, which are capable of mediating liquid-liquid phase transitions in vitro, are essential for efficient formation of neuronal mRNP assemblies in vivo. Remarkably, ΔIDR mutants that lack neuronal RNP granules show normal animal development, survival, and fertility. However, they show defects in long-term memory formation/consolidation as well as in C9ORF72 dipeptide repeat or FUS-induced neurodegeneration. Together, our findings demonstrate (1) that higher-order mRNP assemblies contribute to long-term neuronal plasticity and memory, and (2) that a targeted reduction in RNP-granule formation efficiency can alleviate specific forms of neurodegeneration.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - 5K12 CA 076931(United States)

Neuroanatomical details of the lateral neurons of Drosophila melanogaster support their functional role in the circadian system.

  • Schubert FK
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 May 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Drosophila melanogaster is a long-standing model organism in the circadian clock research. A major advantage is the relative small number of about 150 neurons, which built the circadian clock in Drosophila. In our recent work, we focused on the neuroanatomical properties of the lateral neurons of the clock network. By applying the multicolor-labeling technique Flybow we were able to identify the anatomical similarity of the previously described E2 subunit of the evening oscillator of the clock, which is built by the 5th small ventrolateral neuron (5th s-LNv ) and one ITP positive dorsolateral neuron (LNd ). These two clock neurons share the same spatial and functional properties. We found both neurons innervating the same brain areas with similar pre- and postsynaptic sites in the brain. Here the anatomical findings support their shared function as a main evening oscillator in the clock network like also found in previous studies. A second quite surprising finding addresses the large lateral ventral PDF-neurons (l-LNv s). We could show that the four hardly distinguishable l-LNv s consist of two subgroups with different innervation patterns. While three of the neurons reflect the well-known branching pattern reproduced by PDF immunohistochemistry, one neuron per brain hemisphere has a distinguished innervation profile and is restricted only to the proximal part of the medulla-surface. We named this neuron "extra" l-LNv (l-LNv x). We suggest the anatomical findings reflect different functional properties of the two l-LNv subgroups.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA031363(United States)

Rbfox1 Regulates Synaptic Transmission through the Inhibitory Neuron-Specific vSNARE Vamp1.

  • Vuong CK
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Apr 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dysfunction of the neuronal RNA binding protein RBFOX1 has been linked to epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders. Rbfox1 loss in mice leads to neuronal hyper-excitability and seizures, but the physiological basis for this is unknown. We identify the vSNARE protein Vamp1 as a major Rbfox1 target. Vamp1 is strongly downregulated in Rbfox1 Nes-cKO mice due to loss of 3' UTR binding by RBFOX1. Cytoplasmic Rbfox1 stimulates Vamp1 expression in part by blocking microRNA-9. We find that Vamp1 is specifically expressed in inhibitory neurons, and that both Vamp1 knockdown and Rbfox1 loss lead to decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission and E/I imbalance. Re-expression of Vamp1 selectively within interneurons rescues the electrophysiological changes in the Rbfox1 cKO, indicating that Vamp1 loss is a major contributor to the Rbfox1 Nes-cKO phenotype. The regulation of interneuron-specific Vamp1 by Rbfox1 provides a paradigm for broadly expressed RNA-binding proteins performing specialized functions in defined neuronal subtypes.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - DK094311(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM114463()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007185()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH060919()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R21 MH101684()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - F31 NS093923()

The Response of Prostate Smooth Muscle Cells to Testosterone Is Determined by the Subcellular Distribution of the Androgen Receptor.

  • Peinetti N
  • Endocrinology
  • 2018 Feb 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Androgen signaling in prostate smooth muscle cells (pSMCs) is critical for the maintenance of prostate homeostasis, the alterations of which are a central aspect in the development of pathological conditions. Testosterone can act through the classic androgen receptor (AR) in the cytoplasm, eliciting genomic signaling, or through different types of receptors located at the plasma membrane for nongenomic signaling. We aimed to find evidence of nongenomic testosterone-signaling mechanisms in pSMCs and their participation in cell proliferation, differentiation, and the modulation of the response to lipopolysaccharide. We demonstrated that pSMCs can respond to testosterone by a rapid activation of ERK1/2 and Akt. Furthermore, a pool of ARs localized at the cell surface of pSMCs is responsible for a nongenomic testosterone-induced increase in cell proliferation. Through membrane receptor stimulation, testosterone favors a muscle phenotype, indicated by an increase in smooth muscle markers. We also showed that the anti-inflammatory effects of testosterone, capable of attenuating lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory actions, are promoted only by receptors located inside the cell. We postulate that testosterone might perform prohomeostatic effects through intracellular-initiated mechanisms by modulating cell proliferation and inflammation, whereas some pathological, hyperproliferative actions would be induced by membrane-initiated nongenomic signaling in pSMCs.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA AG000741-09(United States)

Myocardial Polyploidization Creates a Barrier to Heart Regeneration in Zebrafish.

  • González-Rosa JM
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Correlative evidence suggests that polyploidization of heart muscle, which occurs naturally in post-natal mammals, creates a barrier to heart regeneration. Here, we move beyond a correlation by demonstrating that experimental polyploidization of zebrafish cardiomyocytes is sufficient to suppress their proliferative potential during regeneration. Initially, we determined that zebrafish myocardium becomes susceptible to polyploidization upon transient cytokinesis inhibition mediated by dominant-negative Ect2. Using a transgenic strategy, we generated adult animals containing mosaic hearts composed of differentially labeled diploid and polyploid-enriched cardiomyocyte populations. Diploid cardiomyocytes outcompeted their polyploid neighbors in producing regenerated heart muscle. Moreover, hearts composed of equivalent proportions of diploid and polyploid cardiomyocytes failed to regenerate altogether, demonstrating that a critical percentage of diploid cardiomyocytes is required to achieve heart regeneration. Our data identify cardiomyocyte polyploidization as a barrier to heart regeneration and suggest that mobilizing rare diploid cardiomyocytes in the human heart will improve its regenerative capacity.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - (Canada)
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL127067()

Binding of PLD2-Generated Phosphatidic Acid to KIF5B Promotes MT1-MMP Surface Trafficking and Lung Metastasis of Mouse Breast Cancer Cells.

  • Wang Z
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Little is known about the cellular events promoting metastasis. We show that knockout of phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which generates the signaling lipid phosphatidic acid (PA), inhibits lung metastases in the mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Neu transgenic mouse breast cancer model. PLD2 promotes local invasion through the regulation of the plasma membrane targeting of MT1-MMP and its associated invadopodia. A liposome pull-down screen identifies KIF5B, the heavy chain of the motor protein kinesin-1, as a new PA-binding protein. In vitro assays reveal that PA specifically and directly binds to the C terminus of KIF5B. The binding between PLD2-generated PA and KIF5B is required for the vesicular association of KIF5B, surface localization of MT1-MMP, invadopodia, and invasion in cancer cells. Taken together, these results identify a role of PLD2-generated PA in the regulation of kinesin-1 motor functions and breast cancer metastasis and suggest PLD2 as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic breast cancer.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA112403()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA193455()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL119478()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM114260()

Inferior Olivary TMEM16B Mediates Cerebellar Motor Learning.

  • Zhang Y
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Aug 30

Literature context:


Abstract:

Ca2+-activated ion channels shape membrane excitability and Ca2+ dynamics in response to cytoplasmic Ca2+ elevation. Compared to the Ca2+-activated K+ channels, known as BK and SK channels, the physiological importance of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) in neurons has been largely overlooked. Here we report that CaCCs coexist with BK and SK channels in inferior olivary (IO) neurons that send climbing fibers to innervate cerebellar Purkinje cells for the control of motor learning and timing. Ca2+ influx through the dendritic high-threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ channels activates CaCCs, which contribute to membrane repolarization of IO neurons. Loss of TMEM16B expression resulted in the absence of CaCCs in IO neurons, leading to markedly diminished action potential firing of IO neurons in TMEM16B knockout mice. Moreover, these mutant mice exhibited severe cerebellar motor learning deficits. Our findings thus advance the understanding of the neurophysiology of CaCCs and the ionic basis of IO neuron excitability.

Reck and Gpr124 Are Essential Receptor Cofactors for Wnt7a/Wnt7b-Specific Signaling in Mammalian CNS Angiogenesis and Blood-Brain Barrier Regulation.

  • Cho C
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Aug 30

Literature context:


Abstract:

Reck, a GPI-anchored membrane protein, and Gpr124, an orphan GPCR, have been implicated in Wnt7a/Wnt7b signaling in the CNS vasculature. We show here that vascular endothelial cell (EC)-specific reduction in Reck impairs CNS angiogenesis and that EC-specific postnatal loss of Reck, combined with loss of Norrin, impairs blood-brain barrier (BBB) maintenance. The most N-terminal domain of Reck binds to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and immunoglobulin (Ig) domains of Gpr124, and weakening this interaction by targeted mutagenesis reduces Reck/Gpr124 stimulation of Wnt7a signaling in cell culture and impairs CNS angiogenesis. Finally, a soluble Gpr124(LRR-Ig) probe binds to cells expressing Frizzled, Wnt7a or Wnt7b, and Reck, and a soluble Reck(CC1-5) probe binds to cells expressing Frizzled, Wnt7a or Wnt7b, and Gpr124. These experiments indicate that Reck and Gpr124 are part of the cell surface protein complex that transduces Wnt7a- and Wnt7b-specific signals in mammalian CNS ECs to promote angiogenesis and regulate the BBB.

Persistent Expression of VCAM1 in Radial Glial Cells Is Required for the Embryonic Origin of Postnatal Neural Stem Cells.

  • Hu XL
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Jul 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

During development, neural stem cells (NSCs) undergo transitions from neuroepithelial cells to radial glial cells (RGCs), and later, a subpopulation of slowly dividing RGCs gives rise to the quiescent adult NSCs that populate the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ). Here we show that VCAM1, a transmembrane protein previously found in quiescent adult NSCs, is expressed by a subpopulation of embryonic RGCs, in a temporal and region-specific manner. Loss of VCAM1 reduced the number of active embryonic RGCs by stimulating their premature neuronal differentiation while preventing quiescence in the slowly dividing RGCs. This in turn diminished the embryonic origin of postnatal NSCs, resulting in loss of adult NSCs and defective V-SVZ regeneration. VCAM1 affects the NSC fate by signaling through its intracellular domain to regulate β-catenin signaling in a context-dependent manner. Our findings provide new insight on how stem cells in the embryo are preserved to meet the need for growth and regeneration.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R37 NS019904(United States)

Biased Oxytocinergic Modulation of Midbrain Dopamine Systems.

  • Xiao L
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Jul 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

The release of dopamine (DA) regulates rewarding behavior and motor actions through striatum-targeting efferents from ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Here, we map and functionally characterize axonal projections from oxytocin neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to midbrain DA regions. Electrophysiological recordings of DA neurons reveal that both the application of oxytocin and optogenetic stimulation of oxytocinergic terminals suffice to increase DA neuron activity in the VTA but downregulate it in SNc. This biased modulation is mediated by oxytocin and vasopressin G-protein-coupled receptors. Oxytocin release directly activates DA neurons and indirectly inhibits them through local GABA neurons, but the relative magnitudes of the two mechanisms differ in VTA and SNc. Oxytocin-modulated DA neurons give rise to canonical striatal projections. Since hypothalamic oxytocinergic projections also target the striatum, oxytocin is poised to bias the balance of DA tone through multiple sites in vertebrate reward circuits.

Synchronized HIV assembly by tunable PIP2 changes reveals PIP2 requirement for stable Gag anchoring.

  • Mücksch F
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jun 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

HIV-1 assembles at the plasma membrane (PM) of infected cells. PM association of the main structural protein Gag depends on its myristoylated MA domain and PM PI(4,5)P2. Using a novel chemical biology tool that allows rapidly tunable manipulation of PI(4,5)P2 levels in living cells, we show that depletion of PI(4,5)P2 completely prevents Gag PM targeting and assembly site formation. Unexpectedly, PI(4,5)P2 depletion also caused loss of pre-assembled Gag lattices from the PM. Subsequent restoration of PM PI(4,5)P2 reinduced assembly site formation even in the absence of new protein synthesis, indicating that the dissociated Gag molecules remained assembly competent. These results reveal an important role of PI(4,5)P2 for HIV-1 morphogenesis beyond Gag recruitment to the PM and suggest a dynamic equilibrium of Gag-lipid interactions. Furthermore, they establish an experimental system that permits synchronized induction of HIV-1 assembly leading to induced production of infectious virions by targeted modulation of Gag PM targeting.

Active Touch and Self-Motion Encoding by Merkel Cell-Associated Afferents.

  • Severson KS
  • Neuron
  • 2017 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Touch perception depends on integrating signals from multiple types of peripheral mechanoreceptors. Merkel-cell associated afferents are thought to play a major role in form perception by encoding surface features of touched objects. However, activity of Merkel afferents during active touch has not been directly measured. Here, we show that Merkel and unidentified slowly adapting afferents in the whisker system of behaving mice respond to both self-motion and active touch. Touch responses were dominated by sensitivity to bending moment (torque) at the base of the whisker and its rate of change and largely explained by a simple mechanical model. Self-motion responses encoded whisker position within a whisk cycle (phase), not absolute whisker angle, and arose from stresses reflecting whisker inertia and activity of specific muscles. Thus, Merkel afferents send to the brain multiplexed information about whisker position and surface features, suggesting that proprioception and touch converge at the earliest neural level.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - P30 NS050274()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS034814()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS089652()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R35 NS097344()

Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis Occurs on Multiple Timescales and Is Mediated by Formin-Dependent Actin Assembly.

  • Soykan T
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Feb 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neurotransmission is based on the exocytic fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) followed by endocytic membrane retrieval and the reformation of SVs. Recent data suggest that at physiological temperature SVs are internalized via clathrin-independent ultrafast endocytosis (UFE) within hundreds of milliseconds, while other studies have postulated a key role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) of SV proteins on a timescale of seconds to tens of seconds. Here we demonstrate using cultured hippocampal neurons as a model that at physiological temperature SV endocytosis occurs on several timescales from less than a second to several seconds, yet, is largely independent of clathrin. Clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) of SV membranes is mediated by actin-nucleating formins such as mDia1, which are required for the formation of presynaptic endosome-like vacuoles from which SVs reform. Our results resolve previous discrepancies in the field and suggest that SV membranes are predominantly retrieved via CIE mediated by formin-dependent actin assembly.

Cdk5 Regulation of the GRAB-Mediated Rab8-Rab11 Cascade in Axon Outgrowth.

  • Furusawa K
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Jan 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neurons communicate with each other through their axons and dendrites. However, a full characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in axon and dendrite formation is still incomplete. Neurite outgrowth requires the supply of membrane components for surface expansion. Two membrane sources for axon outgrowth are suggested: Golgi secretary vesicles and endocytic recycling endosomes. In non-neuronal cells, trafficking of secretary vesicles from Golgi is regulated by Rab8, a member of Rab small GTPases, and that of recycling endosomes is by Rab11, another member of Rabs. However, whether these vesicles are coordinately or independently transported in growing axons is unknown. Herein, we find that GRAB, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab8, is a novel regulator of axon outgrowth. Knockdown of GRAB suppressed axon outgrowth of cultured mouse brain cortical neurons. GRAB mediates the interaction between Rab11A and Rab8A, and this activity is regulated by phosphorylation at Ser169 and Ser180 by Cdk5-p35. The nonphosphorylatable GRAB mutant S169/180A promoted axonal outgrowth to a greater extent than did the phosphomimetic GRAB mutant S169/180D. Phosphorylation of GRAB suppressed its guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and its ability to recruit Rab8A- to Rab11A-positive endosomes. In vivo function of GRAB and its Cdk5-phophorylation were shown in migration and process formation of developing neurons in embryonic mouse brains. These results indicate that GRAB regulates axonal outgrowth via activation and recruitment of Rab8A- to Rab11A-positive endosomes in a Cdk5-dependent manner. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: While axon outgrowth requires membrane supply for surface expansion, the molecular mechanisms regulating the membrane transport in growing axons remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that GRAB, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab8, is a novel regulator of axon outgrowth. GRAB promotes the axonal membrane transport by mediating the interaction between Rab11 and Rab8 in neurons. The activity of GRAB is regulated by phosphorylation with Cdk5. We describe an in vivo role for GRAB and its Cdk5 phosphorylation during neuronal migration and process formation in embryonic brains. Thus, the membrane supply for axonal outgrowth is regulated by Cdk5 through the Rab11-GRAB-Rab8 cascade.

Proteomic Analysis of Unbounded Cellular Compartments: Synaptic Clefts.

  • Loh KH
  • Cell
  • 2016 Aug 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cellular compartments that cannot be biochemically isolated are challenging to characterize. Here we demonstrate the proteomic characterization of the synaptic clefts that exist at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Normal brain function relies on the careful balance of these opposing neural connections, and understanding how this balance is achieved relies on knowledge of their protein compositions. Using a spatially restricted enzymatic tagging strategy, we mapped the proteomes of two of the most common excitatory and inhibitory synaptic clefts in living neurons. These proteomes reveal dozens of synaptic candidates and assign numerous known synaptic proteins to a specific cleft type. The molecular differentiation of each cleft allowed us to identify Mdga2 as a potential specificity factor influencing Neuroligin-2's recruitment of presynaptic neurotransmitters at inhibitory synapses.