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Donkey anti-Rabbit IgG (H+L) Highly Cross-Adsorbed Secondary Antibody, Alexa Fluor 488

RRID:AB_2535792

Antibody ID

AB_2535792

Target Antigen

Rabbit IgG (H+L) Highly Cross-Adsorbed rabbit

Proper Citation

(Thermo Fisher Scientific Cat# A-21206, RRID:AB_2535792)

Clonality

polyclonal antibody

Comments

Applications: ICC (2 µg/mL), IF (2 µg/mL), IHC (1-10 µg/mL), Flow (1-10 µg/mL)

Host Organism

donkey

Vendor

Thermo Fisher Scientific Go To Vendor

Cat Num

A-21206 also A21206

Publications that use this research resource

Identification of NeuN immunopositive cells in the adult mouse subventricular zone.

  • Saito K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Aug 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the adult rodent subventricular zone (SVZ), there are neural stem cells (NSCs) and the specialized neurogenic niche is critical to maintain their stemness. To date, many cellular and noncellular factors that compose the neurogenic niche and markers to identify subpopulations of Type A cells have been confirmed. In particular, neurotransmitters regulate adult neurogenesis and mature neurons in the SVZ have been only partially analyzed. Moreover, Type A cells, descendants of NSCs, are highly heterogeneous and more molecular markers are still needed to identify them. In the present study, we systematically classified NeuN, commonly used as a marker of mature and immature post-mitotic neurons, immunopositive (+) cells within the adult mouse SVZ. These SVZ-NeuN+ cells (SVZ-Ns) were mainly classified into two types. One was mature SVZ-Ns (M-SVZ-Ns). Neurochemical properties of M-SVZ-Ns were similar to those of striatal neurons, but their birth date and morphology were different. M-SVZ-Ns were generated during embryonic and early postnatal stages with bipolar peaks and extended their processes along the wall of the lateral ventricle. The second type was small SVZ-Ns (S-SVZ-Ns) with features of Type A cells. They expressed not only markers of Type A cells, but also proliferated and migrated from the SVZ to the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, S-SVZ-Ns could be classified into two types by their spatial locations and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression. Our data indicate that M-SVZ-Ns are a new component of the neurogenic niche and S-SVZ-Ns are newly identified subpopulations of Type A cells.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM102869-01(United States)

Cancer Lipid Metabolism Confers Antiangiogenic Drug Resistance.

  • Iwamoto H
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Jul 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Intrinsic and evasive antiangiogenic drug (AAD) resistance is frequently developed in cancer patients, and molecular mechanisms underlying AAD resistance remain largely unknown. Here we describe AAD-triggered, lipid-dependent metabolic reprogramming as an alternative mechanism of AAD resistance. Unexpectedly, tumor angiogenesis in adipose and non-adipose environments is equally sensitive to AAD treatment. AAD-treated tumors in adipose environment show accelerated growth rates in the presence of a minimal number of microvessels. Mechanistically, AAD-induced tumor hypoxia initiates the fatty acid oxidation metabolic reprogramming and increases uptake of free fatty acid (FFA) that stimulates cancer cell proliferation. Inhibition of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1) significantly compromises the FFA-induced cell proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological loss of CPT1 function sensitizes AAD therapeutic efficacy and enhances its anti-tumor effects. Together, we propose an effective cancer therapy concept by combining drugs that target angiogenesis and lipid metabolism.

Funding information:
  • British Heart Foundation - G0802266(United Kingdom)

Angiotensin II triggers peripheral macrophage-to-sensory neuron redox crosstalk to elicit pain.

  • Shepherd AJ
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jul 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Injury, inflammation and nerve damage initiate a wide variety of cellular and molecular processes that culminate in hyperexcitation of sensory nerves, which underlies chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Using behavioral readouts of pain hypersensitivity induced by Angiotensin II (Ang II) injection into mouse hindpaws, our study shows that activation of the type 2 Ang II receptor (AT2R) and the cell damage-sensing ion channel TRPA1 are required for peripheral mechanical pain sensitization induced by Ang II in male and female mice. However, we show that AT2R is not expressed in mouse and human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. Instead, expression/activation of AT2R on peripheral/skin macrophages (MΦs) constitutes a critical trigger of mouse and human DRG sensory neuron excitation. Ang II-induced peripheral mechanical pain hypersensitivity can be attenuated by chemogenetic depletion of peripheral MΦs. Furthermore, AT2R activation in MΦs triggers production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, which trans-activate TRPA1 on mouse and human DRG sensory neurons, via cysteine-modification of the channel. Our study thus identifies a translatable immune cell-to-sensory neuron signaling crosstalk underlying peripheral nociceptor sensitization. This form of cell-to-cell signaling represents a critical peripheral mechanism for chronic pain, and thus identifies multiple druggable analgesic targets.Significance Statement: Pain is a widespread problem that is under-managed by currently available analgesics. Findings from a recent clinical trial on a type-II angiotensin II receptor (AT2R) antagonist showed effective analgesia for neuropathic pain. AT2R antagonists have been shown to reduce neuropathy-, inflammation- and bone cancer-associated pain in rodents. We report that activation of AT2R in macrophages that infiltrate the site of injury, but not in sensory neurons, triggers an intercellular redox communication with sensory neurons via activation of the cell damage/pain-sensing ion channel TRPA1. This macrophage-to-sensory neuron crosstalk results in peripheral pain sensitization. Our findings provide an evidence-based mechanism underlying the analgesic action of AT2R antagonists, which could accelerate the development of efficacious non-opioid analgesic drugs for multiple pain conditions.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01NS077521(United States)

Cholinergic innervation of principal neurons in the cochlear nucleus of the Mongolian gerbil.

  • Gillet C
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Jul 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Principal neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) receive powerful ascending excitation and pass on the auditory information with exquisite temporal fidelity. Despite being dominated by ascending inputs, the VCN also receives descending cholinergic connections from olivocochlear neurons and from higher regions in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum. In Mongolian gerbils, acetylcholine acts as an excitatory and modulatory neurotransmitter on VCN neurons, but the anatomical structure of cholinergic innervation of gerbil VCN is not well described. We applied fluorescent immunohistochemical staining to elucidate the development and the cellular localization of presynaptic and postsynaptic components of the cholinergic system in the VCN of the Mongolian gerbil. We found that cholinergic fibers (stained with antibodies against the vesicular acetylcholine transporter) were present before hearing onset at P5, but innervation density increased in animals after P10. Early in development cholinergic fibers invaded the VCN from the medial side, spread along the perimeter and finally innervated all parts of the nucleus only after the onset of hearing. Cholinergic fibers ran in a rostro-caudal direction within the nucleus and formed en-passant swellings in the neuropil between principal neurons. Nicotinic and muscarinic receptors were expressed differentially in the VCN, with nicotinic receptors being mostly expressed in dendritic areas while muscarinic receptors were located predominantly in somatic membranes. These anatomical data support physiological indications that cholinergic innervation plays a role in modulating information processing in the cochlear nucleus.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC009453-02(United States)

Local Arrangement of Fibronectin by Myofibroblasts Governs Peripheral Nuclear Positioning in Muscle Cells.

  • Roman W
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Jul 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Skeletal muscle cells (myofibers) are rod-shaped multinucleated cells surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) basal lamina. In contrast to other cell types, nuclei in myofibers are positioned just below the plasma membrane at the cell periphery. Peripheral nuclear positioning occurs during myogenesis and is driven by myofibril crosslinking and contraction. Here we show that peripheral nuclear positioning is triggered by local accumulation of fibronectin secreted by myofibroblasts. We demonstrate that fibronectin via α5-integrin mediates peripheral nuclear positioning dependent on FAK and Src activation. Finally, we show that Cdc42, downstream of restricted fibronectin activation, is required for myofibril crosslinking but not myofibril contraction. Thus we identify that local activation of integrin by fibronectin secreted by myofibroblasts activates peripheral nuclear positioning in skeletal myofibers.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32-GM07062(United States)

Exit from Naive Pluripotency Induces a Transient X Chromosome Inactivation-like State in Males.

  • Sousa EJ
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2018 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

A hallmark of naive pluripotency is the presence of two active X chromosomes in females. It is not clear whether prevention of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is mediated by gene networks that preserve the naive state. Here, we show that robust naive pluripotent stem cell (nPSC) self-renewal represses expression of Xist, the master regulator of XCI. We found that nPSCs accumulate Xist on the male X chromosome and on both female X chromosomes as they become NANOG negative at the onset of differentiation. This is accompanied by the appearance of a repressive chromatin signature and partial X-linked gene silencing, suggesting a transient and rapid XCI-like state in male nPSCs. In the embryo, Xist is transiently expressed in males and in females from both X chromosomes at the onset of naive epiblast differentiation. In conclusion, we propose that XCI initiation is gender independent and triggered by destabilization of naive identity, suggesting that gender-specific mechanisms follow, rather than precede, XCI initiation.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - HL085036(United States)

Maintenance of Mouse Gustatory Terminal Field Organization is Dependent on BDNF at Adulthood.

  • Sun C
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jun 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

The rodent peripheral gustatory system is especially plastic during early postnatal development and maintains significant anatomical plasticity into adulthood. Thus, taste information carried from the tongue to the brain is built and maintained on a background of anatomical circuits that have the capacity to change throughout the animal's lifespan. Recently, the neurotrophin, Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), was shown to be required in the tongue to maintain normal levels of innervation in taste buds at adulthood, indicating that BDNF is a key molecule in the maintenance of nerve/target matching in taste buds. Here, we tested if maintenance of the central process of these gustatory nerves at adulthood also relies on BDNF by using male and female transgenic mice with inducible CreERT2 under the control of the Keratin 14 promoter or under control of the Ubiquitin promoter to remove Bdnf from the tongue or from all tissues, respectively. We found that the terminal fields of gustatory nerves in the nucleus of the solitary tract were expanded when Bdnf was removed from the tongue at adulthood, and with even larger and more widespread changes in mice where Bdnf was removed from all tissues. Removal of Bdnf did not affect numbers of ganglion cells that made up the nerves and did not affect peripheral, whole-nerve taste responses. We conclude that normal expression of Bdnf in gustatory structures is required to maintain normal levels of innervation at adulthood, and that the central effects of Bdnf removal are opposite of those in the tongue.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTBDNF plays a major role in the development and maintenance of proper innervation of taste buds. However, the importance of BDNF in maintaining innervation patterns of gustatory nerves into central targets has not been assessed. Here, we tested if Bdnf removal from the tongue or from all structures in adult mice impacts the maintenance of how taste nerves project to the first central relay. Deletion of Bdnf from the tongue and from all tissues led to a progressively greater expansion of terminal fields. This demonstrates, for the first time, that BDNF is necessary for the normal maintenance of central gustatory circuits at adulthood and further highlights a level of plasticity not seen in other sensory system subcortical circuits.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC000407(United States)
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC006938(United States)
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC007176(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS051305(United States)

Cerebellar learning properties are modulated by the CRF receptor in granular cells.

  • Ezra-Nevo G
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jun 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1) play an important role in the responses to stressful challenges. Despite the well-established expression of CRFR1 in granular cells (GrCs), its role in procedural motor performance and memory formation remains elusive. To investigate the role of CRFR1 expression in cerebellar GrCs, we used a mouse model depleted of CRFR1 in these cells. We detected changes in the cellular learning mechanisms in GrCs depleted of CRFR1 in that they showed changes in intrinsic excitability and long-term synaptic plasticity. Moreover, male mice depleted of CRFR1 specifically in GrCs showed accelerated Pavlovian associative eye-blink conditioning, but no differences in baseline motor performance, locomotion or fear and anxiety-related behaviors. Last, we analyzed cerebella transcriptome of KO and control mice and detected prominent alterations in the expression of calcium signaling pathways components. Our findings shed light on the interplay between stress-related central mechanisms and cerebellar motor conditioning, highlighting the role of the CRF system in regulating particular forms of cerebellar learning.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTAlthough it is known that CRFR1 is highly expressed in the cerebellum, little attention has been given to its role in cerebellar functions in the behaving animal. Moreover, most of the attention was directed to the effect of CRF on Purkinje cells at the cellular level, and to this date, almost no data exist on the role of this stress-related receptor in other cerebellar structures. Here, we explored the behavioral and cellular effect of GrCs specific ablation of CRFR1 We found a profound effect on learning, both at the cellular and behavioral levels, without affecting baseline motor skills.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - U01 CA105490(United States)

Hippocampal 5-HT Input Regulates Memory Formation and Schaffer Collateral Excitation.

  • Teixeira CM
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Jun 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

The efficacy and duration of memory storage is regulated by neuromodulatory transmitter actions. While the modulatory transmitter serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in implicit forms of memory in the invertebrate Aplysia, its function in explicit memory mediated by the mammalian hippocampus is less clear. Specifically, the consequences elicited by the spatio-temporal gradient of endogenous 5-HT release are not known. Here we applied optogenetic techniques in mice to gain insight into this fundamental biological process. We find that activation of serotonergic terminals in the hippocampal CA1 region both potentiates excitatory transmission at CA3-to-CA1 synapses and enhances spatial memory. Conversely, optogenetic silencing of CA1 5-HT terminals inhibits spatial memory. We furthermore find that synaptic potentiation is mediated by 5-HT4 receptors and that systemic modulation of 5-HT4 receptor function can bidirectionally impact memory formation. Collectively, these data reveal powerful modulatory influence of serotonergic synaptic input on hippocampal function and memory formation.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA-41223(United States)

Defects in the Alternative Splicing-Dependent Regulation of REST Cause Deafness.

  • Nakano Y
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jun 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

The DNA-binding protein REST forms complexes with histone deacetylases (HDACs) to repress neuronal genes in non-neuronal cells. In differentiating neurons, REST is downregulated predominantly by transcriptional silencing. Here we report that post-transcriptional inactivation of REST by alternative splicing is required for hearing in humans and mice. We show that, in the mechanosensory hair cells of the mouse ear, regulated alternative splicing of a frameshift-causing exon into the Rest mRNA is essential for the derepression of many neuronal genes. Heterozygous deletion of this alternative exon of mouse Rest causes hair cell degeneration and deafness, and the HDAC inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat) rescues the hearing of these mice. In humans, inhibition of the frameshifting splicing event by a novel REST variant is associated with dominantly inherited deafness. Our data reveal the necessity for alternative splicing-dependent regulation of REST in hair cells, and they identify a potential treatment for a group of hereditary deafness cases.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - 5 F32 MH064339-03(United States)

A Single-Cell Transcriptome Atlas of the Aging Drosophila Brain.

  • Davie K
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jun 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

The diversity of cell types and regulatory states in the brain, and how these change during aging, remains largely unknown. We present a single-cell transcriptome atlas of the entire adult Drosophila melanogaster brain sampled across its lifespan. Cell clustering identified 87 initial cell clusters that are further subclustered and validated by targeted cell-sorting. Our data show high granularity and identify a wide range of cell types. Gene network analyses using SCENIC revealed regulatory heterogeneity linked to energy consumption. During aging, RNA content declines exponentially without affecting neuronal identity in old brains. This single-cell brain atlas covers nearly all cells in the normal brain and provides the tools to study cellular diversity alongside other Drosophila and mammalian single-cell datasets in our unique single-cell analysis platform: SCope (http://scope.aertslab.org). These results, together with SCope, allow comprehensive exploration of all transcriptional states of an entire aging brain.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - G0600214(United Kingdom)

FRMD8 promotes inflammatory and growth factor signalling by stabilising the iRhom/ADAM17 sheddase complex.

  • Künzel U
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jun 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

Many intercellular signals are synthesised as transmembrane precursors that are released by proteolytic cleavage ('shedding') from the cell surface. ADAM17, a membrane-tethered metalloprotease, is the primary shedding enzyme responsible for the release of the inflammatory cytokine TNFα and several EGF receptor ligands. ADAM17 exists in complex with the rhomboid-like iRhom proteins, which act as cofactors that regulate ADAM17 substrate shedding. Here we report that the poorly characterised FERM domain-containing protein FRMD8 is a new component of the iRhom2/ADAM17 sheddase complex. FRMD8 binds to the cytoplasmic N-terminus of iRhoms and is necessary to stabilise iRhoms and ADAM17 at the cell surface. In the absence of FRMD8, iRhom2 and ADAM17 are degraded via the endolysosomal pathway, resulting in the reduction of ADAM17-mediated shedding. We have confirmed the pathophysiological significance of FRMD8 in iPSC-derived human macrophages and mouse tissues, thus demonstrating its role in the regulated release of multiple cytokine and growth factor signals.

Funding information:
  • Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds - PhD Fellowship()
  • Horizon 2020 Framework Programme - 659166()
  • Medical Research Council - 1374214()
  • Medical Research Council - MC_EX_MR/N50192X/1()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS054042(United States)
  • Wellcome - 101035/Z/13/Z()
  • Wellcome - Oxford Wellcome Institutional Strategic Support Fund 121302()

Activation of GPR55 increases neural stem cell proliferation and promotes early adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  • Hill JD
  • Br. J. Pharmacol.
  • 2018 Jun 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The cannabinoid system exerts functional regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and adult neurogenesis, yet not all effects of cannabinoid-like compounds seen can be attributed to the cannabinoid 1 (CB1 ) or CB2 receptor. The recently de-orphaned GPR55 has been shown to be activated by numerous cannabinoid ligands suggesting that GPR55 is a third cannabinoid receptor. Here, we examined the role of GPR55 activation in NSC proliferation and early adult neurogenesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: The effects of GPR55 agonists (LPI, O-1602, ML184) on human (h) NSC proliferation in vitro were assessed by flow cytometry. Human NSC differentiation was determined by flow cytometry, qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Immature neuron formation in the hippocampus of C57BL/6 and GPR55-/- mice was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. KEY RESULTS: Activation of GPR55 significantly increased proliferation rates of hNSCs in vitro. These effects were attenuated by ML193, a selective GPR55 antagonist. ML184 significantly promoted neuronal differentiation in vitro while ML193 reduced differentiation rates as compared to vehicle treatment. Continuous administration of O-1602 into the hippocampus via a cannula connected to an osmotic pump resulted in increased Ki67+ cells within the dentate gyrus. O-1602 increased immature neuron generation, as assessed by DCX+ and BrdU+ cells, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. GPR55-/- animals displayed reduced rates of proliferation and neurogenesis within the hippocampus while O-1602 had no effect as compared to vehicle controls. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Together, these findings suggest GPR55 activation as a novel target and strategy to regulate NSC proliferation and adult neurogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA 100707-12(United States)

Prostaglandin signaling governs spike timing-dependent plasticity at sensory synapses onto mouse spinal projection neurons.

  • Li J
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jun 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Highly correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic activity evokes spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) at primary afferent synapses onto spinal projection neurons. While prior evidence indicates that t-LTP depends upon an elevation in intracellular Ca2+ within projection neurons, the downstream signaling pathways that trigger the observed increase in glutamate release from sensory neurons remain poorly understood. Using in vitro patch clamp recordings from female mouse lamina I spino-parabrachial (PB) neurons, the present study demonstrates a critical role for prostaglandin synthesis in the generation of t-LTP. Bath application of the selective phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor AACOCF3 or the Cox-2 inhibitor nimesulide prevented t-LTP at sensory synapses onto spino-PB neurons. Similar results were observed following the block of the EP2 subtype of PGE2 receptor with PF 04418948. Meanwhile, perfusion with PGE2 or the EP2 agonist butaprost potentiated the amplitude of monosynaptic primary afferent-evoked EPSCs while decreasing the paired-pulse ratio, suggesting a presynaptic site of action. Cox-2 was constitutively expressed in both spinal microglia and lamina I projection neurons within the superficial dorsal horn (SDH). Suppression of microglial activation with minocycline had no effect on the production of t-LTP, suggesting the possibility that prostaglandins produced within projection neurons could contribute to an enhanced probability of glutamate release at primary afferent synapses. Collectively, the results suggest that the amplification of ascending nociceptive transmission by the spinal SDH network is governed by PLA2-Cox-2-PGE2 signaling.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTLong-term potentiation (LTP) of primary afferent synapses contributes to the sensitization of spinal nociceptive circuits and has been linked to greater pain sensation in humans. Prior work has implicated elevated glutamate release in the generation of spike timing-dependent LTP (t-LTP) at sensory synapses onto ascending spinal projection neurons, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we provide evidence that the activation of EP2 prostaglandin receptors by PGE2, occurring downstream of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) activation, mediates t-LTP at these synapses via changes in presynaptic function. This suggests that prostaglandins can increase the flow of nociceptive information from the spinal cord to the brain independently of their known ability to suppress synaptic inhibition within the dorsal horn.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - AG020686(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS080889(United States)

How Diverse Retinal Functions Arise from Feedback at the First Visual Synapse.

  • Drinnenberg A
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Jun 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Many brain regions contain local interneurons of distinct types. How does an interneuron type contribute to the input-output transformations of a given brain region? We addressed this question in the mouse retina by chemogenetically perturbing horizontal cells, an interneuron type providing feedback at the first visual synapse, while monitoring the light-driven spiking activity in thousands of ganglion cells, the retinal output neurons. We uncovered six reversible perturbation-induced effects in the response dynamics and response range of ganglion cells. The effects were enhancing or suppressive, occurred in different response epochs, and depended on the ganglion cell type. A computational model of the retinal circuitry reproduced all perturbation-induced effects and led us to assign specific functions to horizontal cells with respect to different ganglion cell types. Our combined experimental and theoretical work reveals how a single interneuron type can differentially shape the dynamical properties of distinct output channels of a brain region.

Funding information:
  • European Research Council - 233083(International)

The homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is a direct target of SoxC proteins during developmental vertebrate neurogenesis.

  • Jacob A
  • J. Neurochem.
  • 2018 May 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

The high-mobility-group-domain containing SoxC transcription factors Sox4 and Sox11 are expressed and required in the vertebrate central nervous system in neuronal precursors and neuroblasts. To identify genes that are widely regulated by SoxC proteins during vertebrate neurogenesis we generated expression profiles from developing mouse brain and chicken neural tube with reduced SoxC expression and found the transcription factor Prox1 strongly downregulated under both conditions. This led us to hypothesize that Prox1 expression depends on SoxC proteins in the developing central nervous system of mouse and chicken. By combining luciferase reporter assays and overexpression in the chicken neural tube with in vivo and in vitro binding studies, we identify the Prox1 gene promoter and two upstream enhancers at -44 kb and -40 kb relative to the transcription start as regulatory regions that are bound and activated by SoxC proteins. This argues that Prox1 is a direct target gene of SoxC proteins during neurogenesis. Electroporations in the chicken neural tube furthermore show that Prox1 activates a subset of SoxC target genes, whereas it has no effects on others. We propose that the transcriptional control of Prox1 by SoxC proteins may ensure coupling of two types of transcription factors that are both required during early neurogenesis, but have at least in part distinct functions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10 RR024615(United States)

Phosphatidylinositol-5-Phosphate 4-Kinases Regulate Cellular Lipid Metabolism By Facilitating Autophagy.

  • Lundquist MR
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

While the majority of phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate (PI-4, 5-P2) in mammalian cells is generated by the conversion of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI-4-P) to PI-4, 5-P2, a small fraction can be made by phosphorylating phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate (PI-5-P). The physiological relevance of this second pathway is not clear. Here, we show that deletion of the genes encoding the two most active enzymes in this pathway, Pip4k2a and Pip4k2b, in the liver of mice causes a large enrichment in lipid droplets and in autophagic vesicles during fasting. These changes are due to a defect in the clearance of autophagosomes that halts autophagy and reduces the supply of nutrients salvaged through this pathway. Similar defects in autophagy are seen in nutrient-starved Pip4k2a-/-Pip4k2b-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts and in C. elegans lacking the PI5P4K ortholog. These results suggest that this alternative pathway for PI-4, 5-P2 synthesis evolved, in part, to enhance the ability of multicellular organisms to survive starvation.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R35 CA197588()
  • NCI NIH HHS - U54 CA210184()
  • NCRR NIH HHS - UL1RR024128(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM041890()

Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of Lymph Node Stromal Cells Reveals Niche-Associated Heterogeneity.

  • Rodda LB
  • Immunity
  • 2018 May 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Stromal cells (SCs) establish the compartmentalization of lymphoid tissues critical to the immune response. However, the full diversity of lymph node (LN) SCs remains undefined. Using droplet-based single-cell RNA sequencing, we identified nine peripheral LN non-endothelial SC clusters. Included are the established subsets, Ccl19hi T-zone reticular cells (TRCs), marginal reticular cells, follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), and perivascular cells. We also identified Ccl19lo TRCs, likely including cholesterol-25-hydroxylase+ cells located at the T-zone perimeter, Cxcl9+ TRCs in the T-zone and interfollicular region, CD34+ SCs in the capsule and medullary vessel adventitia, indolethylamine N-methyltransferase+ SCs in the medullary cords, and Nr4a1+ SCs in several niches. These data help define how transcriptionally distinct LN SCs support niche-restricted immune functions and provide evidence that many SCs are in an activated state.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS025044(United States)

Nav1.1-Overexpressing Interneuron Transplants Restore Brain Rhythms and Cognition in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

  • Martinez-Losa M
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Apr 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Inhibitory interneurons regulate the oscillatory rhythms and network synchrony that are required for cognitive functions and disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Network dysrhythmias in AD and multiple neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with hypofunction of Nav1.1, a voltage-gated sodium channel subunit predominantly expressed in interneurons. We show that Nav1.1-overexpressing, but not wild-type, interneuron transplants derived from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) enhance behavior-dependent gamma oscillatory activity, reduce network hypersynchrony, and improve cognitive functions in human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP)-transgenic mice, which simulate key aspects of AD. Increased Nav1.1 levels accelerated action potential kinetics of transplanted fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking interneurons. Nav1.1-deficient interneuron transplants were sufficient to cause behavioral abnormalities in wild-type mice. We conclude that the efficacy of interneuron transplantation and the function of transplanted cells in an AD-relevant context depend on their Nav1.1 levels. Disease-specific molecular optimization of cell transplants may be required to ensure therapeutic benefits in different conditions.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - C06 RR018928()
  • NIA NIH HHS - F32 AG043301()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG030207()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG036884()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG047313()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG051390()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG054214()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI059738-05(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - P30 NS065780()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS041787()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - U54 NS100717()

AIDA Selectively Mediates Downregulation of Fat Synthesis Enzymes by ERAD to Retard Intestinal Fat Absorption and Prevent Obesity.

  • Luo H
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Apr 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

The efficiency of intestinal absorption of dietary fat constitutes a primary determinant accounting for individual vulnerability to obesity. However, how fat absorption is controlled and contributes to obesity remains unclear. Here, we show that inhibition of endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) increases the abundance of triacylglycerol synthesis enzymes and fat absorption in small intestine. The C2-domain protein AIDA acts as an essential factor for the E3-ligase HRD1 of ERAD to downregulate rate-limiting acyltransferases GPAT3, MOGAT2, and DGAT2. Aida-/- mice, when grown in a thermal-neutral condition or fed high-fat diet, display increased intestinal fatty acid re-esterification, circulating and tissue triacylglycerol, accompanied with severely increased adiposity without enhancement of adipogenesis. Intestine-specific knockout of Aida largely phenocopies its whole-body knockout, strongly indicating that increased intestinal TAG synthesis is a primary impetus to obesity. The AIDA-mediated ERAD system may thus represent an anti-thrifty mechanism impinging on the enzymes for intestinal fat absorption and systemic fat storage.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA064140(United States)

Systematic Characterization of Stress-Induced RNA Granulation.

  • Namkoong S
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Apr 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Upon stress, cytoplasmic mRNA is sequestered to insoluble ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules, such as the stress granule (SG). Partially due to the belief that translationally suppressed mRNAs are recruited to SGs in bulk, stress-induced dynamic redistribution of mRNA has not been thoroughly characterized. Here, we report that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress targets only a small subset of translationally suppressed mRNAs into the insoluble RNP granule fraction (RG). This subset, characterized by extended length and adenylate-uridylate (AU)-rich motifs, is highly enriched with genes critical for cell survival and proliferation. This pattern of RG targeting was conserved for two other stress types, heat shock and arsenite toxicity, which induce distinct responses in the total cytoplasmic transcriptome. Nevertheless, stress-specific RG-targeting motifs, such as guanylate-cytidylate (GC)-rich motifs in heat shock, were also identified. Previously underappreciated, transcriptome profiling in the RG may contribute to understanding human diseases associated with RNP dysfunction, such as cancer and neurodegeneration.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI043477(United States)

Kir4.1-Dependent Astrocyte-Fast Motor Neuron Interactions Are Required for Peak Strength.

  • Kelley KW
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Apr 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Diversified neurons are essential for sensorimotor function, but whether astrocytes become specialized to optimize circuit performance remains unclear. Large fast α-motor neurons (FαMNs) of spinal cord innervate fast-twitch muscles that generate peak strength. We report that ventral horn astrocytes express the inward-rectifying K+ channel Kir4.1 (a.k.a. Kcnj10) around MNs in a VGLUT1-dependent manner. Loss of astrocyte-encoded Kir4.1 selectively altered FαMN size and function and led to reduced peak strength. Overexpression of Kir4.1 in astrocytes was sufficient to increase MN size through activation of the PI3K/mTOR/pS6 pathway. Kir4.1 was downregulated cell autonomously in astrocytes derived from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with SOD1 mutation. However, astrocyte Kir4.1 was dispensable for FαMN survival even in the mutant SOD1 background. These findings show that astrocyte Kir4.1 is essential for maintenance of peak strength and suggest that Kir4.1 downregulation might uncouple symptoms of muscle weakness from MN cell death in diseases like ALS.

Funding information:
  • FIC NIH HHS - K01 TW000001(United States)

Reduction of intracerebral hemorrhage by rivaroxaban after tPA thrombolysis is associated with downregulation of PAR-1 and PAR-2.

  • Morihara R
  • J. Neurosci. Res.
  • 2018 Apr 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

This study aimed to assess the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment in rivaroxaban compared with warfarin-pretreated male Wistar rat brain after ischemia in relation to activation profiles of protease-activated receptor-1, -2, -3, and -4 (PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4). After pretreatment with warfarin (0.2 mg/kg/day), low-dose rivaroxaban (60 mg/kg/day), high-dose rivaroxaban (120 mg/kg/day), or vehicle for 14 days, transient middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced for 90 min, followed by reperfusion with tPA (10 mg/kg/10 ml). Infarct volume, hemorrhagic volume, immunoglobulin G leakage, and blood parameters were examined. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, immunohistochemistry for PARs was performed in brain sections. ICH volume was increased in the warfarin-pretreated group compared with the rivaroxaban-treated group. PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 were widely expressed in the normal brain, and their levels were increased in the ischemic brain, especially in the peri-ischemic lesion. Warfarin pretreatment enhanced the expression of PAR-1 and PAR-2 in the peri-ischemic lesion, whereas rivaroxaban pretreatment did not. The present study shows a lower risk of brain hemorrhage in rivaroxaban-pretreated compared with warfarin-pretreated rats following tPA administration to the ischemic brain. It is suggested that the relative downregulation of PAR-1 and PAR-2 by rivaroxaban compared with warfarin pretreatment might be partly involved in the mechanism of reduced hemorrhagic complications in patients receiving rivaroxaban in clinical trials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Hippo Signaling Plays an Essential Role in Cell State Transitions during Cardiac Fibroblast Development.

  • Xiao Y
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Apr 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

During development, progenitors progress through transition states. The cardiac epicardium contains progenitors of essential non-cardiomyocytes. The Hippo pathway, a kinase cascade that inhibits the Yap transcriptional co-factor, controls organ size in developing hearts. Here, we investigated Hippo kinases Lats1 and Lats2 in epicardial diversification. Epicardial-specific deletion of Lats1/2 was embryonic lethal, and mutant embryos had defective coronary vasculature remodeling. Single-cell RNA sequencing revealed that Lats1/2 mutant cells failed to activate fibroblast differentiation but remained in an intermediate cell state with both epicardial and fibroblast characteristics. Lats1/2 mutant cells displayed an arrested developmental trajectory with persistence of epicardial markers and expanded expression of Yap targets Dhrs3, an inhibitor of retinoic acid synthesis, and Dpp4, a protease that modulates extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Genetic and pharmacologic manipulation revealed that Yap inhibits fibroblast differentiation, prolonging a subepicardial-like cell state, and promotes expression of matricellular factors, such as Dpp4, that define ECM characteristics.

Funding information:
  • NIAAA NIH HHS - R01 AA020401(United States)

Cancer-Germline Antigen Expression Discriminates Clinical Outcome to CTLA-4 Blockade.

  • Shukla SA
  • Cell
  • 2018 Apr 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

CTLA-4 immune checkpoint blockade is clinically effective in a subset of patients with metastatic melanoma. We identify a subcluster of MAGE-A cancer-germline antigens, located within a narrow 75 kb region of chromosome Xq28, that predicts resistance uniquely to blockade of CTLA-4, but not PD-1. We validate this gene expression signature in an independent anti-CTLA-4-treated cohort and show its specificity to the CTLA-4 pathway with two independent anti-PD-1-treated cohorts. Autophagy, a process critical for optimal anti-cancer immunity, has previously been shown to be suppressed by the MAGE-TRIM28 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. We now show that the expression of the key autophagosome component LC3B and other activators of autophagy are negatively associated with MAGE-A protein levels in human melanomas, including samples from patients with resistance to CTLA-4 blockade. Our findings implicate autophagy suppression in resistance to CTLA-4 blockade in melanoma, suggesting exploitation of autophagy induction for potential therapeutic synergy with CTLA-4 inhibitors.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - K12HD00849(United States)

Generation of 3 spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell lines LUMCi002-A, B, and C and 2 unaffected sibling control induced pluripotent stem cell lines LUMCi003-A and B.

  • Buijsen RAM
  • Stem Cell Res
  • 2018 Apr 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 8 of the ATXN1 gene. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from a SCA1 patient and his non-affected sister by using non-integrating Sendai Viruses (SeV). The resulting hiPSCs are SeVfree, express pluripotency markers, display a normal karyotype, retain the mutation (length of the CAG repeat expansion in the ATXN1 gene) and are able to differentiate into the three germ layers in vitro.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - T32 AI007638-09(United States)

Immunohistochemical Procedures for Characterizing the Retinal Expression Patterns of Cre Driver Mouse Lines.

  • Lu Q
  • Methods Mol. Biol.
  • 2018 Apr 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

The retina is a thin neural tissue sitting on the backside of the eye, composed of light-sensing cells, interneurons, and output ganglion neurons. The latter send electrical signals to higher visual centers in the brain. Transgenic mouse lines are becoming one of the most valuable mammalian animal models for the study of visual signal processing within the retina. Especially, the generation of Cre recombinase transgenic mouse lines provides a powerful tool for genetic manipulation. A key step for the utilization of transgenic lines is the characterization of their transgene expression patterns in the retina. Here we describe a standard protocol for characterizing the expression pattern of the Cre recombinase or fluorescent proteins in the retina with an immunohistochemical approach.

Insm1 Induces Neural Progenitor Delamination in Developing Neocortex via Downregulation of the Adherens Junction Belt-Specific Protein Plekha7.

  • Tavano S
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Mar 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Delamination of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from the ventricular surface is a crucial prerequisite to form the subventricular zone, the germinal layer linked to the expansion of the mammalian neocortex in development and evolution. Here, we dissect the molecular mechanism by which the transcription factor Insm1 promotes the generation of basal progenitors (BPs). Insm1 protein is most highly expressed in newborn BPs in mouse and human developing neocortex. Forced Insm1 expression in embryonic mouse neocortex causes NPC delamination, converting apical to basal radial glia. Insm1 represses the expression of the apical adherens junction belt-specific protein Plekha7. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of Plekha7 expression suffices to cause NPC delamination. Plekha7 overexpression impedes the intrinsic and counteracts the Insm1-induced, NPC delamination. Our findings uncover a novel molecular mechanism underlying NPC delamination in which a BP-genic transcription factor specifically targets the integrity of the apical adherens junction belt, rather than adherens junction components as such.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA BC010763-05(United States)

Generation of a luciferase-expressing human embryonic stem cell line: NERCe002-A-2.

  • Peng Y
  • Stem Cell Res
  • 2018 Mar 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

The human embryonic stem cell line NERCe002-A-2 was generated by transduction of NERCe002-A cells with an expression vector carrying the luciferase gene. The stem cells labelled with luciferase can be transplanted into animals and detected by the bioluminescence imaging technology. This provides optimal prospects of application to in vivo stem cell tracing. Luciferin served as a substrate to detect the activity of luciferase, and luciferase expression was measured by quantitative PCR. Characterization assays suggested that the NERCe002-A-2 cell line expresses typical markers of pluripotency and can form the 3 germ layers in vivo.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - (United States)

Spatial-Temporal Lineage Restrictions of Embryonic p63+ Progenitors Establish Distinct Stem Cell Pools in Adult Airways.

  • Yang Y
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Mar 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Basal cells (BCs) are p63-expressing multipotent progenitors of skin, tracheoesophageal and urinary tracts. p63 is abundant in developing airways; however, it remains largely unclear how embryonic p63+ cells contribute to the developing and postnatal respiratory tract epithelium, and ultimately how they relate to adult BCs. Using lineage-tracing and functional approaches in vivo, we show that p63+ cells arising from the lung primordium are initially multipotent progenitors of airway and alveolar lineages but later become restricted proximally to generate the tracheal adult stem cell pool. In intrapulmonary airways, these cells are maintained immature to adulthood in bronchi, establishing a rare p63+Krt5- progenitor cell population that responds to H1N1 virus-induced severe injury. Intriguingly, this pool includes a CC10 lineage-labeled p63+Krt5- cell subpopulation required for a full H1N1-response. These data elucidate key aspects in the establishment of regionally distinct adult stem cell pools in the respiratory system, potentially with relevance to other organs.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA HL006151-02(United States)
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA112403()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA193455()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R35 HL135834()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - HHSN272201400008C()

Developmental History Provides a Roadmap for the Emergence of Tumor Plasticity.

  • Tata PR
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Mar 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

We show that the loss or gain of transcription factor programs that govern embryonic cell-fate specification is associated with a form of tumor plasticity characterized by the acquisition of alternative cell fates normally characteristic of adjacent organs. In human non-small cell lung cancers, downregulation of the lung lineage-specifying TF NKX2-1 is associated with tumors bearing features of various gut tissues. Loss of Nkx2-1 from murine alveolar, but not airway, epithelium results in conversion of lung cells to gastric-like cells. Superimposing oncogenic Kras activation enables further plasticity in both alveolar and airway epithelium, producing tumors that adopt midgut and hindgut fates. Conversely, coupling Nkx2-1 loss with foregut lineage-specifying SOX2 overexpression drives the formation of squamous cancers with features of esophageal differentiation. These findings demonstrate that elements of pathologic tumor plasticity mirror the normal developmental history of organs in that cancer cells acquire cell fates associated with developmentally related neighboring organs.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01CA172025(United States)
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - K99 HL127181()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - P30 HL101287()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R00 HL127181()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL118185()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007205()

Establishment and characterization of a human embryonic stem cell line, NERCe002-A-3, with inducible 14-3-3ζ overexpression.

  • He J
  • Stem Cell Res
  • 2018 Feb 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

NERCe002-A-3 cells were generated from the normal human embryonic stem cell line NERCe002-A. NERCe002-A-3 cells overexpressed 14-3-3ζ after exposure to doxycycline. 14-3-3ζ protein have the ability to bind a multitude of functionally diverse signalling proteins. The NERCe002-A-3 cell line is considered a model for functional studies of the 14-3-3ζ protein in hESC self-renewal and cell differentiation. Doxycycline-treated NERCe002-A-3 cells showed a>27-fold increase in relative expression of 14-3-3ζ as compared with un-induced cells. Characterization assays proved that NERCe002-A-3 cells express typical markers of pluripotency and have the ability to form the three germ layers in vivo.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - T32AI60573(United States)

Opposing expression gradients of calcitonin-related polypeptide alpha (Calca/Cgrpα) and tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) in type II afferent neurons of the mouse cochlea.

  • Wu JS
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Feb 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Type II spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are small caliber, unmyelinated afferents that extend dendritic arbors hundreds of microns along the cochlear spiral, contacting many outer hair cells (OHCs). Despite these many contacts, type II afferents are insensitive to sound and only weakly depolarized by glutamate release from OHCs. Recent studies suggest that type II afferents may be cochlear nociceptors, and can be excited by ATP released during tissue damage, by analogy to somatic pain-sensing C-fibers. The present work compares the expression patterns among cochlear type II afferents of two genes found in C-fibers: calcitonin-related polypeptide alpha (Calca/Cgrpα), specific to pain-sensing C-fibers, and tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), specific to low-threshold mechanoreceptive C-fibers, which was shown previously to be a selective biomarker of type II versus type I cochlear afferents (Vyas et al., ). Whole-mount cochlear preparations from 3-week- to 2-month-old CGRPα-EGFP (GENSAT) mice showed expression of Cgrpα in a subset of SGNs with type II-like peripheral dendrites extending beneath OHCs. Double labeling with other molecular markers confirmed that the labeled SGNs were neither type I SGNs nor olivocochlear efferents. Cgrpα starts to express in type II SGNs before hearing onset, but the expression level declines in the adult. The expression patterns of Cgrpα and Th formed opposing gradients, with Th being preferentially expressed in apical and Cgrpα in basal type II afferent neurons, indicating heterogeneity among type II afferent neurons. The expression of Th and Cgrpα was not mutually exclusive and co-expression could be observed, most abundantly in the middle cochlear turn.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC006476()
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC011741()
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC012957()

Generation of a human embryonic stem cell line, NERCe003-A-1, with lentivirus vector-mediated inducible CTNNB1 overexpression.

  • Wang Y
  • Stem Cell Res
  • 2018 Feb 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

The human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line NERCe003-A-1 was generated by introducing lentiviral-vector-mediated tetracycline-inducible β-catenin expression into a normal hESC line, NERCe003-A. The resulting cell line can overexpress the β-catenin protein, encoded by the CTNNB1 gene, after exposure to doxycycline (Dox). CTNNB1 gene expression was confirmed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and immunofluorescence assays. Further characterization confirmed that the NERCe003-A-1 cell line expresses typical pluripotency markers and has the ability to form the three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - A12788(United Kingdom)

Derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cell line (HUSTi001-A) from a 40-year-old patient with idiopathic infertility.

  • Fang F
  • Stem Cell Res
  • 2018 Feb 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Human fibroblasts were isolated from foreskin of a clinically diagnosed 40-year old patient with idiopathic infertility. The fibroblasts were reprogrammed with the Yamanaka KOSM transcriptional factors using the retroviral vectors. The obtained induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line showed pluripotency verified by the expression of pluripotency markers, NANOG, SOX2, OCT4, TRA-1-60, and SSEA-4. And the iPSC line was demonstrated to have the three germ layers differentiation capacity in vivo by teratoma assay. The iPSC line also showed normal karyotype. This patient-specific iPSC line can be used to explore the mechanism for idiopathic male infertility.

Funding information:
  • Cancer Research UK - 11832(United Kingdom)

Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Suppresses Synapse Formation in the Hippocampus of Male Rats via Inhibition of CXCL5 Secretion by Glia.

  • Zhang Y
  • Endocrinology
  • 2018 Feb 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is believed to play a critical role in stress-induced synaptic formation and modification. In the current study, we explored the mechanisms underlying CRH modulation of synaptic formation in the hippocampus by using various models in vitro. In cultured hippocampal slices, CRH treatment decreased synapsin I and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) levels via CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1). In isolated hippocampal neurons, however, it increased synapsin I-labeled presynaptic terminals and PSD95-labeled postsynaptic terminals via CRHR1. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of CRH on synapsin I-labeled and PSD95-labeled terminals occurred in the model of neuron-glia cocultures. These effects were prevented by CRHR1 antagonist. Moreover, treatment of the neurons with the media of CRH-treated glia led to a decrease in synaptic terminal formation. The media collected from CRH-treated glial cells with CRHR1 knockdown did not show an inhibitory effect on synaptic terminals in hippocampal neurons. Unbiased cytokine array coupled with confirmatory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that CRH suppressed C-X-C motif chemokine 5 (CXCL5) production in glia via CRHR1. Administration of CXCL5 reversed the inhibitory effects of CRH-treated glia culture media on synaptic formation. Our data suggest that CRH suppresses synapse formation through inhibition of CXCL5 secretion from glia in the hippocampus. Our study indicates that glia-neuron intercommunication is one of the mechanisms responsible for neuronal circuit remodeling during stress.

Immune or Genetic-Mediated Disruption of CASPR2 Causes Pain Hypersensitivity Due to Enhanced Primary Afferent Excitability.

  • Dawes JM
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Feb 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Human autoantibodies to contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2) are often associated with neuropathic pain, and CASPR2 mutations have been linked to autism spectrum disorders, in which sensory dysfunction is increasingly recognized. Human CASPR2 autoantibodies, when injected into mice, were peripherally restricted and resulted in mechanical pain-related hypersensitivity in the absence of neural injury. We therefore investigated the mechanism by which CASPR2 modulates nociceptive function. Mice lacking CASPR2 (Cntnap2-/-) demonstrated enhanced pain-related hypersensitivity to noxious mechanical stimuli, heat, and algogens. Both primary afferent excitability and subsequent nociceptive transmission within the dorsal horn were increased in Cntnap2-/- mice. Either immune or genetic-mediated ablation of CASPR2 enhanced the excitability of DRG neurons in a cell-autonomous fashion through regulation of Kv1 channel expression at the soma membrane. This is the first example of passive transfer of an autoimmune peripheral neuropathic pain disorder and demonstrates that CASPR2 has a key role in regulating cell-intrinsic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron excitability.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS18400(United States)

Subcellular Localization and Activity of TRPM4 in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Layer 2/3.

  • Riquelme D
  • Front Cell Neurosci
  • 2018 Feb 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel that conducts monovalent cations. TRPM4 has been proposed to contribute to burst firing and sustained activity in several brain regions, however, the cellular and subcellular pattern of TRPM4 expression in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during postnatal development has not been elucidated. Here, we use multiplex immunofluorescence labeling of brain sections to characterize the postnatal developmental expression of TRPM4 in the mouse mPFC. We also performed electrophysiological recordings to correlate the expression of TRPM4 immunoreactivity with the presence of TRPM4-like currents. We found that TRPM4 is expressed from the first postnatal day, with expression increasing up to postnatal day 35. Additionally, in perforated patch clamp experiments, we found that TRPM4-like currents were active at resting membrane potentials at all postnatal ages studied. Moreover, TRPM4 is expressed in both pyramidal neurons and interneurons. TRPM4 expression is localized in the soma and proximal dendrites, but not in the axon initial segment of pyramidal neurons. This subcellular localization is consistent with a reduction in the basal current only when we locally perfused 9-Phenanthrol in the soma, but not upon perfusion in the medial or distal dendrites. Our results show a specific localization of TRPM4 expression in neurons in the mPFC and that a 9-Phenanthrol sensitive current is active at resting membrane potential, suggesting specific functional roles in mPFC neurons during postnatal development and in adulthood.

Funding information:
  • European Research Council - 281967(International)

Neuronal PTEN deletion in adult cortical neurons triggers progressive growth of cell bodies, dendrites, and axons.

  • Gallent EA
  • Exp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Jan 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Deletion of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) gene in neonatal mice leads to enlargement of the cell bodies of cortical motoneurons (CMNs) in adulthood (Gutilla et al., 2016). Here, we assessed whether PTEN deletion in adult mice would trigger growth of mature neurons. PTEN was deleted by injecting AAV-Cre into the sensorimotor cortex of adult transgenic mice with a lox-P flanked exon 5 of the PTEN gene and Cre-dependent reporter gene tdTomato. PTEN-deleted CMN's identified by tdT expression and retrograde labeling with fluorogold (FG) were significantly enlarged four months following PTEN deletion, and continued to increase in size through the latest time intervals examined (12-15 months post-deletion). Sholl analyses of tdT-positive pyramidal neurons revealed increases in dendritic branches at 6 months following adult PTEN deletion, and greater increases at 12 months. 12 months after adult PTEN deletion, axons in the medullary pyramids were significantly larger and G-ratios were higher. Mice with PTEN deletion exhibited no overt neurological symptoms and no seizures. Assessment of motor function on the rotarod and cylinder test revealed slight impairment of coordination with unilateral deletion; however, mice with bilateral PTEN deletion in the motor cortex performed better than controls on the rotarod at 8 and 10 months post-deletion. Our findings demonstrate that robust neuronal growth can be induced in fully mature cortical neurons long after the developmental period has ended and that this continuous growth occurs without obvious functional impairments.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM049650(United States)

A critical period for the trophic actions of leptin on AgRP neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

  • Kamitakahara A
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Jan 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the developing hypothalamus, the fat-derived hormone leptin stimulates the growth of axons from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) to other regions that control energy balance. These projections are significantly reduced in leptin deficient (Lepob/ob ) mice and this phenotype is largely rescued by neonatal leptin treatments. However, treatment of mature Lepob/ob mice is ineffective, suggesting that the trophic action of leptin is limited to a developmental critical period. To temporally delineate closure of this critical period for leptin-stimulated growth, we treated Lepob/ob mice with exogenous leptin during a variety of discrete time periods, and measured the density of Agouti-Related Peptide (AgRP) containing projections from the ARH to the ventral part of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMHv), and to the medial parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus (PVHmp). The results indicate that leptin loses its neurotrophic potential at or near postnatal day 28. The duration of leptin exposure appears to be important, with 9- or 11-day treatments found to be more effective than shorter (5-day) treatments. Furthermore, leptin treatment for 9 days or more was sufficient to restore AgRP innervation to both the PVHmp and DMHv in Lepob/ob females, but only to the DMHv in Lepob/ob males. Together, these findings reveal that the trophic actions of leptin are contingent upon timing and duration of leptin exposure, display both target and sex specificity, and that modulation of leptin-dependent circuit formation by each of these factors may carry enduring consequences for feeding behavior, metabolism, and obesity risk.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01 CA073992(United States)

Long-Range Signaling Activation and Local Inhibition Separate the Mesoderm and Endoderm Lineages.

  • van Boxtel AL
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Jan 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Specification of the three germ layers by graded Nodal signaling has long been seen as a paradigm for patterning through a single morphogen gradient. However, by exploiting the unique properties of the zebrafish embryo to capture the dynamics of signaling and cell fate allocation, we now demonstrate that Nodal functions in an incoherent feedforward loop, together with Fgf, to determine the pattern of endoderm and mesoderm specification. We show that Nodal induces long-range Fgf signaling while simultaneously inducing the cell-autonomous Fgf signaling inhibitor Dusp4 within the first two cell tiers from the margin. The consequent attenuation of Fgf signaling in these cells allows specification of endoderm progenitors, while the cells further from the margin, which receive Nodal and/or Fgf signaling, are specified as mesoderm. This elegant model demonstrates the necessity of feedforward and feedback interactions between multiple signaling pathways for providing cells with temporal and positional information.

Funding information:
  • NLM NIH HHS - 5T15LM007359(United States)

Spatial Information in a Non-retinotopic Visual Cortex.

  • Fournier J
  • Neuron
  • 2018 Jan 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Turtle dorsal cortex (dCx), a three-layered cortical area of the reptilian telencephalon, receives inputs from the retina via the thalamic lateral geniculate nucleus and constitutes the first cortical stage of visual processing. The receptive fields of dCx neurons usually occupy the entire contralateral visual field. Electrophysiological recordings in awake and anesthetized animals reveal that dCx is sensitive to the spatial structure of natural images, that dCx receptive fields are not entirely uniform across space, and that adaptation to repeated stimulation is position specific. Hence, spatial information can be found both at the single-neuron and population scales. Anatomical data are consistent with the absence of a clear retinotopic mapping of thalamocortical projections. The mapping and representation of visual space in this three-layered cortex thus differ from those found in mammalian primary visual cortex. Our results support the notion that dCx performs a global, rather than local, analysis of the visual scene.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P50 CA127003(United States)

Bcl-xL dependency coincides with the onset of neurogenesis in the developing mammalian spinal cord.

  • Fogarty LC
  • Mol. Cell. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jan 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

The bcl-2 family of survival and death promoting proteins play a key role in regulating cell numbers during nervous system development. Bcl-xL, an anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family member is highly expressed in the developing nervous system. However; the early embryonic lethality of the bcl-x germline null mouse precluded an investigation into its role in nervous system development. To identify the role of bcl-x in spinal cord neurogenesis, we generated a central nervous system-specific bcl-x conditional knockout (BKO) mouse. Apoptotic cell death in the BKO embryo was initially detected at embryonic day 11 (E11) in the ventrolateral aspect of the spinal cord corresponding to the location of motor neurons. Apoptosis reached its peak at E13 having spread across the ventral and into the dorsal spinal cord. By E18, the wave of apoptosis had passed and only a few apoptotic cells were observed. The duration and direction of spread of apoptosis across the spinal cord is consistent with the spatial and temporal sequence of neuronal differentiation. Motor neurons, the first neurons to become post mitotic in the spinal cord, were also the first apoptotic cells. As neurogenesis spread across the spinal cord, later born neuronal populations such as Lim2+ interneurons were also affected. The onset of apoptosis occurred in cells that had exited the cell cycle within the previous 24h and initiated neural differentiation as demonstrated by BrdU birthdating and βIII tubulin immunohistochemistry. This data demonstrates that spinal cord neurons become Bcl-xL dependent at an early post mitotic stage in developmental neurogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI074847(United States)

Selenium Utilization by GPX4 Is Required to Prevent Hydroperoxide-Induced Ferroptosis.

  • Ingold I
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jan 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Selenoproteins are rare proteins among all kingdoms of life containing the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Selenocysteine resembles cysteine, differing only by the substitution of selenium for sulfur. Yet the actual advantage of selenolate- versus thiolate-based catalysis has remained enigmatic, as most of the known selenoproteins also exist as cysteine-containing homologs. Here, we demonstrate that selenolate-based catalysis of the essential mammalian selenoprotein GPX4 is unexpectedly dispensable for normal embryogenesis. Yet the survival of a specific type of interneurons emerges to exclusively depend on selenocysteine-containing GPX4, thereby preventing fatal epileptic seizures. Mechanistically, selenocysteine utilization by GPX4 confers exquisite resistance to irreversible overoxidation as cells expressing a cysteine variant are highly sensitive toward peroxide-induced ferroptosis. Remarkably, concomitant deletion of all selenoproteins in Gpx4cys/cys cells revealed that selenoproteins are dispensable for cell viability provided partial GPX4 activity is retained. Conclusively, 200 years after its discovery, a specific and indispensable role for selenium is provided.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM058888(United States)

Organization of alpha-transducin immunoreactive system in the brain and retina of larval and young adult Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), and their relationship with other neural systems.

  • Barreiro-Iglesias A
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2017 Dec 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

We employed an anti-transducin antibody (Gαt-S), in combination with other markers, to characterize the Gαt-S-immunoreactive (ir) system in the CNS of the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus. Gαt-S immunoreactivity was observed in some neuronal populations and numerous fibers distributed throughout the brain. Double Gαt-S- and opsin-ir neurons (putative photoreceptors) are distributed in the hypothalamus (postoptic commissure nucleus, dorsal and ventral hypothalamus) and caudal diencephalon, confirming results of García-Fernández et al. (Cell and Tissue Research, 288, 267-278, 1997). Singly Gαt-S-ir cells were observed in the midbrain and hindbrain, increasing the known populations. Our results reveal for the first time in vertebrates the extensive innervation of many brain regions and the spinal cord by Gαt-S-ir fibers. The Gαt-S innervation of the habenula is very selective, fibers densely innervating the lamprey homologue of the mammalian medial nucleus (Stephenson-Jones et al., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109, E164-E173, 2012), but not the lateral nucleus homologue. The lamprey neurohypophysis was not innervated by Gαt-S-ir fibers. We also analyzed by double immunofluorescence the relation of this system with other systems. A dopaminergic marker (TH), serotonin (5-HT) or GABA do not co-localize with Gαt-S-ir neurons although codistribution of fibers was observed. Codistribution of Gαt-S-ir fibers and isolectin-labeled extrabulbar primary olfactory fibers was observed in the striatum and hypothalamus. Neurobiotin retrograde transport from the spinal cord combined with immunofluorescence revealed spinal-projecting Gαt-S-ir reticular neurons in the caudal hindbrain. Present results in an ancient vertebrate reveal for the first time a collection of brain targets of Gαt-S-ir neurons, suggesting they might mediate non-visual modulation by light in many systems.

Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 regulates myoblast proliferation and controls muscle fiber length.

  • Lee JK
  • Elife
  • 2017 Dec 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

Muscle fiber length is nearly uniform within a muscle but widely different among different muscles. We show that Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase 2 (Abl2) has a key role in regulating myofiber length, as a loss of Abl2 leads to excessively long myofibers in the diaphragm, intercostal and levator auris muscles but not limb muscles. Increased myofiber length is caused by enhanced myoblast proliferation, expanding the pool of myoblasts and leading to increased myoblast fusion. Abl2 acts in myoblasts, but as a consequence of expansion of the diaphragm muscle, the diaphragm central tendon is reduced in size, likely contributing to reduced stamina of Abl2 mutant mice. Ectopic muscle islands, each composed of myofibers of uniform length and orientation, form within the central tendon of Abl2+/- mice. Specialized tendon cells, resembling tendon cells at myotendinous junctions, form at the ends of these muscle islands, suggesting that myofibers induce differentiation of tendon cells, which reciprocally regulate myofiber length and orientation.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01DK080805(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS036193()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS075124()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R37 NS036193()

Zebrafish Regulatory T Cells Mediate Organ-Specific Regenerative Programs.

  • Hui SP
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Dec 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

The attenuation of ancestral pro-regenerative pathways may explain why humans do not efficiently regenerate damaged organs. Vertebrate lineages that exhibit robust regeneration, including the teleost zebrafish, provide insights into the maintenance of adult regenerative capacity. Using established models of spinal cord, heart, and retina regeneration, we discovered that zebrafish Treg-like (zTreg) cells rapidly homed to damaged organs. Conditional ablation of zTreg cells blocked organ regeneration by impairing precursor cell proliferation. In addition to modulating inflammation, infiltrating zTreg cells stimulated regeneration through interleukin-10-independent secretion of organ-specific regenerative factors (Ntf3: spinal cord; Nrg1: heart; Igf1: retina). Recombinant regeneration factors rescued the regeneration defects associated with zTreg cell depletion, whereas Foxp3a-deficient zTreg cells infiltrated damaged organs but failed to express regenerative factors. Our data delineate organ-specific roles for Treg cells in maintaining pro-regenerative capacity that could potentially be harnessed for diverse regenerative therapies.

Funding information:
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - ES016005(United States)

Abrogated Freud-1/Cc2d1a Repression of 5-HT1A Autoreceptors Induces Fluoxetine-Resistant Anxiety/Depression-Like Behavior.

  • Vahid-Ansari F
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Dec 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Freud-1/Cc2d1a represses the gene transcription of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, which negatively regulate 5-HT tone. To test the role of Freud-1 in vivo, we generated mice with adulthood conditional knock-out of Freud-1 in 5-HT neurons (cF1ko). In cF1ko mice, 5-HT1A autoreceptor protein, binding and hypothermia response were increased, with reduced 5-HT content and neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe. The cF1ko mice displayed increased anxiety- and depression-like behavior that was resistant to chronic antidepressant (fluoxetine) treatment. Using conditional Freud-1/5-HT1A double knock-out (cF1/1A dko) to disrupt both Freud-1 and 5-HT1A genes in 5-HT neurons, no increase in anxiety- or depression-like behavior was seen upon knock-out of Freud-1 on the 5-HT1A autoreceptor-negative background; rather, a reduction in depression-like behavior emerged. These studies implicate transcriptional dysregulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors by the repressor Freud-1 in anxiety and depression and provide a clinically relevant genetic model of antidepressant resistance. Targeting specific transcription factors, such as Freud-1, to restore transcriptional balance may augment response to antidepressant treatment.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Altered regulation of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor has been implicated in human anxiety, major depression, suicide, and resistance to antidepressants. This study uniquely identifies a single transcription factor, Freud-1, as crucial for 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression in vivo Disruption of Freud-1 in serotonin neurons in mice links upregulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors to anxiety/depression-like behavior and provides a new model of antidepressant resistance. Treatment strategies to reestablish transcriptional regulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors could provide a more robust and sustained antidepressant response.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - 5P20CA90578(United States)

Distinct Inhibitory Circuits Orchestrate Cortical beta and gamma Band Oscillations.

  • Chen G
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Dec 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Distinct subtypes of inhibitory interneuron are known to shape diverse rhythmic activities in the cortex, but how they interact to orchestrate specific band activity remains largely unknown. By recording optogenetically tagged interneurons of specific subtypes in the primary visual cortex of behaving mice, we show that spiking of somatostatin (SOM)- and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons preferentially correlates with cortical beta and gamma band oscillations, respectively. Suppression of SOM cell spiking reduces the spontaneous low-frequency band (<30-Hz) oscillations and selectively reduces visually induced enhancement of beta oscillation. In comparison, suppressing PV cell activity elevates the synchronization of spontaneous activity across a broad frequency range and further precludes visually induced changes in beta and gamma oscillations. Rhythmic activation of SOM and PV cells in the local circuit entrains resonant activity in the narrow 5- to 30-Hz band and the wide 20- to 80-Hz band, respectively. Together, these findings reveal differential and cooperative roles of SOM and PV inhibitory neurons in orchestrating specific cortical oscillations.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - P51RR165(United States)

Transsynaptic Mapping of Second-Order Taste Neurons in Flies by trans-Tango.

  • Talay M
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Nov 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mapping neural circuits across defined synapses is essential for understanding brain function. Here we describe trans-Tango, a technique for anterograde transsynaptic circuit tracing and manipulation. At the core of trans-Tango is a synthetic signaling pathway that is introduced into all neurons in the animal. This pathway converts receptor activation at the cell surface into reporter expression through site-specific proteolysis. Specific labeling is achieved by presenting a tethered ligand at the synapses of genetically defined neurons, thereby activating the pathway in their postsynaptic partners and providing genetic access to these neurons. We first validated trans-Tango in the Drosophila olfactory system and then implemented it in the gustatory system, where projections beyond the first-order receptor neurons are not fully characterized. We identified putative second-order neurons within the sweet circuit that include projection neurons targeting known neuromodulation centers in the brain. These experiments establish trans-Tango as a flexible platform for transsynaptic circuit analysis.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC013561()
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R21 DC014333()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH086920()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH105368()

An Eya1-Notch axis specifies bipotential epibranchial differentiation in mammalian craniofacial morphogenesis.

  • Zhang H
  • Elife
  • 2017 Nov 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Craniofacial morphogenesis requires proper development of pharyngeal arches and epibranchial placodes. We show that the epibranchial placodes, in addition to giving rise to cranial sensory neurons, generate a novel lineage-related non-neuronal cell population for mouse pharyngeal arch development. Eya1 is essential for the development of epibranchial placodes and proximal pharyngeal arches. We identify an Eya1-Notch regulatory axis that specifies both the neuronal and non-neuronal commitment of the epibranchial placode, where Notch acts downstream of Eya1 and promotes the non-neuronal cell fate. Notch is regulated by the threonine phosphatase activity of Eya1. Eya1 dephosphorylates p-threonine-2122 of the Notch1 intracellular domain (Notch1 ICD), which increases the stability of Notch1 ICD and maintains Notch signaling activity in the non-neuronal epibranchial placodal cells. Our data unveil a more complex differentiation program in epibranchial placodes and an important role for the Eya1-Notch axis in craniofacial morphogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - T32 HL007088(United States)

Melanocyte Stem Cell Activation and Translocation Initiate Cutaneous Melanoma in Response to UV Exposure.

  • Moon H
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Nov 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Melanoma is one of the deadliest cancers, yet the cells of origin and mechanisms of tumor initiation remain unclear. The majority of melanomas emerge from clear skin without a precursor lesion, but it is unknown whether these melanomas can arise from melanocyte stem cells (MCSCs). Here we employ mouse models to define the role of MCSCs as melanoma cells of origin, demonstrate that MCSC quiescence acts as a tumor suppressor, and identify the extrinsic environmental and molecular factors required for the critical early steps of melanoma initiation. Specifically, melanomas originate from melanoma-competent MCSCs upon stimulation by UVB, which induces MCSC activation and translocation via an inflammation-dependent process. Moreover, the chromatin-remodeling factor Hmga2 in the skin plays a critical role in UVB-mediated melanomagenesis. These findings delineate melanoma formation from melanoma-competent MCSCs following extrinsic stimuli, and they suggest that abrogation of Hmga2 function in the microenvironment can suppress MCSC-originating cutaneous melanomas.

Rapid DNA replication origin licensing protects stem cell pluripotency.

  • Matson JP
  • Elife
  • 2017 Nov 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

Complete and robust human genome duplication requires loading minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase complexes at many DNA replication origins, an essential process termed origin licensing. Licensing is restricted to G1 phase of the cell cycle, but G1 length varies widely among cell types. Using quantitative single-cell analyses, we found that pluripotent stem cells with naturally short G1 phases load MCM much faster than their isogenic differentiated counterparts with long G1 phases. During the earliest stages of differentiation toward all lineages, MCM loading slows concurrently with G1 lengthening, revealing developmental control of MCM loading. In contrast, ectopic Cyclin E overproduction uncouples short G1 from fast MCM loading. Rapid licensing in stem cells is caused by accumulation of the MCM loading protein, Cdt1. Prematurely slowing MCM loading in pluripotent cells not only lengthens G1 but also accelerates differentiation. Thus, rapid origin licensing is an intrinsic characteristic of stem cells that contributes to pluripotency maintenance.

Suppression of Red Blood Cell Autofluorescence for Immunocytochemistry on Fixed Embryonic Mouse Tissue.

  • Whittington NC
  • Curr Protoc Neurosci
  • 2017 Oct 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Autofluorescence is a problem that interferes with immunofluorescent staining and complicates data analysis. Throughout the mouse embryo, red blood cells naturally fluoresce across multiple wavelengths, spanning the emission and excitation spectra of many commonly used fluorescent reporters, including antibodies, dyes, stains, probes, and transgenic proteins, making it difficult to distinguish assay fluorescence from endogenous fluorescence. Several tissue treatment methods have been developed to bypass this issue with varying degrees of success. Sudan Black B dye has been commonly used to quench autofluorescence, but can also introduce background fluorescence. Here we present a protocol for an alternative called TrueBlack Lipofuscin Autofluorescence Quencher. The protocol described in this unit demonstrates how TrueBlack efficiently quenches red blood cell autofluorescence across red and green wavelengths in fixed embryonic tissue without interfering with immunofluorescent signal intensity or introducing background staining. We also identify optimal incubation, concentration, and multiple usage conditions for routine immunofluorescence microscopy. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA NS002824-26()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - Z01 NS002824()

Microenvironment-Driven Shift of Cohesion/Detachment Balance within Tumors Induces a Switch toward Metastasis in Neuroblastoma.

  • Delloye-Bourgeois C
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2017 Oct 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood cancer arising from sympatho-adrenal neural crest cells. Disseminated forms have high frequency of multiple tumoral foci whose etiology remains unknown; NB embryonic origin limits investigations in patients and current models. We developed an avian embryonic model driving human NB tumorigenesis in tissues homologous to patients. We found that aggressive NBs display a metastatic mode, secondary dissemination via peripheral nerves and aorta. Through tumor transcriptional profiling, we found that NB dissemination is induced by the shutdown of a pro-cohesion autocrine signal, SEMA3C, which constrains the tumoral mass. Lowering SEMA3C levels shifts the balance toward detachment, triggering NB cells to collectively evade the tumor. Together with patient cohort analysis, this identifies a microenvironment-driven pro-metastatic switch for NB.

Aldosterone-Sensing Neurons in the NTS Exhibit State-Dependent Pacemaker Activity and Drive Sodium Appetite via Synergy with Angiotensin II Signaling.

  • Resch JM
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Sep 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

Sodium deficiency increases angiotensin II (ATII) and aldosterone, which synergistically stimulate sodium retention and consumption. Recently, ATII-responsive neurons in the subfornical organ (SFO) and aldosterone-sensitive neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTSHSD2 neurons) were shown to drive sodium appetite. Here we investigate the basis for NTSHSD2 neuron activation, identify the circuit by which NTSHSD2 neurons drive appetite, and uncover an interaction between the NTSHSD2 circuit and ATII signaling. NTSHSD2 neurons respond to sodium deficiency with spontaneous pacemaker-like activity-the consequence of "cardiac" HCN and Nav1.5 channels. Remarkably, NTSHSD2 neurons are necessary for sodium appetite, and with concurrent ATII signaling their activity is sufficient to produce rapid consumption. Importantly, NTSHSD2 neurons stimulate appetite via projections to the vlBNST, which is also the effector site for ATII-responsive SFO neurons. The interaction between angiotensin signaling and NTSHSD2 neurons provides a neuronal context for the long-standing "synergy hypothesis" of sodium appetite regulation.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - F32 DK103387()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK046200()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK057521()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK075632()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK089044()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK096010()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK111401()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - K08 NS099425()

Inter-adipocyte Adhesion and Signaling by Collagen IV Intercellular Concentrations in Drosophila.

  • Dai J
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2017 Sep 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Sheet-forming Collagen IV is the main component of basement membranes, which are planar polymers of extracellular matrix underlying epithelia and surrounding organs in all animals. Adipocytes in both insects and mammals are mesodermal in origin and often classified as mesenchymal. However, they form true tissues where cells remain compactly associated. Neither the mechanisms providing this tissue-level organization nor its functional significance are known. Here we show that discrete Collagen IV intercellular concentrations (CIVICs), distinct from basement membranes and thicker in section, mediate inter-adipocyte adhesion in Drosophila. Loss of these Collagen-IV-containing structures in the larval fat body caused intercellular gaps and disrupted continuity of the adipose tissue layer. We also found that Integrin and Syndecan matrix receptors attach adipocytes to CIVICs and direct their formation. Finally, we show that Integrin-mediated adhesion to CIVICs promotes normal adipocyte growth and prevents autophagy through Src-Pi3K-Akt signaling. Our results evidence a surprising non-basement membrane role of Collagen IV in non-epithelial tissue morphogenesis while demonstrating adhesion and signaling functions for these structures.

Spin infection enables efficient gene delivery to muscle stem cells.

  • Kodaka Y
  • BioTechniques
  • 2017 Aug 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Viral vector-mediated foreign gene expression in cultured cells has been extensively used in stem cell studies to explore gene function. However, it is difficult to obtain high-quality stem cells and primary cells after viral vector infection. Here, we describe a new protocol for high-efficiency retroviral infection of primary muscle stem cell (satellite cell) cultures. We compared multiple commercially available transfection reagents to determine which was optimal for retroviral infections of primary myoblasts. Centrifugation force was also tested, and a spin infection protocol with centrifugation at 2800 × g for 90 min had the highest infection efficiency for primary myoblasts. We confirmed that infected muscle stem cells maintain cell proliferation and the capacity for in vitro and in vivo myogenic differentiation. Our new, efficient retroviral infection protocol for muscle stem cells can be applied to molecular biology experiments as well as translational studies.

Funding information:
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR062142()
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R21 AR070319()

ARX polyalanine expansion mutations lead to migration impediment in the rostral cortex coupled with a developmental deficit of calbindin-positive cortical GABAergic interneurons.

  • Lee K
  • Neuroscience
  • 2017 Aug 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The Aristaless-related homeobox gene (ARX) is indispensable for interneuron development. Patients with ARX polyalanine expansion mutations of the first two tracts (namely PA1 and PA2) suffer from intellectual disability of varying severity, with seizures a frequent comorbidity. The impact of PA1 and PA2 mutations on the brain development is unknown, hindering the search for therapeutic interventions. Here, we characterized the disturbances to cortical interneuron development in mice modeling the two most common ARX polyalanine expansion mutations in human. We found a consistent ∼40-50% reduction of calbindin-positive interneurons, but not Stt+ or Cr+ interneurons, within the cortex of newborn hemizygous mice (p=0.024) for both mutant strains compared to wildtype (p=0.011). We demonstrate that this was a consequence of calbindin precursor cells being arrested or delayed at the ventral subpallium en route of tangential migration. Ex-vivo assay validated this migration deficit in PA1 cells (p=0.0002) suggesting that the defect is contributed by intrinsic loss of Arx function within migrating cells. Both humans and mice with PA1 mutations present with severe clinical features, including intellectual disability and infantile spasms. Our data further demonstrated the pathogenic mechanism was robustly shared between PA1 and PA2 mutations, as previously reported including Arx protein reduction and overlapping transcriptome profiles within the developing mouse brains. Data from our study demonstrated that cortical calbindin interneuron development and migration is negatively affected by ARX polyalanine expansion mutations. Understanding the cellular pathogenesis contributing to disease manifestation is necessary to screen efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions.

An Engineered orco Mutation Produces Aberrant Social Behavior and Defective Neural Development in Ants.

  • Yan H
  • Cell
  • 2017 Aug 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Ants exhibit cooperative behaviors and advanced forms of sociality that depend on pheromone-mediated communication. Odorant receptor neurons (ORNs) express specific odorant receptors (ORs) encoded by a dramatically expanded gene family in ants. In most eusocial insects, only the queen can transmit genetic information, restricting genetic studies. In contrast, workers in Harpegnathos saltator ants can be converted into gamergates (pseudoqueens) that can found entire colonies. This feature facilitated CRISPR-Cas9 generation of germline mutations in orco, the gene that encodes the obligate co-receptor of all ORs. orco mutations should significantly impact olfaction. We demonstrate striking functions of Orco in odorant perception, reproductive physiology, and social behavior plasticity. Surprisingly, unlike in other insects, loss of OR functionality also dramatically impairs development of the antennal lobe to which ORNs project. Therefore, the development of genetics in Harpegnathos establishes this ant species as a model organism to study the complexity of eusociality.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - DP2 MH107055()

Dopamine neuron dependent behaviors mediated by glutamate cotransmission.

  • Mingote S
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jul 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area use glutamate as a cotransmitter. To elucidate the behavioral role of the cotransmission, we targeted the glutamate-recycling enzyme glutaminase (gene Gls1). In mice with a dopamine transporter (Slc6a3)-driven conditional heterozygous (cHET) reduction of Gls1 in their dopamine neurons, dopamine neuron survival and transmission were unaffected, while glutamate cotransmission at phasic firing frequencies was reduced, enabling a selective focus on the cotransmission. The mice showed normal emotional and motor behaviors, and an unaffected response to acute amphetamine. Strikingly, amphetamine sensitization was reduced and latent inhibition potentiated. These behavioral effects, also seen in global GLS1 HETs with a schizophrenia resilience phenotype, were not seen in mice with an Emx1-driven forebrain reduction affecting most brain glutamatergic neurons. Thus, a reduction in dopamine neuron glutamate cotransmission appears to mediate significant components of the GLS1 HET schizophrenia resilience phenotype, and glutamate cotransmission appears to be important in attribution of motivational salience.

Recruited Monocytes and Type 2 Immunity Promote Lung Regeneration following Pneumonectomy.

  • Lechner AJ
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Jul 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

To investigate the role of immune cells in lung regeneration, we used a unilateral pneumonectomy model that promotes the formation of new alveoli in the remaining lobes. Immunofluorescence and single-cell RNA sequencing found CD115+ and CCR2+ monocytes and M2-like macrophages accumulating in the lung during the peak of type 2 alveolar epithelial stem cell (AEC2) proliferation. Genetic loss of function in mice and adoptive transfer studies revealed that bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) traffic to the lung through a CCL2-CCR2 chemokine axis and are required for optimal lung regeneration, along with Il4ra-expressing leukocytes. Our data suggest that these cells modulate AEC2 proliferation and differentiation. Finally, we provide evidence that group 2 innate lymphoid cells are a source of IL-13, which promotes lung regeneration. Together, our data highlight the potential for immunomodulatory therapies to stimulate alveologenesis in adults.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - F30 HL131198()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL127002()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - U01 HL134766()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007618()

Transcriptional Dynamics of Cultured Human Villous Cytotrophoblasts.

  • Robinson JF
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

During human pregnancy, cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) play key roles in uterine invasion, vascular remodeling, and anchoring of the feto-placental unit. Due to the challenges associated with studying human placentation in utero, cultured primary villous CTBs are used as a model of the differentiation pathway that leads to invasion of the uterine wall. In vitro, CTBs emulate in vivo cell behaviors, such as migration, aggregation, and substrate penetration. Although some of the molecular features related to these cell behaviors have been described, the underlying mechanisms, at a global level, remain undefined at midgestation. Thus, in this study, we characterized second-trimester CTB differentiation/invasion in vitro, correlating the major morphological transitions with the transcriptional changes that occurred at these steps. After plating on Matrigel as individual cells, CTBs migrated toward each other and formed multicellular aggregates. In parallel, using a microarray approach, we observed differentially expressed (DE) genes across time, which were enriched for numerous functions, including cell migration, vascular remodeling, morphogenesis, cell communication, and inflammatory signaling. DE genes encoded several molecules that we and others previously linked to critical CTB function in vivo, suggesting that the novel DE molecules we discovered played important roles. Immunolocalization confirmed that CTBs in situ gave a signal for two of the most highly expressed genes in vitro. In summary, we characterized, at a global level, the temporal dynamics of primary human CTB gene expression in culture. These data will enable future analyses of various types of in vitro perturbations-for example, modeling disease processes and environmental exposures.

Funding information:
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - K99 ES023846()
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - P01 ES022841()
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - R00 ES023846()

GATA4 Regulates Blood-Testis Barrier Function and Lactate Metabolism in Mouse Sertoli Cells.

  • Schrade A
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Jun 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Conditional deletion of Gata4 in Sertoli cells (SCs) of adult mice has been shown to increase permeability of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) and disrupt spermatogenesis. To gain insight into the molecular underpinnings of these phenotypic abnormalities, we assessed the impact of Gata4 gene silencing in cell culture models. Microarray hybridization identified genes dysregulated by siRNA-mediated inhibition of Gata4 in TM4 cells, an immortalized mouse SC line. Differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of primary cultures of Gata4(flox/flox) mouse SCs that had been subjected to cre-mediated recombination in vitro. Depletion of GATA4 in TM4 cells and primary SCs was associated with altered expression of genes involved in key facets of BTB maintenance, including tight/adherens junction formation (Tjp1, Cldn12, Vcl, Tnc, Csk) and extracellular matrix reorganization (Lamc1, Col4a1, Col4a5, Mmp10, Mmp23, Timp2). Western blotting and immunocytochemistry demonstrated reduced levels of tight junction protein-1, a prototypical tight junction protein, in GATA4-depleted cells. These changes were accompanied by a loss of morphologically recognizable junctional complexes and a decline in epithelial membrane resistance. Furthermore, Gata4 gene silencing was associated with altered expression of Hk1, Gpi1, Pfkp, Pgam1, Gls2, Pdk3, Pkd4, and Ldhb, genes regulating the production of lactate, a key nutrient that SCs provide to developing germ cells. Comprehensive metabolomic profiling demonstrated impaired lactate production in GATA4-deficient SCs. We conclude that GATA4 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of BTB function and lactate metabolism in mouse SCs.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM084279(United States)

Human embryonic lung epithelial tips are multipotent progenitors that can be expanded in vitro as long-term self-renewing organoids.

  • Nikolić MZ
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jun 30

Literature context:


Abstract:

The embryonic mouse lung is a widely used substitute for human lung development. For example, attempts to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells to lung epithelium rely on passing through progenitor states that have only been described in mouse. The tip epithelium of the branching mouse lung is a multipotent progenitor pool that self-renews and produces differentiating descendants. We hypothesized that the human distal tip epithelium is an analogous progenitor population and tested this by examining morphology, gene expression and in vitro self-renewal and differentiation capacity of human tips. These experiments confirm that human and mouse tips are analogous and identify signalling pathways that are sufficient for long-term self-renewal of human tips as differentiation-competent organoids. Moreover, we identify mouse-human differences, including markers that define progenitor states and signalling requirements for long-term self-renewal. Our organoid system provides a genetically-tractable tool that will allow these human-specific features of lung development to be investigated.

A Sacrifice-for-Survival Mechanism Protects Root Stem Cell Niche from Chilling Stress.

  • Hong JH
  • Cell
  • 2017 Jun 29

Literature context:


Abstract:

Temperature has a profound influence on plant and animal development, but its effects on stem cell behavior and activity remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the responses of the Arabidopsis root to chilling (low but above-freezing) temperature. Chilling stress at 4°C leads to DNA damage predominantly in root stem cells and their early descendants. However, only newly generated/differentiating columella stem cell daughters (CSCDs) preferentially die in a programmed manner. Inhibition of the DNA damage response in these CSCDs prevents their death but makes the stem cell niche more vulnerable to chilling stress. Mathematical modeling and experimental validation indicate that CSCD death results in the re-establishment of the auxin maximum in the quiescent center (QC) and the maintenance of functional stem cell niche activity under chilling stress. This mechanism improves the root's ability to withstand the accompanying environmental stresses and to resume growth when optimal temperatures are restored.

Amitosis of Polyploid Cells Regenerates Functional Stem Cells in the Drosophila Intestine.

  • Lucchetta EM
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 May 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Organ fitness depends on appropriate maintenance of stem cell populations, and aberrations in functional stem cell numbers are associated with malignancies and aging. Symmetrical division is the best characterized mechanism of stem cell replacement, but other mechanisms could also be deployed, particularly in situations of high stress. Here, we show that after severe depletion, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the Drosophila midgut are replaced by spindle-independent ploidy reduction of cells in the enterocyte lineage through a process known as amitosis. Amitosis is also induced by the functional loss of ISCs coupled with tissue demand and in aging flies, underscoring the generality of this mechanism. However, we also found that random homologous chromosome segregation during ploidy reduction can expose deleterious mutations through loss of heterozygosity. Together, our results highlight amitosis as an unappreciated mechanism for restoring stem cell homeostasis, but one with some associated risk in animals carrying mutations.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - T32 HD055165()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK107702()

Deciphering Pancreatic Islet β Cell and α Cell Maturation Pathways and Characteristic Features at the Single-Cell Level.

  • Qiu WL
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2017 May 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Pancreatic β and α cells play essential roles in maintaining glucose homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which these distinct cell populations are generated, expand, and mature during pancreas development remain unclear. In this study, we addressed this critical question by performing a single-cell transcriptomic analysis of mouse β and α cells sorted from fetal to adult stages. We discovered that β and α cells use different regulatory strategies for their maturation and that cell proliferation peaks at different developmental times. However, the quiescent and proliferative cells in both the β lineage and α lineage are synchronous in their maturation states. The heterogeneity of juvenile β cells reflects distinct cell-cycling phases, origins, and maturation states, whereas adult β cells are relatively homogeneous at the transcriptomic level. These analyses provide not only a high-resolution roadmap for islet lineage development but also insights into the mechanisms of cellular heterogeneity, cell number expansion, and maturation of both β and α cells.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - Z01-HD008776(United States)

Serotonergic Projections Govern Postnatal Neuroblast Migration.

  • García-González D
  • Neuron
  • 2017 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

In many vertebrates, postnatally generated neurons often migrate long distances to reach their final destination, where they help shape local circuit activity. Concerted action of extrinsic stimuli is required to regulate long-distance migration. Some migratory principles are evolutionarily conserved, whereas others are species and cell type specific. Here we identified a serotonergic mechanism that governs migration of postnatally generated neurons in the mouse brain. Serotonergic axons originating from the raphe nuclei exhibit a conspicuous alignment with subventricular zone-derived neuroblasts. Optogenetic axonal activation provides functional evidence for serotonergic modulation of neuroblast migration. Furthermore, we show that the underlying mechanism involves serotonin receptor 3A (5HT3A)-mediated calcium influx. Thus, 5HT3A receptor deletion in neuroblasts impaired speed and directionality of migration and abolished calcium spikes. We speculate that serotonergic modulation of postnatally generated neuroblast migration is evolutionarily conserved as indicated by the presence of serotonergic axons in migratory paths in other vertebrates.

Ribonucleotide Reductase Requires Subunit Switching in Hypoxia to Maintain DNA Replication.

  • Foskolou IP
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cells exposed to hypoxia experience replication stress but do not accumulate DNA damage, suggesting sustained DNA replication. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is the only enzyme capable of de novo synthesis of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). However, oxygen is an essential cofactor for mammalian RNR (RRM1/RRM2 and RRM1/RRM2B), leading us to question the source of dNTPs in hypoxia. Here, we show that the RRM1/RRM2B enzyme is capable of retaining activity in hypoxia and therefore is favored over RRM1/RRM2 in order to preserve ongoing replication and avoid the accumulation of DNA damage. We found two distinct mechanisms by which RRM2B maintains hypoxic activity and identified responsible residues in RRM2B. The importance of RRM2B in the response to tumor hypoxia is further illustrated by correlation of its expression with a hypoxic signature in patient samples and its roles in tumor growth and radioresistance. Our data provide mechanistic insight into RNR biology, highlighting RRM2B as a hypoxic-specific, anti-cancer therapeutic target.

An immunohistochemical study on the distribution of vasotocin neurons in the brain of two weakly electric fish, Gymnotus omarorum and Brachyhypopomus gauderio.

  • Pouso P
  • Tissue Cell
  • 2017 Apr 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hypothalamic nonapeptides (arginin vasotocin-vasopressin, oxytocin-isotocin) are known to modulate social behaviors across vertebrates. The neuroanatomical conservation of nonapeptide systems enables the use of novel vertebrate model species to identify general strategies of their functional mechanisms. We present a detailed immunohistochemical description of vasotocin (AVT) cell populations and their projections in two species of weakly electric fish with different social structure, Gymnotus omarorum and Brachyhypopomus gauderio. Strong behavioral, pharmacological, and electrophysiological evidence support that AVT modulation of electric behavior differs between the gregarious B. gauderio and the solitary G. omarorum. This functional diversity does not necessarily depend on anatomical differences of AVT neurons. To test this, we focus on interspecific comparisons of the AVT system in basal non-breeding males along the brain. G. omarorum and B. gauderio showed similar AVT somata sizes and comparable distributions of AVT somata and fibers. Interestingly, AVT fibers project to areas related to the control of social behavior and electromotor displays in both species. We found that no gross anatomical differences in the organization of the AVT system account for functional differences between species, which rather shall depend on the pattern of activation of neurons embedded in the same basic anatomical organization of the AVT system.

Diazepam Binding Inhibitor Promotes Stem Cell Expansion Controlling Environment-Dependent Neurogenesis.

  • Dumitru I
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Apr 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Plasticity of adult neurogenesis supports adaptation to environmental changes. The identification of molecular mediators that signal these changes to neural progenitors in the niche has remained elusive. Here we report that diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) is crucial in supporting an adaptive mechanism in response to changes in the environment. We provide evidence that DBI is expressed in stem cells in all neurogenic niches of the postnatal brain. Focusing on the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) and employing multiple genetic manipulations in vivo, we demonstrate that DBI regulates the balance between preserving the stem cell pool and neurogenesis. Specifically, DBI dampens GABA activity in stem cells, thereby sustaining the proproliferative effect of physical exercise and enriched environment. Our data lend credence to the notion that the modulatory effect of DBI constitutes a general mechanism that regulates postnatal neurogenesis.

Dopamine neuronal loss contributes to memory and reward dysfunction in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

  • Nobili A
  • Nat Commun
  • 2017 Apr 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Alterations of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system are frequently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and are commonly linked to cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms. However, the cause of DAergic system dysfunction in AD remains to be elucidated. We investigated alterations of the midbrain DAergic system in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD, overexpressing a mutated human amyloid precursor protein (APPswe). Here, we found an age-dependent DAergic neuron loss in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) at pre-plaque stages, although substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) DAergic neurons were intact. The selective VTA DAergic neuron degeneration results in lower DA outflow in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell. The progression of DAergic cell death correlates with impairments in CA1 synaptic plasticity, memory performance and food reward processing. We conclude that in this mouse model of AD, degeneration of VTA DAergic neurons at pre-plaque stages contributes to memory deficits and dysfunction of reward processing.

The Emergence of Directional Selectivity in the Visual Motion Pathway of Drosophila.

  • Strother JA
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Apr 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

The perception of visual motion is critical for animal navigation, and flies are a prominent model system for exploring this neural computation. In Drosophila, the T4 cells of the medulla are directionally selective and necessary for ON motion behavioral responses. To examine the emergence of directional selectivity, we developed genetic driver lines for the neuron types with the most synapses onto T4 cells. Using calcium imaging, we found that these neuron types are not directionally selective and that selectivity arises in the T4 dendrites. By silencing each input neuron type, we identified which neurons are necessary for T4 directional selectivity and ON motion behavioral responses. We then determined the sign of the connections between these neurons and T4 cells using neuronal photoactivation. Our results indicate a computational architecture for motion detection that is a hybrid of classic theoretical models.

A MEN1 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour mouse model under temporal control.

  • Lines KE
  • Endocr Connect
  • 2017 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by occurrence of parathyroid tumours and neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the pancreatic islets and anterior pituitary. The MEN1 gene, encoding menin, is a tumour suppressor, but its precise role in initiating in vivo tumourigenesis remains to be elucidated. The availability of a temporally controlled conditional MEN1 mouse model would greatly facilitate the study of such early tumourigenic events, and overcome the limitations of other MEN1 knockout models, in which menin is lost from conception or tumour development occurs asynchronously. To generate a temporally controlled conditional mouse model, we crossbred mice with the MEN1 gene floxed by LoxP sites (Men1L/L ), and mice expressing tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase under the control of the rat insulin promoter (RIP2-CreER), to establish a pancreatic β-cell-specific NET model under temporal control (Men1L/L /RIP2-CreER). Men1L/L /RIP2-CreER mice aged ~3 months were given tamoxifen in the diet for 5 days, and pancreata harvested 2-2.5, 2.9-3.5 and 4.5-5.5 months later. Control mice did not express Cre and did not receive tamoxifen. Immunostaining of pancreata from tamoxifen-treated Men1L/L /RIP2-CreER mice, compared to control mice, showed at all ages: loss of menin in all islets; increased islet area (>4.2-fold); increased proliferation of insulin immunostaining β-cells (>2.3-fold) and decreased proliferation of glucagon immunostaining α-cells (>1.7-fold). There were no gender and apoptotic or proliferation differences, and extra-pancreatic tumours were not detected. Thus, we have established a mouse model (Men1L/L /RIP2-CreER) to study early events in the development of pancreatic β-cell NETs.

Progression of Pro23His Retinopathy in a Miniature Swine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

  • Scott PA
  • Transl Vis Sci Technol
  • 2017 Mar 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

PURPOSE: We characterize the progression of retinopathy in Filial 1 (F1) progeny of a transgenic (Tg) founder miniswine exhibiting severe Pro23His (P23H) retinopathy. METHODS: The F1 TgP23H miniswine progeny were created by crossing TgP23H founder miniswine 53-1 with wild type (WT) inbred miniature swine. Scotopic (rod-driven) and photopic (cone-driven) retinal functions were evaluated in F1 TgP23H and WT littermates using full field electroretinograms (ffERGs) at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of age, as well as the Tg founder miniswine at 6 years of age. Miniswine were euthanized and their retinas processed for morphologic evaluation at the light and electron microscopic level. Retinal morphology of a 36-month-old Tg miniswine also was examined. RESULTS: Wild type littermates reached mature scotopic and photopic retinal function by 3 months, while TgP23H miniswine showed abnormal scotopic ffERGs at the earliest time point, 1 month, and depressed photopic ffERGs after 2 months. Rod and cone photoreceptors (PR) exhibited morphologic abnormalities and dropout from the outer nuclear layer at 1 month, with only a monolayer of cone PR somata remaining after 2 months. The retinas showed progressive neural remodeling of the outer retina that included dendritic retraction of rod bipolar cells and glial seal formation by Müller cells. The TgP23H founder miniswine showed cone PR with relatively intact morphology exclusive to the area centralis. CONCLUSIONS: The F1 Tg miniswine and the TgP23H founder miniswine exhibit similar retinopathy. TRANSLATIONAL RELEVANCE: TgP23H miniswine are a useful large-eye model to study pathogenesis and preservation cone PRs in humans with retinitis pigmentosa.

Funding information:
  • NIH HHS - U42 OD011140()

Neurogenic Radial Glia-like Cells in Meninges Migrate and Differentiate into Functionally Integrated Neurons in the Neonatal Cortex.

  • Bifari F
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Mar 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Whether new neurons are added in the postnatal cerebral cortex is still debated. Here, we report that the meninges of perinatal mice contain a population of neurogenic progenitors formed during embryonic development that migrate to the caudal cortex and differentiate into Satb2+ neurons in cortical layers II-IV. The resulting neurons are electrically functional and integrated into local microcircuits. Single-cell RNA sequencing identified meningeal cells with distinct transcriptome signatures characteristic of (1) neurogenic radial glia-like cells (resembling neural stem cells in the SVZ), (2) neuronal cells, and (3) a cell type with an intermediate phenotype, possibly representing radial glia-like meningeal cells differentiating to neuronal cells. Thus, we have identified a pool of embryonically derived radial glia-like cells present in the meninges that migrate and differentiate into functional neurons in the neonatal cerebral cortex.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS036715(United States)

Transcription factor Emx2 controls stereociliary bundle orientation of sensory hair cells.

  • Jiang T
  • Elife
  • 2017 Mar 7

Literature context:


Abstract:

The asymmetric location of stereociliary bundle (hair bundle) on the apical surface of mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) dictates the direction in which a given HC can respond to cues such as sound, head movements, and water pressure. Notably, vestibular sensory organs of the inner ear, the maculae, exhibit a line of polarity reversal (LPR) across which, hair bundles are polarized in a mirror-image pattern. Similarly, HCs in neuromasts of the zebrafish lateral line system are generated as pairs, and two sibling HCs develop opposite hair bundle orientations. Within these sensory organs, expression of the transcription factor Emx2 is restricted to only one side of the LPR in the maculae or one of the two sibling HCs in neuromasts. Emx2 mediates hair bundle polarity reversal in these restricted subsets of HCs and generates the mirror-image pattern of the sensory organs. Downstream effectors of Emx2 control bundle polarity cell-autonomously via heterotrimeric G proteins.

Endogenous opioids regulate moment-to-moment neuronal communication and excitability.

  • Winters BL
  • Nat Commun
  • 2017 Mar 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Fear and emotional learning are modulated by endogenous opioids but the cellular basis for this is unknown. The intercalated cells (ITCs) gate amygdala output and thus regulate the fear response. Here we find endogenous opioids are released by synaptic stimulation to act via two distinct mechanisms within the main ITC cluster. Endogenously released opioids inhibit glutamate release through the δ-opioid receptor (DOR), an effect potentiated by a DOR-positive allosteric modulator. Postsynaptically, the opioids activate a potassium conductance through the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), suggesting for the first time that endogenously released opioids directly regulate neuronal excitability. Ultrastructural localization of endogenous ligands support these functional findings. This study demonstrates a new role for endogenously released opioids as neuromodulators engaged by synaptic activity to regulate moment-to-moment neuronal communication and excitability. These distinct actions through MOR and DOR may underlie the opposing effect of these receptor systems on anxiety and fear.

Funding information:
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - R01 DE012640()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - P30 NS061800()

CREB Signaling Is Involved in Rett Syndrome Pathogenesis.

  • Bu Q
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Mar 29

Literature context:


Abstract:

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. To facilitate the study of cellular mechanisms in human cells, we established several human stem cell lines: human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line carrying the common T158M mutation (MECP2T158M/T158M ), hESC line expressing no MECP2 (MECP2-KO), congenic pair of wild-type and mutant RTT patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line carrying the V247fs mutation (V247fs-WT and V247fs-MT), and iPSC line in which the V247fs mutation was corrected by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing (V247fs-MT-correction). Detailed analyses of forebrain neurons differentiated from these human stem cell lines revealed genotype-dependent quantitative phenotypes in neurite growth, dendritic complexity, and mitochondrial function. At the molecular level, we found a significant reduction in the level of CREB and phosphorylated CREB in forebrain neurons differentiated from MECP2T158M/T158M , MECP2-KO, and V247fs-MT stem cell lines. Importantly, overexpression of CREB or pharmacological activation of CREB signaling in those forebrain neurons rescued the phenotypes in neurite growth, dendritic complexity, and mitochondrial function. Finally, pharmacological activation of CREB in the female Mecp2 heterozygous mice rescued several behavioral defects. Together, our study establishes a robust in vitro platform for consistent quantitative evaluation of genotype-dependent RTT phenotypes, reveals a previously unappreciated role of CREB signaling in RTT pathogenesis, and identifies a potential therapeutic target for RTT.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study establishes a robust human stem cell-based platform for consistent quantitative evaluation of genotype-dependent Rett syndrome (RTT) phenotypes at the cellular level. By providing the first evidence that enhancing cAMP response element binding protein signaling can alleviate RTT phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo, we reveal a previously unappreciated role of cAMP response element binding protein signaling in RTT pathogenesis, and identify a potential therapeutic target for RTT.

Targeted Apoptosis of Senescent Cells Restores Tissue Homeostasis in Response to Chemotoxicity and Aging.

  • Baar MP
  • Cell
  • 2017 Mar 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

The accumulation of irreparable cellular damage restricts healthspan after acute stress or natural aging. Senescent cells are thought to impair tissue function, and their genetic clearance can delay features of aging. Identifying how senescent cells avoid apoptosis allows for the prospective design of anti-senescence compounds to address whether homeostasis can also be restored. Here, we identify FOXO4 as a pivot in senescent cell viability. We designed a FOXO4 peptide that perturbs the FOXO4 interaction with p53. In senescent cells, this selectively causes p53 nuclear exclusion and cell-intrinsic apoptosis. Under conditions where it was well tolerated in vivo, this FOXO4 peptide neutralized doxorubicin-induced chemotoxicity. Moreover, it restored fitness, fur density, and renal function in both fast aging XpdTTD/TTD and naturally aged mice. Thus, therapeutic targeting of senescent cells is feasible under conditions where loss of health has already occurred, and in doing so tissue homeostasis can effectively be restored.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - P01 AG017242()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R37 AG009909()

An unexpected role for the yeast nucleotide exchange factor Sil1 as a reductant acting on the molecular chaperone BiP.

  • Siegenthaler KD
  • Elife
  • 2017 Mar 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Unfavorable redox conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can decrease the capacity for protein secretion, altering vital cell functions. While systems to manage reductive stress are well-established, how cells cope with an overly oxidizing ER remains largely undefined. In previous work (Wang et al., 2014), we demonstrated that the chaperone BiP is a sensor of overly oxidizing ER conditions. We showed that modification of a conserved BiP cysteine during stress beneficially alters BiP chaperone activity to cope with suboptimal folding conditions. How this cysteine is reduced to reestablish 'normal' BiP activity post-oxidative stress has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that BiP's nucleotide exchange factor - Sil1 - can reverse BiP cysteine oxidation. This previously unexpected reductant capacity for yeast Sil1 has potential implications for the human ataxia Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome, where it is interesting to speculate that a disruption in ER redox-signaling (due to genetic defects in SIL1) may influence disease pathology.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM105958()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007273()

SoxC Transcription Factors Promote Contralateral Retinal Ganglion Cell Differentiation and Axon Guidance in the Mouse Visual System.

  • Kuwajima T
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Mar 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Transcription factors control cell identity by regulating diverse developmental steps such as differentiation and axon guidance. The mammalian binocular visual circuit is comprised of projections of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to ipsilateral and contralateral targets in the brain. A transcriptional code for ipsilateral RGC identity has been identified, but less is known about the transcriptional regulation of contralateral RGC development. Here we demonstrate that SoxC genes (Sox4, 11, and 12) act on the progenitor-to-postmitotic transition to implement contralateral, but not ipsilateral, RGC differentiation, by binding to Hes5 and thus repressing Notch signaling. When SoxC genes are deleted in postmitotic RGCs, contralateral RGC axons grow poorly on chiasm cells in vitro and project ipsilaterally at the chiasm midline in vivo, and Plexin-A1 and Nr-CAM expression in RGCs is downregulated. These data implicate SoxC transcription factors in the regulation of contralateral RGC differentiation and axon guidance.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY012736()
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY015290()
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR046249()
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR060016()

Centrosome Amplification Is Sufficient to Promote Spontaneous Tumorigenesis in Mammals.

  • Levine MS
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Feb 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Centrosome amplification is a common feature of human tumors, but whether this is a cause or a consequence of cancer remains unclear. Here, we test the consequence of centrosome amplification by creating mice in which centrosome number can be chronically increased in the absence of additional genetic defects. We show that increasing centrosome number elevated tumor initiation in a mouse model of intestinal neoplasia. Most importantly, we demonstrate that supernumerary centrosomes are sufficient to drive aneuploidy and the development of spontaneous tumors in multiple tissues. Tumors arising from centrosome amplification exhibit frequent mitotic errors and possess complex karyotypes, recapitulating a common feature of human cancer. Together, our data support a direct causal relationship among centrosome amplification, genomic instability, and tumor development.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM029513()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM114119()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R37 GM029513()

Impaired constitutive and regenerative neurogenesis in adult hyperglycemic zebrafish.

  • Dorsemans AC
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2017 Feb 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

A growing body of evidence supports hyperglycemia as a putative contributor to several brain dysfunctions observed in diabetes patients, such as impaired memory capacity, neural plasticity, and neurogenic processes. Thanks to the persistence of radial glial cells acting as neural stem cells, the brain of the adult zebrafish constitutes a relevant model to investigate constitutive and injury-induced neurogenesis in adult vertebrates. However, there is limited understanding of the impact of hyperglycemia on brain dysfunction in the zebrafish model. This work aimed at exploring the impact of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on brain homeostasis and neurogenesis. Acute hyperglycemia was shown to promote gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines (il1β, il6, il8, and tnfα) in the brain and chronic hyperglycemia to impair expression of genes involved in the establishment of the blood-brain barrier (claudin 5a, zona occludens 1a and b). Chronic hyperglycemia also decreased brain cell proliferation in most neurogenic niches throughout the forebrain and the midbrain. By using a stab wound telencephalic injury model, the impact of hyperglycemia on brain repair mechanisms was investigated. Whereas the initial step of parenchymal cell proliferation was not affected by acute hyperglycemia, later proliferation of neural progenitors was significantly decreased by chronic hyperglycemia in the injured brain of fish. Taken together, these data offer new evidence highlighting the evolutionary conserved adverse effects of hyperglycemia on neurogenesis and brain healing in zebrafish. In addition, our study reinforces the utility of zebrafish as a robust model for studying the effects of metabolic disorders on the central nervous system. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:442-458, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG042511(United States)

Induced Quiescence of Lgr5+ Stem Cells in Intestinal Organoids Enables Differentiation of Hormone-Producing Enteroendocrine Cells.

  • Basak O
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Feb 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Lgr5+ adult intestinal stem cells are highly proliferative throughout life. Single Lgr5+ stem cells can be cultured into three-dimensional organoids containing all intestinal epithelial cell types at near-normal ratios. Conditions to generate the main cell types (enterocyte, goblet cells, Paneth cells, and M cells) are well established, but signals to induce the spectrum of hormone-producing enteroendocrine cells (EECs) have remained elusive. Here, we induce Lgr5+ stem cell quiescence in vitro by blocking epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in organoids and show that their quiescent state is readily reverted. Quiescent Lgr5+ stem cells acquire a distinct molecular signature biased toward EEC differentiation. Indeed, combined inhibition of Wnt, Notch, and MAPK pathways efficiently generates a diversity of EEC hormone-expressing subtypes in vitro. Our observations uncouple Wnt-dependent stem cell maintenance from EGF-dependent proliferation and provide an approach for the study of the elusive EECs in a defined environment.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM008061(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R21NS073585-01A1(United States)

α2-Adrenergic blockade rescues hypoglossal motor defense against obstructive sleep apnea.

  • Song G
  • JCI Insight
  • 2017 Feb 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Decreased noradrenergic excitation of hypoglossal motoneurons during sleep causing hypotonia of pharyngeal dilator muscles is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a widespread disease for which treatment options are limited. Previous OSA drug candidates targeting various excitatory/inhibitory receptors on hypoglossal motoneurons have proved unviable in reactivating these neurons, particularly during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. To identify a viable drug target, we show that the repurposed α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine potently reversed the depressant effect of REM sleep on baseline hypoglossal motoneuron activity (a first-line motor defense against OSA) in rats. Remarkably, yohimbine also restored the obstructive apnea-induced long-term facilitation of hypoglossal motoneuron activity (hLTF), a much-neglected form of noradrenergic-dependent neuroplasticity that could provide a second-line motor defense against OSA but was also depressed during REM sleep. Corroborating immunohistologic, optogenetic, and pharmacologic evidence confirmed that yohimbine's beneficial effects on baseline hypoglossal motoneuron activity and hLTF were mediated mainly through activation of pontine A7 and A5 noradrenergic neurons. Our results suggest a 2-tier (impaired first- and second-line motor defense) mechanism of noradrenergic-dependent pathogenesis of OSA and a promising pharmacotherapy for rescuing both these intrinsic defenses against OSA through disinhibition of A7 and A5 neurons by α2-adrenergic blockade.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL093225()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R56 HL127258()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS094178()

Serotonin-containing neurons in basal insects: In search of ground patterns among tetraconata.

  • Stemme T
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2017 Jan 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The ventral nerve cord of Tetraconata contains a comparably low number of serotonin-immunoreactive neurons, facilitating individual identification of cells and their characteristic neurite morphology. This offers the rather unique possibility of establishing homologies at the single cell level. Because phylogenetic relationships within Tetraconata are still discussed controversially, comparisons of individually identifiable neurons can help to unravel these issues. Serotonin immunoreactivity has been investigated in numerous tetraconate taxa, leading to reconstructions of hypothetical ground patterns for major lineages. However, detailed descriptions of basal insects are still missing, but are crucial for meaningful evolutionary considerations. We investigated the morphology of individually identifiable serotonin-immunoreactive neurons in the ventral nerve cord of Zygentoma (Thermobia domestica, Lepisma saccharina, Atelura formicaria) and Archaeognatha (Machilis germanica, Dilta hibernica). To improve immunocytochemical resolution, we also performed preincubation experiments with 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan and serotonin. Additionally, we checked for immunolabeling of tryptophan hydroxylase, an enzyme associated with the synthesis of serotonin. Besides the generally identified groups of anterolateral, medial, and posterolateral neurons within each ganglion of the ventral nerve cord, we identified several other immunoreactive cells, which seem to have no correspondence in other tetraconates. Furthermore, we show that not all immunoreactive neurons produce serotonin, but have the capability for serotonin uptake. Comparisons with the patterns of serotonin-containing neurons in major tetraconate taxa suggest a close phylogenetic relationship of Remipedia, Cephalocarida, and Hexapoda, supporting the Miracrustacea hypothesis. J. Comp. Neurol., 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:79-115, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Funding information:
  • NIDA NIH HHS - K02 DA026990(United States)

Amyloid-like aggregation of provasopressin in diabetes insipidus and secretory granule sorting.

  • Beuret N
  • BMC Biol.
  • 2017 Jan 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Aggregation of peptide hormone precursors in the trans-Golgi network is an essential process in the biogenesis of secretory granules in endocrine cells. It has recently been proposed that this aggregation corresponds to the formation of functional amyloids. Our previous finding that dominant mutations in provasopressin, which cause cell degeneration and diabetes insipidus, prevent native folding and produce fibrillar aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) might thus reflect mislocalized amyloid formation by sequences that evolved to mediate granule sorting. RESULTS: Here we identified two sequences responsible for fibrillar aggregation of mutant precursors in the ER: the N-terminal vasopressin nonapeptide and the C-terminal glycopeptide. To test their role in granule sorting, the glycopeptide was deleted and/or vasopressin mutated to inactivate ER aggregation while still permitting precursor folding and ER exit. These mutations strongly reduced sorting into granules and regulated secretion in endocrine AtT20 cells. CONCLUSION: The same sequences - vasopressin and the glycopeptide - mediate physiological aggregation of the wild-type hormone precursor into secretory granules and the pathological fibrillar aggregation of disease mutants in the ER. These findings support the amyloid hypothesis for secretory granule biogenesis.

Artemisinins Target GABAA Receptor Signaling and Impair α Cell Identity.

  • Li J
  • Cell
  • 2017 Jan 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells, and generating new insulin-producing cells from other cell types is a major aim of regenerative medicine. One promising approach is transdifferentiation of developmentally related pancreatic cell types, including glucagon-producing α cells. In a genetic model, loss of the master regulatory transcription factor Arx is sufficient to induce the conversion of α cells to functional β-like cells. Here, we identify artemisinins as small molecules that functionally repress Arx by causing its translocation to the cytoplasm. We show that the protein gephyrin is the mammalian target of these antimalarial drugs and that the mechanism of action of these molecules depends on the enhancement of GABAA receptor signaling. Our results in zebrafish, rodents, and primary human pancreatic islets identify gephyrin as a druggable target for the regeneration of pancreatic β cell mass from α cells.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R01 HD084409(United States)

Pathogenic mycobacteria achieve cellular persistence by inhibiting the Niemann-Pick Type C disease cellular pathway.

  • Fineran P
  • Wellcome Open Res
  • 2016 Nov 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis remains a major global health concern. The ability to prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion is a key mechanism by which intracellular mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, achieve long-term persistence within host cells. The mechanisms underpinning this key intracellular pro-survival strategy remain incompletely understood. Host macrophages infected with persistent mycobacteria share phenotypic similarities with cells taken from patients suffering from Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NPC), a rare lysosomal storage disease in which endocytic trafficking defects and lipid accumulation within the lysosome lead to cell dysfunction and cell death. We investigated whether these shared phenotypes reflected an underlying mechanistic connection between mycobacterial intracellular persistence and the host cell pathway dysfunctional in NPC. METHODS: The induction of NPC phenotypes in macrophages from wild-type mice or obtained from healthy human donors was assessed via infection with mycobacteria and subsequent measurement of lipid levels and intracellular calcium homeostasis. The effect of NPC therapeutics on intracellular mycobacterial load was also assessed. RESULTS: Macrophages infected with persistent intracellular mycobacteria phenocopied NPC cells, exhibiting accumulation of multiple lipid types, reduced lysosomal Ca2+ levels, and defects in intracellular trafficking. These NPC phenotypes could also be induced using only lipids/glycomycolates from the mycobacterial cell wall. These data suggest that persistent intracellular mycobacteria inhibit the NPC pathway, likely via inhibition of the NPC1 protein, and subsequently induce altered acidic store Ca2+ homeostasis. Reduced lysosomal calcium levels may provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced levels of phagosome-lysosome fusion in mycobacterial infection. Treatments capable of correcting defects in NPC mutant cells via modulation of host cell calcium were of benefit in promoting clearance of mycobacteria from infected host cells. CONCLUSION : These findings provide a novel mechanistic explanation for mycobacterial intracellular persistence, and suggest that targeting interactions between the mycobacteria and host cell pathways may provide a novel avenue for development of anti-TB therapies.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - 084631()
  • Wellcome Trust - 202834()
  • Wellcome Trust - P30 AR069625()

Satb2 determines miRNA expression and long-term memory in the adult central nervous system.

  • Jaitner C
  • Elife
  • 2016 Nov 29

Literature context:


Abstract:

SATB2 is a risk locus for schizophrenia and encodes a DNA-binding protein that regulates higher-order chromatin configuration. In the adult brain Satb2 is almost exclusively expressed in pyramidal neurons of two brain regions important for memory formation, the cerebral cortex and the CA1-hippocampal field. Here we show that Satb2 is required for key hippocampal functions since deletion of Satb2 from the adult mouse forebrain prevents the stabilization of synaptic long-term potentiation and markedly impairs long-term fear and object discrimination memory. At the molecular level, we find that synaptic activity and BDNF up-regulate Satb2, which itself binds to the promoters of coding and non-coding genes. Satb2 controls the hippocampal levels of a large cohort of miRNAs, many of which are implicated in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Together, our findings demonstrate that Satb2 is critically involved in long-term plasticity processes in the adult forebrain that underlie the consolidation and stabilization of context-linked memory.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - R24RR024790(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R15 NS087606(United States)

Urocortin 2 But Not Urocortin 3 Promotes the Synaptic Formation in Hipppocampal Neurons via Induction of NGF Production by Astrocytes.

  • Zheng Y
  • Endocrinology
  • 2016 Mar 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

CRH family peptides play differential role during various physiological and pathophysiological responses, such as stress. Urocortins (UCNs) have been implicated to play complementary or contrasting actions for the effects of CRH during stress. It has been shown that activation of CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) results in decreased synapse formation in hippocampus. We therefore explored the effect of UCN2 and UCN3, the exclusive CRHR2 agonists, on synaptic formation in hippocampus. In hippocampal slices cultures, UCN2 but not UCN3 treatment increased the levels of presynaptic protein synapsinI and postsynaptic protein postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95), which was reversed by CRHR2 antagonist astressin 2B. In isolated hippocampal neurons, however, UCN2 decreased the numbers of synapsinI- and PSD95-labeled terminals/clusters via CRHR2. Treatment of hippocampal neurons with the media of UCN2-treated astrocytes led to an increase in synapsinI- and PSD95-labeled terminals. In neuron-astrocyte cocultures, UCN2 also enhanced the numbers and level of synapsinI- and PSD95-labeled terminals. These effects did not occur if glial cells were transfected with CRHR2 small interfering RNA. UCN2 but not UCN3 treatment induced nerve growth factor (NGF) production in astrocytes via CRHR2. The effects of the media of UCN2-treated glial cells on synapse formation in hippocampal neurons were prevented by administration of NGF receptor antagonists. Our data indicate that UCN2 promotes synapse formation in hippocampus via induction of NGF secretion from astrocytes. CRHR2 in glial cells mediates the stimulatory effects of CRH. Glia-neuron communication is critical for neuronal circuits remodeling and synaptic plasticity in response to neurohormones or neuromodulators.

Funding information:
  • NIBIB NIH HHS - R01 EB022573(United States)
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - R01ES016597-01A1(United States)

Neurotensin Is Coexpressed, Coreleased, and Acts Together With GLP-1 and PYY in Enteroendocrine Control of Metabolism.

  • Grunddal KV
  • Endocrinology
  • 2016 Jan 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

The 2 gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are well known to be coexpressed, costored, and released together to coact in the control of key metabolic target organs. However, recently, it became clear that several other gut hormones can be coexpressed in the intestinal-specific lineage of enteroendocrine cells. Here, we focus on the anatomical and functional consequences of the coexpression of neurotensin with GLP-1 and PYY in the distal small intestine. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, laser capture, and triple staining demonstrated that GLP-1 cells in the crypts become increasingly multihormonal, ie, coexpressing PYY and neurotensin as they move up the villus. Proglucagon promoter and pertussis toxin receptor-driven cell ablation and reappearance studies indicated that although all the cells die, the GLP-1 cells reappear more quickly than PYY- and neurotensin-positive cells. High-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that neurotensin is stored in secretory granules distinct from GLP-1 and PYY storing granules. Nevertheless, the 3 peptides were cosecreted from both perfused small intestines and colonic crypt cultures in response to a series of metabolite, neuropeptide, and hormonal stimuli. Importantly, neurotensin acts synergistically, ie, more than additively together with GLP-1 and PYY to decrease palatable food intake and inhibit gastric emptying, but affects glucose homeostasis in a more complex manner. Thus, neurotensin is a major gut hormone deeply integrated with GLP-1 and PYY, which should be taken into account when exploiting the enteroendocrine regulation of metabolism pharmacologically.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - P50 MH106934(United States)

Disrupted TSH Receptor Expression in Female Mouse Lung Fibroblasts Alters Subcellular IGF-1 Receptor Distribution.

  • Atkins SJ
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Dec 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

A relationship between the actions of TSH and IGF-1 was first recognized several decades ago. The close physical and functional associations between their respective receptors (TSHR and IGF-1R) has been described more recently in thyroid epithelium and human orbital fibroblasts as has the noncanonical behavior of IGF-1R. Here we report studies conducted in lung fibroblasts from female wild-type C57/B6 (TSHR(+/+)) mice and their littermates in which TSHR has been knocked out (TSHR(-/-)). Flow cytometric analysis revealed that cell surface IGF-1R levels are substantially lower in TSHR(-/-) fibroblasts compared with TSHR(+/+) fibroblasts. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed similar divergence with regard to both cytoplasmic and nuclear IGF-1R. Western blot analysis demonstrated both intact IGF-1R and receptor fragments in both cellular compartments. In contrast, IGF-1R mRNA levels were similar in fibroblasts from mice without and with intact TSHR expression. IGF-1 treatment of TSHR(+/+) fibroblasts resulted in reduced nuclear and cytoplasmic staining for IGF-1Rα, whereas it enhanced the nuclear signal in TSHR(-/-) cells. In contrast, IGF-1 enhanced cytoplasmic IGF-1Rβ in TSHR(-/-) fibroblasts while increasing the nuclear signal in TSHR(+/+) cells. These findings indicate the intimate relationship between TSHR and IGF-1R found earlier in human orbital fibroblasts also exists in mouse lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, the presence of TSHR in these fibroblasts influenced not only the levels of IGF-1R protein but also its subcellular distribution and response to IGF-1. They suggest that the mouse might serve as a suitable model for delineating the molecular mechanisms overarching these two receptors.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - T32 HL00710(United States)

Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of the G Protein-Coupled Receptor Repertoire of Gastric Somatostatin Cells.

  • Egerod KL
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Nov 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the stomach, somatostatin (SST) acts as a general paracrine negative regulator of exocrine secretion of gastric acid and pepsinogen and endocrine secretion of gastrin, ghrelin, and histamine. Using reporter mice expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) under control of the SST promotor, we have characterized the G protein-coupled receptors expressed in gastric Sst-RFP-positive cells and probed their effects on SST secretion in primary cell cultures. Surprisingly, besides SST, amylin and PYY were also highly enriched in the SST cells. Several receptors found to regulate SST secretion were highly expressed and/or enriched. 1) The metabolite receptors calcium-sensing receptor and free fatty acid receptor 4 (GPR120) functioned as positive and negative regulators, respectively. 2) Among the neurotransmitter receptors, adrenergic receptors α1a, α2a, α2b, and β1 were all highly expressed, with norepinephrine and isoproterenol acting as positive regulators. The muscarinic receptor M3 acted as a positive regulator, whereas M4 was conceivably a negative regulator. 3) Of the hormone receptors, the GLP-1 and GIP receptors, CCKb (stimulated by both CCK and gastrin) and surprisingly the melanocortin MC1 receptor were all positive regulators. 4) The neuropeptide receptors for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide acted as positive regulators, no effect was observed using galanin and nociceptin although transcripts for the corresponding receptors appeared highly expressed. 5) The SST receptors 1 and 2 functioned in an autocrine negative feedback loop. Thus, the article provides a comprehensive map of receptors through which SST secretion is regulated by hormones, neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and metabolites that act directly on the SST cells in the gastric mucosa.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK031036(United States)
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - T32 DK007319(United States)

KNDy Neurons Modulate the Magnitude of the Steroid-Induced Luteinizing Hormone Surges in Ovariectomized Rats.

  • Helena CV
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Nov 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

Kisspeptin is the most potent stimulator of LH release. There are two kisspeptin neuronal populations in the rodent brain: in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and in the arcuate nucleus. The arcuate neurons coexpress kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin and are called KNDy neurons. Because estradiol increases kisspeptin expression in the AVPV whereas it inhibits KNDy neurons, AVPV and KNDy neurons have been postulated to mediate the positive and negative feedback effects of estradiol on LH secretion, respectively. Yet the role of KNDy neurons during the positive feedback is not clear. In this study, ovariectomized rats were microinjected bilaterally into the arcuate nucleus with a saporin-conjugated neurokinin B receptor agonist for targeted ablation of approximately 70% of KNDy neurons. In oil-treated animals, ablation of KNDy neurons impaired the rise in LH after ovariectomy and kisspeptin content in both populations. In estradiol-treated animals, KNDy ablation did not influence the negative feedback of steroids during the morning. Surprisingly, KNDy ablation increased the steroid-induced LH surges, accompanied by an increase of kisspeptin content in the AVPV. This increase seems to be due to lack of dynorphin input from KNDy neurons to the AVPV as the following: 1) microinjections of a dynorphin antagonist into the AVPV significantly increased the LH surge in estradiol-treated rats, similar to KNDy ablation, and 2) intra-AVPV microinjections of dynorphin in KNDy-ablated rats restored LH surge levels. Our results suggest that KNDy neurons provide inhibition to AVPV kisspeptin neurons through dynorphin and thus regulate the amplitude of the steroid-induced LH surges.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS014841(United States)

Impact of Reduced ATGL-Mediated Adipocyte Lipolysis on Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in Male Mice.

  • Schoiswohl G
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Oct 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Emerging evidence suggests that impaired regulation of adipocyte lipolysis contributes to the proinflammatory immune cell infiltration of metabolic tissues in obesity, a process that is proposed to contribute to the development and exacerbation of insulin resistance. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we generated mice with adipocyte-specific deletion of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme catalyzing triacylglycerol hydrolysis. In contrast to previous models, adiponectin-driven Cre expression was used for targeted ATGL deletion. The resulting adipocyte-specific ATGL knockout (AAKO) mice were then characterized for metabolic and immune phenotypes. Lean and diet-induced obese AAKO mice had reduced adipocyte lipolysis, serum lipids, systemic lipid oxidation, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes in adipose tissue (AT) and liver. These changes did not increase overall body weight or fat mass in AAKO mice by 24 weeks of age, in part due to reduced expression of genes involved in lipid uptake, synthesis, and adipogenesis. Systemic glucose and insulin tolerance were improved in AAKO mice, primarily due to enhanced hepatic insulin signaling, which was accompanied by marked reduction in diet-induced hepatic steatosis as well as hepatic immune cell infiltration and activation. In contrast, although adipocyte ATGL deletion reduced AT immune cell infiltration in response to an acute lipolytic stimulus, it was not sufficient to ameliorate, and may even exacerbate, chronic inflammatory changes that occur in AT in response to diet-induced obesity.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY020533(United States)

Periostin induces pancreatic regeneration.

  • Smid JK
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 Mar 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

We found that the secreted protein periostin (Postn) is highly induced after partial pancreatectomy in regenerating areas containing mesenchymal stroma and tubular complexes. Importantly, after partial pancreatectomy, Postn-deficient mice exhibit impaired mesenchymal formation and reduced regeneration specifically within the pancreatic β-cell compartment. Furthermore, Postn-deficient mice demonstrate an increased sensitivity to streptozotocin. Notably, injection of Postn directly into the pancreas stimulated proliferation of vimentin-expressing cells within 24 hours, and by 3 days, a mesenchymal stroma was present containing proliferating duct-like cells expressing the progenitor markers Ngn3 and Pdx1. Intraperitoneal injection of Postn resulted in increased numbers of islets and long-term glucoregulatory benefits with no adverse effects found in other tissues. Delivery of Postn throughout the pancreas via the common bile duct resulted in increased numbers of small insulin-expressing clusters and a significant improvement in glucose tolerance. Therefore, Postn is novel molecule capable of potentiating pancreatic β-cell regeneration.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK055758(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS073981(United States)

Pancreatic duct ligation after almost complete β-cell loss: exocrine regeneration but no evidence of β-cell regeneration.

  • Cavelti-Weder C
  • Endocrinology
  • 2013 Dec 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

There has been great interest in the extent of β-cell regeneration after pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) and whether α- to β-cell conversion might account for β-cell regeneration after near-complete β-cell loss. To assess these questions, we established a PDL-model in adult male rats after almost complete beta-cell depletion achieved by giving a single high dose of streptozocin (STZ) in the fasted state. Because of the resultant severe diabetes, rats were given islet cell transplants to allow long-term follow-up. Although animals were followed up to 10 months, there was no meaningful β-cell regeneration, be it through replication, neogenesis, or α- to β-cell conversion. In contrast, the acinar cell compartment underwent massive changes with first severe acinar degeneration upon PDL injury followed by the appearance of pancreatic adipocytes, and finally near-complete reappearance of acini. We conclude that β-cells and acinar cells, although originating from the same precursors during development, have very distinct regenerative potentials in our PDL model in adult rats.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - T32 EY013933(United States)