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3c11 (SYNORF1) antibody

RRID:AB_2313867

Antibody ID

AB_2313867

Target Antigen

Proper Citation

(DSHB Cat# 3C11, RRID:AB_2313867)

Clonality

unknown

Vendor

DSHB

Cat Num

3C11

The BLOC-1 Subunit Pallidin Facilitates Activity-Dependent Synaptic Vesicle Recycling.

  • Chen X
  • eNeuro
  • 2017 Oct 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Membrane trafficking pathways must be exquisitely coordinated at synaptic terminals to maintain functionality, particularly during conditions of high activity. We have generated null mutations in the Drosophila homolog of pallidin, a central subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), to determine its role in synaptic development and physiology. We find that Pallidin localizes to presynaptic microtubules and cytoskeletal structures, and that the stability of Pallidin protein is highly dependent on the BLOC-1 components Dysbindin and Blos1. We demonstrate that the rapidly recycling vesicle pool is not sustained during high synaptic activity in pallidin mutants, leading to accelerated rundown and slowed recovery. Following intense activity, we observe a loss of early endosomes and a concomitant increase in tubular endosomal structures in synapses without Pallidin. Together, our data reveal that Pallidin subserves a key role in promoting efficient synaptic vesicle recycling and re-formation through early endosomes during sustained activity.

Age-associated increase of the active zone protein Bruchpilot within the honeybee mushroom body.

  • Gehring KB
  • PLoS ONE
  • 2017 Apr 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

In honeybees, age-associated structural modifications can be observed in the mushroom bodies. Prominent examples are the synaptic complexes (microglomeruli, MG) in the mushroom body calyces, which were shown to alter their size and density with age. It is not known whether the amount of intracellular synaptic proteins in the MG is altered as well. The presynaptic protein Bruchpilot (BRP) is localized at active zones and is involved in regulating the probability of neurotransmitter release in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we explored the localization of the honeybee BRP (Apis mellifera BRP, AmBRP) in the bee brain and examined age-related changes in the AmBRP abundance in the central bee brain and in microglomeruli of the mushroom body calyces. We report predominant AmBRP localization near the membrane of presynaptic boutons within the mushroom body MG. The relative amount of AmBRP was increased in the central brain of two-week old bees whereas the amount of Synapsin, another presynaptic protein involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release, shows an increase during the first two weeks followed by a decrease. In addition, we demonstrate an age-associated modulation of AmBRP located near the membrane of presynaptic boutons within MG located in mushroom body calyces where sensory input is conveyed to mushroom body intrinsic neurons. We discuss that the observed age-associated AmBRP modulation might be related to maturation processes or to homeostatic mechanisms that might help to maintain synaptic functionality in old animals.

Glomerular identification in the antennal lobe of the male moth Helicoverpa armigera.

  • Zhao XC
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2016 Oct 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

This study investigates anatomical organization of the antennal lobe (AL) glomeruli of the male cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera by synaptic antibody staining combined with three-dimensional reconstruction. To identify all glomeruli, their boundaries were accurately determined by means of several additional staining techniques visualizing the neuron categories forming the characteristic spherical neuropils. In total, 78-80 glomeruli were identified in the male H. armigera. The number of glomeruli was considerably larger than that previously reported in this species. Thus, compared with previous studies, we identified 15 new glomeruli, G63-G77. Most of them are located in the posterior part of the AL, which was previously considered to be a part of the protocerebrum. From the general anatomical organization of the AL glomeruli of H. armigera, we classified these neuropil structures into four groups, the macroglomerular complex, posterior complex, labial-palp pit organ glomerulus, and ordinary glomeruli. The complete identification of glomeruli is important for future studies seeking to explore further the coding mechanisms residing within the primary olfactory center of the moth brain. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2993-3013, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - P50 MH106934(United States)

Abundance of phosphorylated Apis mellifera CREB in the honeybee's mushroom body inner compact cells varies with age.

  • Gehring KB
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2016 Apr 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hymenopteran eusociality has been proposed to be associated with the activity of the transcription factor CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein). The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is a eusocial insect displaying a pronounced age-dependent division of labor. In honeybee brains, CREB-dependent genes are regulated in an age-dependent manner, indicating that there might be a role for neuronal honeybee CREB (Apis mellifera CREB, or AmCREB) in the bee's division of labor. In this study, we further explore this hypothesis by asking where in the honeybee brain AmCREB-dependent processes might take place and whether they vary with age in these brain regions. CREB is activated following phosphorylation at a conserved serine residue. An increase of phosphorylated CREB is therefore regarded as an indicator of CREB-dependent transcriptional activation. Thus, we here examine the localization of phosphorylated AmCREB (pAmCREB) in the brain and its age-dependent variability. We report prominent pAmCREB staining in a subpopulation of intrinsic neurons of the mushroom bodies. In these neurons, the inner compact cells (IC), pAmCREB is located in the nuclei, axons, and dendrites. In the central bee brain, the IC somata and their dendritic region, we observed an age-dependent increase of pAmCREB. Our results demonstrate the IC to be candidate neurons involved in age-dependent division of labor. We hypothesize that the IC display a high level of CREB-dependent transcription that might be related to neuronal and behavioral plasticity underlying a bee's foraging behavior.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - 1U24DK097771-01(United States)

Regeneration of olfactory afferent axons in the locust brain.

  • Stern M
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The insect olfactory system consists of thousands of sensory neurons on each antenna, which project into the primary olfactory center, the glomerular antennnal lobe. There, they form synapses with local interneurons and projection neurons, which relay olfactory information to the second-order olfactory center, the mushroom body. Olfactory afferents of adult locusts (Locusta migratoria) were axotomized by crushing the base of the antenna. We studied the resulting degeneration and regeneration in the antennal lobe by size measurements, anterograde dye labeling through the antennal nerve, and immunofluorescence staining of cell surface markers. Within 3 days postcrush, the antennal lobe size was reduced by 30% and from then onward regained size back to normal by 2 weeks postinjury. Concomitantly, anterograde labeling revealed regenerating afferents reaching the antennal lobe by day 4 postcrush, and reinnervating the olfactory neuropil almost back to normal within 2 weeks. Regenerated fibers were directed precisely into the antennal lobe, where they reinnervated glomeruli. As a remarkable exception, a few regenerating fibers projected erroneously into the mushroom body on a pathway that is normally chosen by second-order projection neurons. Regenerating afferents expressed the cell surface proteins lachesin and fasciclin I. The antennal lobe neuropil expressed the cell surface marker semaphorin 1a. In conclusion, axonal regeneration in the locust olfactory system appears to be possible, precise, and fast, opening the possibility of future functional and mechanistic studies.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - EY021222(United States)