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AffiniPure Fab Fragment Donkey Anti-Rabbit IgG (H+L) antibody

RRID:AB_2340587

Antibody ID

AB_2340587

Target Antigen

Rabbit IgG (H+L)

Proper Citation

(Jackson ImmunoResearch Labs Cat# 711-007-003, RRID:AB_2340587)

Clonality

polyclonal antibody

Comments

Originating manufacturer of this product

Vendor

Jackson ImmunoResearch Labs Go To Vendor

Cat Num

711-007-003

Publications that use this research resource

Detachment of Chain-Forming Neuroblasts by Fyn-Mediated Control of cell-cell Adhesion in the Postnatal Brain.

  • Fujikake K
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 May 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the rodent olfactory system, neuroblasts produced in the ventricular-subventricular zone of the postnatal brain migrate tangentially in chain-like cell aggregates toward the olfactory bulb (OB) through the rostral migratory stream (RMS). After reaching the OB, the chains are dissociated and the neuroblasts migrate individually and radially toward their final destination. The cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling cell-cell adhesion during this detachment remain unclear. Here we report that Fyn, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, regulates the detachment of neuroblasts from chains in the male and female mouse OB. By performing chemical screening and in vivo loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments, we found that Fyn promotes somal disengagement from the chains and is involved in neuronal migration from the RMS into the granule cell layer of the OB. Fyn knockdown or Dab1 (disabled-1) deficiency caused p120-catenin to accumulate and adherens junction-like structures to be sustained at the contact sites between neuroblasts. Moreover, a Fyn and N-cadherin double-knockdown experiment indicated that Fyn regulates the N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion between neuroblasts. These results suggest that the Fyn-mediated control of cell-cell adhesion is critical for the detachment of chain-forming neuroblasts in the postnatal OB.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the postnatal brain, newly born neurons (neuroblasts) migrate in chain-like cell aggregates toward their destination, where they are dissociated into individual cells and mature. The cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling the detachment of neuroblasts from chains are not understood. Here we show that Fyn, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, promotes the somal detachment of neuroblasts from chains, and that this regulation is critical for the efficient migration of neuroblasts to their destination. We further show that Fyn and Dab1 (disabled-1) decrease the cell-cell adhesion between chain-forming neuroblasts, which involves adherens junction-like structures. Our results suggest that Fyn-mediated regulation of the cell-cell adhesion of neuroblasts is critical for their detachment from chains in the postnatal brain.

Funding information:
  • NCCIH NIH HHS - 5R01AT006732(United States)

Radial Glial Fibers Promote Neuronal Migration and Functional Recovery after Neonatal Brain Injury.

  • Jinnou H
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2018 Jan 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Radial glia (RG) are embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) that produce neuroblasts and provide fibers that act as a scaffold for neuroblast migration during embryonic development. Although they normally disappear soon after birth, here we found that RG fibers can persist in injured neonatal mouse brains and act as a scaffold for postnatal ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ)-derived neuroblasts that migrate to the lesion site. This injury-induced maintenance of RG fibers has a limited time window during post-natal development and promotes directional saltatory movement of neuroblasts via N-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts that promote RhoA activation. Transplanting an N-cadherin-containing scaffold into injured neonatal brains likewise promotes migration and maturation of V-SVZ-derived neuroblasts, leading to functional improvements in impaired gait behaviors. Together these results suggest that RG fibers enable postnatal V-SVZ-derived neuroblasts to migrate toward sites of injury, thereby enhancing neuronal regeneration and functional recovery from neonatal brain injuries.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK082659(United States)

Immunocytochemical organization and sour taste activation in the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract of mice.

  • Stratford JM
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2017 Feb 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Sensory inputs from the oropharynx terminate in both the trigeminal brainstem complex and the rostral part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS). Taste information is conveyed via the facial and glossopharyngeal nerves, while general mucosal innervation is carried by the trigeminal and glossopharyngeal nerves. In contrast, the caudal nTS receives general visceral information largely from the vagus nerve. Although the caudal nTS shows clear morphological and molecularly delimited subdivisions, the rostral part does not. Thus, linking taste-induced patterns of activity to morphological subdivisions in the nTS is challenging. To test whether molecularly defined features of the rostral nTS correlate with patterns of taste-induced activity, we combined immunohistochemistry for markers of various visceral afferent and efferent systems with c-Fos-based activity maps generated by stimulation with a sour tastant, 30 mM citric acid. We further dissociated taste-related activity from activity arising from acid-sensitive general mucosal innervation by comparing acid-evoked c-Fos in wild-type and "taste blind" P2X2 /P2X3 double knockout (P2X-dbl KO) mice. In wild-type mice, citric acid stimulation evoked significant c-Fos activation in the central part of the rostral nTS-activity that was largely absent in the P2X-dbl KO mice. P2X-dbl KO mice, like wild-type mice, did exhibit acid-induced c-Fos activity in the dorsomedial trigeminal brainstem nucleus situated laterally adjacent to the rostral nTS. This dorsomedial nucleus also showed substantial innervation by trigeminal nerve fibers immunoreactive for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a marker for polymodal nociceptors, suggesting that trigeminal general mucosal innervation carries information about acids in the oral cavity. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:271-290, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.