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Mouse Anti-Human HuC / HuD neuronal protein Monoclonal Antibody, Unconjugated, Clone 16A11

RRID:AB_221448

Identification of NeuN immunopositive cells in the adult mouse subventricular zone.

  • Saito K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Aug 15

Literature context: fic, mouse monoclonal, A-21271, RRID:AB_221448 1:1000


Abstract:

In the adult rodent subventricular zone (SVZ), there are neural stem cells (NSCs) and the specialized neurogenic niche is critical to maintain their stemness. To date, many cellular and noncellular factors that compose the neurogenic niche and markers to identify subpopulations of Type A cells have been confirmed. In particular, neurotransmitters regulate adult neurogenesis and mature neurons in the SVZ have been only partially analyzed. Moreover, Type A cells, descendants of NSCs, are highly heterogeneous and more molecular markers are still needed to identify them. In the present study, we systematically classified NeuN, commonly used as a marker of mature and immature post-mitotic neurons, immunopositive (+) cells within the adult mouse SVZ. These SVZ-NeuN+ cells (SVZ-Ns) were mainly classified into two types. One was mature SVZ-Ns (M-SVZ-Ns). Neurochemical properties of M-SVZ-Ns were similar to those of striatal neurons, but their birth date and morphology were different. M-SVZ-Ns were generated during embryonic and early postnatal stages with bipolar peaks and extended their processes along the wall of the lateral ventricle. The second type was small SVZ-Ns (S-SVZ-Ns) with features of Type A cells. They expressed not only markers of Type A cells, but also proliferated and migrated from the SVZ to the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, S-SVZ-Ns could be classified into two types by their spatial locations and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression. Our data indicate that M-SVZ-Ns are a new component of the neurogenic niche and S-SVZ-Ns are newly identified subpopulations of Type A cells.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM102869-01(United States)

Evidence for neurogenesis in the medial cortex of the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

  • McDonald RP
  • Sci Rep
  • 2018 Jun 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Although lizards are often described as having robust neurogenic abilities, only a handful of the more than 6300 species have been explored. Here, we provide the first evidence of homeostatic neurogenesis in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius). We focused our study on the medial cortex, homologue of the mammalian hippocampal formation. Using immunostaining, we identified proliferating pools of neural stem/progenitor cells within the sulcus septomedialis, the pseudostratified ventricular zone adjacent to the medial cortex. Consistent with their identification as radial glia, these cells expressed SOX2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and Vimentin, and demonstrated a radial morphology. Using a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine cell tracking strategy, we determined that neuroblast migration from the ventricular zone to the medial cortex takes ~30-days, and that newly generated neuronal cells survived for at least 140-days. We also found that cell proliferation within the medial cortex was not significantly altered following rupture of the tail spinal cord (as a result of the naturally evolved process of caudal autotomy). We conclude that the sulcus septomedialis of the leopard gecko demonstrates all the hallmarks of a neurogenic niche.

Funding information:
  • Gouvernement du Canada | Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (Conseil de Recherches en Sciences Naturell - 400358()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA97063(United States)

Intracellular Calcium Mobilization Is Required for Sonic Hedgehog Signaling.

  • Klatt Shaw D
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 May 21

Literature context: uC/D ThermoFisher Cat# A-21271; RRID:AB_221448 F59 (mouse monoclonal anti-MYH1


Abstract:

Graded Shh signaling across fields of precursor cells coordinates patterns of gene expression, differentiation, and morphogenetic behavior as precursors form complex structures, such as the nervous system, the limbs, and craniofacial skeleton. Here we discover that intracellular calcium mobilization, a process tightly controlled and readily modulated, regulates the level of Shh-dependent gene expression in responding cells and affects the development of all Shh-dependent cell types in the zebrafish embryo. Reduced expression or modified activity of ryanodine receptor (RyR) intracellular calcium release channels shifted the allocation of Shh-dependent cell fates in the somitic muscle and neural tube. Mosaic analysis revealed that RyR-mediated calcium mobilization is required specifically in Shh ligand-receiving cells. This work reveals that RyR channels participate in intercellular signal transduction events. As modulation of RyR activity modifies tissue patterning, we hypothesize that alterations in intracellular calcium mobilization contribute to both birth defects and evolutionary modifications of morphology.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI043458(United States)

TRPV4 Channel Signaling in Macrophages Promotes Gastrointestinal Motility via Direct Effects on Smooth Muscle Cells.

  • Luo J
  • Immunity
  • 2018 May 30

Literature context: trogen Cat# A21271; RRID:AB_221448 Anti-mouse ANO1, Purified abcam


Abstract:

Intestinal macrophages are critical for gastrointestinal (GI) homeostasis, but our understanding of their role in regulating intestinal motility is incomplete. Here, we report that CX3C chemokine receptor 1-expressing muscularis macrophages (MMs) were required to maintain normal GI motility. MMs expressed the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel, which senses thermal, mechanical, and chemical cues. Selective pharmacologic inhibition of TRPV4 or conditional deletion of TRPV4 from macrophages decreased intestinal motility and was sufficient to reverse the GI hypermotility that is associated with chemotherapy treatment. Mechanistically, stimulation of MMs via TRPV4 promoted the release of prostaglandin E2 and elicited colon contraction in a paracrine manner via prostaglandin E receptor signaling in intestinal smooth muscle cells without input from the enteric nervous system. Collectively, our data identify TRPV4-expressing MMs as an essential component required for maintaining normal GI motility and provide potential drug targets for GI motility disorders.

Funding information:
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - K08 AR065577()
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR070116()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK052574()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK103901()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM101218()
  • Wellcome Trust - HD052745(United Kingdom)

In Vivo Analysis of the Neurovascular Niche in the Developing Xenopus Brain.

  • Lau M
  • eNeuro
  • 2018 May 3

Literature context: antibody (Invitrogen, #A-21271, RRID:AB_221448) at 1:250 in block, for 2 h at


Abstract:

The neurovascular niche is a specialized microenvironment formed by the interactions between neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and the vasculature. While it is thought to regulate adult neurogenesis by signaling through vascular-derived soluble cues or contacted-mediated cues, less is known about the neurovascular niche during development. In Xenopus laevis tadpole brain, NPCs line the ventricle and extend radial processes tipped with endfeet to the vascularized pial surface. Using in vivo labeling and time-lapse imaging in tadpoles, we find that intracardial injection of fluorescent tracers rapidly labels Sox2/3-expressing NPCs and that vascular-circulating molecules are endocytosed by NPC endfeet. Confocal imaging indicates that about half of the endfeet appear to appose the vasculature, and time-lapse analysis of NPC proliferation and endfeet-vascular interactions suggest that proliferative activity does not correlate with stable vascular apposition. Together, these findings characterize the neurovascular niche in the developing brain and suggest that, while signaling to NPCs may occur through vascular-derived soluble cues, stable contact between NPC endfeet and the vasculature is not required for developmental neurogenesis.

Neuronal expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor in the injured telencephalon of adult zebrafish.

  • Cacialli P
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Mar 1

Literature context: RRID:AB_221448 Anti-Human HuC/HuD neuronal pro


Abstract:

The reparative ability of the central nervous system varies widely in the animal kingdom. In the mammalian brain, the regenerative mechanisms are very limited and newly formed neurons do not survive longer, probably due to a non-suitable local environment. On the opposite, fish can repair the brain after injury, with fast and complete recovery of damaged area. The brain of zebrafish, a teleost fish widely used as vertebrate model, also possesses high regenerative properties after injury. Taking advantage of this relevant model, the aim of the present study was to investigate the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the regenerative ability of adult brain, after stab wound telencephalic injury. BDNF is involved in many brain functions and plays key roles in the repair process after traumatic brain lesions. It has been reported that BDNF strengthens the proliferative activity of neuronal precursor cells, facilitates the neuronal migration toward injured areas, and shows survival properties due to its anti-apoptotic effects. BDNF mRNA levels, assessed by quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization at 1, 4, 7, and 15 days after the lesion, were increased in the damaged telencephalon, mostly suddenly after the lesion. Double staining using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry revealed that BDNF mRNA was restricted to cells identified as mature neurons. BDNF mRNA expressing neurons mostly increased in the area around the lesion, showing a peak 1 day after the lesion. Taken together, these results highlight the role of BDNF in brain repair processes and reinforce the value of zebrafish for the study of regenerative neurogenesis.

Movement maintains forebrain neurogenesis via peripheral neural feedback in larval zebrafish.

  • Hall ZJ
  • Elife
  • 2018 Mar 12

Literature context: Waltham, Massachusetts A-21271; RRID:AB_221448 Antibody mouse anti-PCNA Invitr


Abstract:

The postembryonic brain exhibits experience-dependent development, in which sensory experience guides normal brain growth. This neuroplasticity is thought to occur primarily through structural and functional changes in pre-existing neurons. Whether neurogenesis also mediates the effects of experience on brain growth is unclear. Here, we characterized the importance of motor experience on postembryonic neurogenesis in larval zebrafish. We found that movement maintains an expanded pool of forebrain neural precursors by promoting progenitor self-renewal over the production of neurons. Physical cues associated with swimming (bodily movement) increase neurogenesis and these cues appear to be conveyed by dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in the zebrafish body: DRG-deficient larvae exhibit attenuated neurogenic responses to movement and targeted photoactivation of DRG in immobilized larvae expands the pallial pool of proliferative cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of movement in neurogenic brain growth and reveal a fundamental sensorimotor association that may couple early motor and brain development.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - (United Kingdom)
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada - Discovery grant (RGPIN-2016-06325)()
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada - Post-doctoral fellowship (PDF 454019-2014)()

Neural stem/progenitor cells are activated during tail regeneration in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius).

  • Gilbert EAB
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Feb 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

As for many lizards, the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) can self-detach its tail to avoid predation and then regenerate a replacement. The replacement tail includes a regenerated spinal cord with a simple morphology: an ependymal layer surrounded by nerve tracts. We hypothesized that cells within the ependymal layer of the original spinal cord include populations of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) that contribute to the regenerated spinal cord. Prior to tail loss, we performed a bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase experiment and found that a subset of ependymal layer cells (ELCs) were label-retaining after a 140-day chase period. Next, we conducted a detailed spatiotemporal characterization of these cells before, during, and after tail regeneration. Our findings show that SOX2, a hallmark protein of NSPCs, is constitutively expressed by virtually all ELCs before, during, and after regeneration. We also found that during regeneration, ELCs express an expanded panel of NSPC and lineage-restricted progenitor cell markers, including MSI-1, SOX9, and TUJ1. Using electron microscopy, we determined that multiciliated, uniciliated, and biciliated cells are present, although the latter was only observed in regenerated spinal cords. Our results demonstrate that cells within the ependymal layer of the original, regenerating and fully regenerate spinal cord represent a heterogeneous population. These include radial glia comparable to Type E and Type B cells, and a neuronal-like population of cerebrospinal fluid-contacting cells. We propose that spinal cord regeneration in geckos represents a truncation of the restorative trajectory observed in some urodeles and teleosts, resulting in the formation of a structurally distinct replacement.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01DK083485(United States)

Activating the regenerative potential of Müller glia cells in a regeneration-deficient retina.

  • Lust K
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jan 29

Literature context: ","term_text":"A21271"}}A21271, RRID: AB_2214481: 200Antibodyanti-GS (mouse, mo


Abstract:

Regeneration responses in animals are widespread across phyla. To identify molecular players that confer regenerative capacities to non-regenerative species is of key relevance for basic research and translational approaches. Here, we report a differential response in retinal regeneration between medaka (Oryzias latipes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). In contrast to zebrafish, medaka Müller glia (olMG) cells behave like progenitors and exhibit a restricted capacity to regenerate the retina. After injury, olMG cells proliferate but fail to self-renew and ultimately only restore photoreceptors. In our injury paradigm, we observed that in contrast to zebrafish, proliferating olMG cells do not maintain sox2 expression. Sustained sox2 expression in olMG cells confers regenerative responses similar to those of zebrafish MG (drMG) cells. We show that a single, cell-autonomous factor reprograms olMG cells and establishes a regeneration-like mode. Our results position medaka as an attractive model to delineate key regeneration factors with translational potential.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH073991(United States)

Non-Newly Generated, "Immature" Neurons in the Sheep Brain Are Not Restricted to Cerebral Cortex.

  • Piumatti M
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jan 24

Literature context: HuC/D Mouse 1:800 RRID:AB_221448 Invitrogen


Abstract:

A newly proposed form of brain structural plasticity consists of non-newly generated, "immature" neurons of the adult cerebral cortex. Similar to newly generated neurons, these cells express the cytoskeletal protein Doublecortin (DCX), yet they are generated prenatally and then remain in a state of immaturity for long periods. In rodents, the immature neurons are restricted to the paleocortex, whereas in other mammals, they are also found in neocortex. Here, we analyzed the DCX-expressing cells in the whole sheep brain of both sexes to search for an indicator of structural plasticity at a cellular level in a relatively large-brained, long-living mammal. Brains from adult and newborn sheep (injected with BrdU and analyzed at different survival times) were processed for DCX, cell proliferation markers (Ki-67, BrdU), pallial/subpallial developmental origin (Tbr1, Sp8), and neuronal/glial antigens for phenotype characterization. We found immature-like neurons in the whole sheep cortex and in large populations of DCX-expressing cells within the external capsule and the surrounding gray matter (claustrum and amygdala). BrdU and Ki-67 detection at neonatal and adult ages showed that all of these DCX+ cells were generated during embryogenesis, not after birth. These results show that the adult sheep, unlike rodents, is largely endowed with non-newly generated neurons retaining immature features, suggesting that such plasticity might be particularly important in large-brained, long-living mammals.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain plasticity is important in adaptation and brain repair. Structural changes span from synaptic plasticity to adult neurogenesis, the latter being highly reduced in large-brained, long-living mammals (e.g., humans). The cerebral cortex contains "immature" neurons, which are generated prenatally and then remain in an undifferentiated state for long periods, being detectable with markers of immaturity. We studied the distribution and developmental origin of these cells in the whole brain of sheep, relatively large-brained, long-living mammals. In addition to the expected cortical location, we also found populations of non-newly generated neurons in several subcortical regions (external capsule, claustrum, and amygdala). These results suggests that non-neurogenic, parenchymal structural plasticity might be more important in large mammals with respect to adult neurogenesis.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - N01-AI-40096(United States)

A critical period for the trophic actions of leptin on AgRP neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

  • Kamitakahara A
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Jan 1

Literature context: otein Molecular Probes, A21271, RRID:AB_221448, Mouse Monoclonal 1:500


Abstract:

In the developing hypothalamus, the fat-derived hormone leptin stimulates the growth of axons from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) to other regions that control energy balance. These projections are significantly reduced in leptin deficient (Lepob/ob ) mice and this phenotype is largely rescued by neonatal leptin treatments. However, treatment of mature Lepob/ob mice is ineffective, suggesting that the trophic action of leptin is limited to a developmental critical period. To temporally delineate closure of this critical period for leptin-stimulated growth, we treated Lepob/ob mice with exogenous leptin during a variety of discrete time periods, and measured the density of Agouti-Related Peptide (AgRP) containing projections from the ARH to the ventral part of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMHv), and to the medial parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus (PVHmp). The results indicate that leptin loses its neurotrophic potential at or near postnatal day 28. The duration of leptin exposure appears to be important, with 9- or 11-day treatments found to be more effective than shorter (5-day) treatments. Furthermore, leptin treatment for 9 days or more was sufficient to restore AgRP innervation to both the PVHmp and DMHv in Lepob/ob females, but only to the DMHv in Lepob/ob males. Together, these findings reveal that the trophic actions of leptin are contingent upon timing and duration of leptin exposure, display both target and sex specificity, and that modulation of leptin-dependent circuit formation by each of these factors may carry enduring consequences for feeding behavior, metabolism, and obesity risk.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01 CA073992(United States)

Zebrafish Regulatory T Cells Mediate Organ-Specific Regenerative Programs.

  • Hui SP
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Dec 18

Literature context: Fisher Scientific Cat# A-21271; RRID:AB_221448 Rabbit polyclonal anti-Mef2 (C-


Abstract:

The attenuation of ancestral pro-regenerative pathways may explain why humans do not efficiently regenerate damaged organs. Vertebrate lineages that exhibit robust regeneration, including the teleost zebrafish, provide insights into the maintenance of adult regenerative capacity. Using established models of spinal cord, heart, and retina regeneration, we discovered that zebrafish Treg-like (zTreg) cells rapidly homed to damaged organs. Conditional ablation of zTreg cells blocked organ regeneration by impairing precursor cell proliferation. In addition to modulating inflammation, infiltrating zTreg cells stimulated regeneration through interleukin-10-independent secretion of organ-specific regenerative factors (Ntf3: spinal cord; Nrg1: heart; Igf1: retina). Recombinant regeneration factors rescued the regeneration defects associated with zTreg cell depletion, whereas Foxp3a-deficient zTreg cells infiltrated damaged organs but failed to express regenerative factors. Our data delineate organ-specific roles for Treg cells in maintaining pro-regenerative capacity that could potentially be harnessed for diverse regenerative therapies.

Funding information:
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - ES016005(United States)

Molecular Anatomy of the Developing Human Retina.

  • Hoshino A
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Dec 18

Literature context: ELAVL3/4 Invitrogen A-21271; RRID:AB_221448 GNAO1 Chemicon Mab3073


Abstract:

Clinical and genetic heterogeneity associated with retinal diseases makes stem-cell-based therapies an attractive strategy for personalized medicine. However, we have limited understanding of the timing of key events in the developing human retina, and in particular the factors critical for generating the unique architecture of the fovea and surrounding macula. Here we define three key epochs in the transcriptome dynamics of human retina from fetal day (D) 52 to 136. Coincident histological analyses confirmed the cellular basis of transcriptional changes and highlighted the dramatic acceleration of development in the fovea compared with peripheral retina. Human and mouse retinal transcriptomes show remarkable similarity in developmental stages, although morphogenesis was greatly expanded in humans. Integration of DNA accessibility data allowed us to reconstruct transcriptional networks controlling photoreceptor differentiation. Our studies provide insights into human retinal development and serve as a resource for molecular staging of human stem-cell-derived retinal organoids.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA EY000450-09()
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA EY000474-08()
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA EY000546-02()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01CA40046(United States)
  • NEI NIH HHS - F32 EY025117()
  • NEI NIH HHS - Z01 EY000450()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - R24 HD000836()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - P01 GM081619()

Striatal adenosine A2A receptor neurons control active-period sleep via parvalbumin neurons in external globus pallidus.

  • Yuan XS
  • Elife
  • 2017 Oct 12

Literature context: er: A-21271, Life Technologies, RRID:AB_221448), and goat anti-forkhead box pr


Abstract:

Dysfunction of the striatum is frequently associated with sleep disturbances. However, its role in sleep-wake regulation has been paid little attention even though the striatum densely expresses adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs), which are essential for adenosine-induced sleep. Here we showed that chemogenetic activation of A2AR neurons in specific subregions of the striatum induced a remarkable increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Anatomical mapping and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that striatal A2AR neurons innervated the external globus pallidus (GPe) in a topographically organized manner and preferentially formed inhibitory synapses with GPe parvalbumin (PV) neurons. Moreover, lesions of GPe PV neurons abolished the sleep-promoting effect of striatal A2AR neurons. In addition, chemogenetic inhibition of striatal A2AR neurons led to a significant decrease of NREM sleep at active period, but not inactive period of mice. These findings reveal a prominent contribution of striatal A2AR neuron/GPe PV neuron circuit in sleep control.

RING Finger Protein 38 Is a Neuronal Protein in the Brain of Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

  • Cham KL
  • Front Neuroanat
  • 2017 Sep 15

Literature context: HuC/D antiserum (1:500, A21271, RRID:AB_221448, Thermo Fisher Scientific) or p


Abstract:

Really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein is a type of zinc-binding motif found in a large family of functionally distinct proteins. RING finger proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes including apoptosis, DNA repair, cell cycle, signal transduction, tumour suppressor, vesicular transport, and peroxisomal biogenesis. RING finger protein 38 (RNF38) is a member of the family whose functions remain unknown. To gain insight into the putative effects of RNF38 in the central nervous system, we localised its expression. The aim of this study was to identify the neuroanatomical location(s) of rnf38 mRNA and its peptide, determine the type of RNF38-expressing cells, and measure rnf38 gene expression in the brain of male tilapia. The distributions of rnf38 mRNA and its peptide were visualised using in situ hybridisation with digoxigenin-labelled RNA antisense and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Both were identically distributed throughout the brain, including the telencephalon, preoptic area, optic tectum, hypothalamus, cerebellum, and the hindbrain. Double-labelling immunocytochemistry for RNF38 and the neuronal marker HuC/D showed that most but not all RNF38 protein was expressed in neuronal nuclei. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed the highest level of rnf38 mRNA in the midbrain, followed by the preoptic area, cerebellum, optic tectum, telencephalon, hindbrain and hypothalamus. These findings reveal a differential spatial pattern of RNF38 in the tilapia brain, suggesting that it has potentially diverse functions related to neuronal activity.

Neuronal connections of the central amygdalar nucleus with refeeding-activated brain areas in rats.

  • Zséli G
  • Brain Struct Funct
  • 2017 Aug 31

Literature context: ouse, monoclonal, #cat. A-21271 RRID:AB_221448 1:500


Abstract:

Following fasting, satiety is accompanied by neuronal activation in brain areas including the central amygdalar nucleus (CEA). Since CEA is known to inhibit food intake, we hypothesized that CEA contributes to the termination of meal during refeeding. To better understand the organization of this satiety-related circuit, the interconnections of the CEA with refeeding-activated neuronal groups were elucidated using retrograde (cholera toxin-β subunit, CTB) and anterograde (phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, PHA-L) tracers in male rats. C-Fos-immunoreactivity was used as marker of neuronal activation. The refeeding-activated input of the CEA primarily originated from the paraventricular thalamic, parasubthalamic and parabrachial nuclei. Few CTB-c-Fos double-labeled neurons were detected in the prefrontal cortex, lateral hypothalamic area, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BNST). Only few refeeding-activated proopiomelanocortin-producing neurons of the arcuate nucleus projected to the CEA. Anterograde tract tracing revealed a high density of PHAL-labeled axons contacted with refeeding-activated neurons in the BNST, lateral hypothalamic area, parasubthalamic, paraventricular thalamic and parabrachial nuclei and NTS; a low density of labeled axons was found in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Chemogenetic activation of the medial CEA (CEAm) inhibited food intake during the first hour of refeeding, while activation of lateral CEA had no effect. These data demonstrate the existence of reciprocal connections between the CEA and distinct refeeding-activated hypothalamic, thalamic and brainstem nuclei, suggesting the importance of short feedback loops in the regulation of satiety and importance of the CEAm in the regulation of food intake during refeeding.

Live calcium and mitochondrial imaging in the enteric nervous system of Parkinson patients and controls.

  • Desmet AS
  • Elife
  • 2017 Aug 21

Literature context: lar Probes, Merelbeke, Belgium, RRID:AB_221448), were used after 2 hr (at RT)


Abstract:

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with motor and non-motor symptoms, including constipation. Therefore, several studies have investigated the gastrointestinal tract, and more specifically the enteric nervous system (ENS), in search of an early biomarker of PD. Besides α-synuclein aggregation, mitochondrial dysfunction and dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration probably contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Here we assessed neuronal and mitochondrial functioning in primary enteric neurons of PD patients and their healthy partners as controls. Using a unique combination of live microscopy techniques, applied to routine duodenum biopsies, we were able to record neuronal Ca2+ responses and mitochondrial membrane potential in these nerve tissues. We found that submucous neurons were not affected in PD patients, which suggests that these neurons are not involved in the pathogenesis or the gastrointestinal symptoms of PD. Our study provides for the first time functional information on live neurons in PD patients.

Spontaneous calcium waves in the developing enteric nervous system.

  • Hao MM
  • Dev. Biol.
  • 2017 May 1

Literature context: s A21271, RRID:AB_221448)(Hendricks


Abstract:

The enteric nervous system (ENS) is an extensive network of neurons in the gut wall that arises from neural crest-derived cells. Like other populations of neural crest cells, it is known that enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCCs) influence the behaviour of each other and therefore must communicate. However, little is known about how ENCCs communicate with each other. In this study, we used Ca2+ imaging to examine communication between ENCCs in the embryonic gut, using mice where ENCCs express a genetically-encoded calcium indicator. Spontaneous propagating calcium waves were observed between neighbouring ENCCs, through both neuronal and non-neuronal ENCCs. Pharmacological experiments showed wave propagation was not mediated by gap junctions, but by purinergic signalling via P2 receptors. The expression of several P2X and P2Y receptors was confirmed using RT-PCR. Furthermore, inhibition of P2 receptors altered the morphology of the ENCC network, without affecting neuronal differentiation or ENCC proliferation. It is well established that purines participate in synaptic transmission in the mature ENS. Our results describe, for the first time, purinergic signalling between ENCCs during pre-natal development, which plays roles in the propagation of Ca2+ waves between ENCCs and in ENCC network formation. One previous study has shown that calcium signalling plays a role in sympathetic ganglia formation; our results suggest that calcium waves are likely to be important for enteric ganglia development.

SOX9 Is an Astrocyte-Specific Nuclear Marker in the Adult Brain Outside the Neurogenic Regions.

  • Sun W
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Apr 26

Literature context: ; R&D Systems), mouse anti-HuD (A21271; 1:200; Invitrogen), rabbit ant


Abstract:

Astrocytes have in recent years become the focus of intense experimental interest, yet markers for their definitive identification remain both scarce and imperfect. Astrocytes may be recognized as such by their expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, glutamine synthetase, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1), aquaporin-4, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family member L1, and other proteins. However, these proteins may all be regulated both developmentally and functionally, restricting their utility. To identify a nuclear marker pathognomonic of astrocytic phenotype, we assessed differential RNA expression by FACS-purified adult astrocytes and, on that basis, evaluated the expression of the transcription factor SOX9 in both mouse and human brain. We found that SOX9 is almost exclusively expressed by astrocytes in the adult brain except for ependymal cells and in the neurogenic regions, where SOX9 is also expressed by neural progenitor cells. Transcriptome comparisons of SOX9+ cells with GLT1+ cells showed that the two populations of cells exhibit largely overlapping gene expression. Expression of SOX9 did not decrease during aging and was instead upregulated by reactive astrocytes in a number of settings, including a murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SOD1G93A), middle cerebral artery occlusion, and multiple mini-strokes. We quantified the relative number of astrocytes using the isotropic fractionator technique in combination with SOX9 immunolabeling. The analysis showed that SOX9+ astrocytes constitute ∼10-20% of the total cell number in most CNS regions, a smaller fraction of total cell number than previously estimated in the normal adult brain.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes are traditionally identified immunohistochemically by antibodies that target cell-specific antigens in the cytosol or plasma membrane. We show here that SOX9 is an astrocyte-specific nuclear marker in all major areas of the CNS outside of the neurogenic regions. Based on SOX9 immunolabeling, we document that astrocytes constitute a smaller fraction of total cell number than previously estimated in the normal adult mouse brain.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG048769()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - P01 HD076892()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH104701()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS075177()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS078167()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS100366()

Non-nuclear Pool of Splicing Factor SFPQ Regulates Axonal Transcripts Required for Normal Motor Development.

  • Thomas-Jinu S
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Apr 19

Literature context: t#A21271; RRID:AB_221448 α-bungarot


Abstract:

Recent progress revealed the complexity of RNA processing and its association to human disorders. Here, we unveil a new facet of this complexity. Complete loss of function of the ubiquitous splicing factor SFPQ affects zebrafish motoneuron differentiation cell autonomously. In addition to its nuclear localization, the protein unexpectedly localizes to motor axons. The cytosolic version of SFPQ abolishes motor axonal defects, rescuing key transcripts, and restores motility in the paralyzed sfpq null mutants, indicating a non-nuclear processing role in motor axons. Novel variants affecting the conserved coiled-coil domain, so far exclusively found in fALS exomes, specifically affect the ability of SFPQ to localize in axons. They broadly rescue morphology and motility in the zebrafish mutant, but alter motor axon morphology, demonstrating functional requirement for axonal SFPQ. Altogether, we uncover the axonal function of the splicing factor SFPQ in motor development and highlight the importance of the coiled-coil domain in this process. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

Neurogenic Radial Glia-like Cells in Meninges Migrate and Differentiate into Functionally Integrated Neurons in the Neonatal Cortex.

  • Bifari F
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2017 Mar 2

Literature context: #A-21271, RRID:AB_221448 Rabbit pol


Abstract:

Whether new neurons are added in the postnatal cerebral cortex is still debated. Here, we report that the meninges of perinatal mice contain a population of neurogenic progenitors formed during embryonic development that migrate to the caudal cortex and differentiate into Satb2+ neurons in cortical layers II-IV. The resulting neurons are electrically functional and integrated into local microcircuits. Single-cell RNA sequencing identified meningeal cells with distinct transcriptome signatures characteristic of (1) neurogenic radial glia-like cells (resembling neural stem cells in the SVZ), (2) neuronal cells, and (3) a cell type with an intermediate phenotype, possibly representing radial glia-like meningeal cells differentiating to neuronal cells. Thus, we have identified a pool of embryonically derived radial glia-like cells present in the meninges that migrate and differentiate into functional neurons in the neonatal cerebral cortex.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS036715(United States)

Arundic Acid Prevents Developmental Upregulation of S100B Expression and Inhibits Enteric Glial Development.

  • Hao MM
  • Front Cell Neurosci
  • 2017 Mar 10

Literature context: s A21271; RRID:AB_221448); goat ant


Abstract:

S100B is expressed in various types of glial cells and is involved in regulating many aspects of their function. However, little is known about its role during nervous system development. In this study, we investigated the effect of inhibiting the onset of S100B synthesis in the development of the enteric nervous system, a network of neurons and glia located in the wall of the gut that is vital for control of gastrointestinal function. Intact gut explants were taken from embryonic day (E)13.5 mice, the day before the first immunohistochemical detection of S100B, and cultured in the presence of arundic acid, an inhibitor of S100B synthesis, for 48 h. The effects on Sox10-immunoreactive enteric neural crest progenitors and Hu-immunoreactive enteric neurons were then analyzed. Culture in arundic acid reduced the proportion of Sox10+ cells and decreased cell proliferation. There was no change in the density of Hu+ enteric neurons, however, a small population of cells exhibited atypical co-expression of both Sox10 and Hu, which was not observed in control cultures. Addition of exogenous S100B to the cultures did not change Sox10+ cell numbers. Overall, our data suggest that cell-intrinsic intracellular S100B is important for maintaining Sox10 and proliferation of the developing enteric glial lineage.

Differential Routing of Mindbomb1 via Centriolar Satellites Regulates Asymmetric Divisions of Neural Progenitors.

  • Tozer S
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Feb 8

Literature context: t#A-21271 RRID:AB_221448 Mouse anti


Abstract:

Unequal centrosome maturation correlates with asymmetric division in multiple cell types. Nevertheless, centrosomal fate determinants have yet to be identified. Here, we show that the Notch pathway regulator Mindbomb1 co-localizes asymmetrically with centriolar satellite proteins PCM1 and AZI1 at the daughter centriole in interphase. Remarkably, while PCM1 and AZI1 remain asymmetric during mitosis, Mindbomb1 is associated with either one or both spindle poles. Asymmetric Mindbomb1 correlates with neurogenic divisions and Mindbomb1 is inherited by the prospective neuron. By contrast, in proliferative divisions, a supplementary pool of Mindbomb1 associated with the Golgi apparatus in interphase is released during mitosis and compensates for Mindbomb1 centrosomal asymmetry. Finally, we show that preventing Mindbomb1 centrosomal association induces reciprocal Notch activation between sister cells and promotes symmetric divisions. Thus, we uncover a link between differential centrosome maturation and Notch signaling and reveal an unexpected compensatory mechanism involving the Golgi apparatus in restoring symmetry in proliferative divisions.

MicroRNA miR-29 controls a compensatory response to limit neuronal iron accumulation during adult life and aging.

  • Ripa R
  • BMC Biol.
  • 2017 Feb 13

Literature context: # A-21271 RRID:AB_221448), Anti-GFP


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: A widespread modulation of gene expression occurs in the aging brain, but little is known as to the upstream drivers of these changes. MicroRNAs emerged as fine regulators of gene expression in many biological contexts and they are modulated by age. MicroRNAs may therefore be part of the upstream drivers of the global gene expression modulation correlated with aging and aging-related phenotypes. RESULTS: Here, we show that microRNA-29 (miR-29) is induced during aging in short-lived turquoise killifish brain and genetic antagonism of its function induces a gene-expression signature typical of aging. Mechanicistically, we identified Ireb2 (a master gene for intracellular iron delivery that encodes for IRP2 protein), as a novel miR-29 target. MiR-29 is induced by iron loading and, in turn, it reduces IRP2 expression in vivo, therefore limiting intracellular iron delivery in neurons. Genetically modified fish with neuro-specific miR-29 deficiency exhibit increased levels of IRP2 and transferrin receptor, increased iron content, and oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that age-dependent miR-29 upregulation is an adaptive mechanism that counteracts the expression of some aging-related phenotypes and its anti-aging activity is primarily exerted by regulating intracellular iron homeostasis limiting excessive iron-exposure in neurons.

Variable proopiomelanocortin expression in tanycytes of the adult rat hypothalamus and pituitary stalk.

  • Wittmann G
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2017 Feb 15

Literature context: , A21271, RRID:AB_221448 Mouse mono


Abstract:

It is generally believed that proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is expressed exclusively by neurons in the adult rodent brain. Unbeknownst to most researchers, however, Pomc in situ hybridization studies in the rat show specific labeling in the ventral wall of the hypothalamic third ventricle, which is formed by specialized ependymal cells, called tanycytes. Here we characterized this non-neuronal POMC expression in detail using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical techniques, and report two unique characteristics. First, POMC mRNA and precursor protein expression in non-neuronal cells varies to a great degree as to the extent and abundance of expression. In brains with low-level expression, POMC mRNA and protein was largely confined to a population of tanycytes within the infundibular stalk/caudal median eminence, termed here γ tanycytes, and a subset of closely located β and α2 tanycytes. In brains with high-level expression, POMC mRNA and protein was observed in the vast majority of α2, β, and γ tanycytes. This variability was observed in both adult males and females; of 41 rats between 8 and 15 weeks of age, 17 had low-, 9 intermediate-, and 15 high-level POMC expression in tanycytes. Second, unlike other known POMC-expressing cells, tanycytes rarely contained detectable levels of adrenocorticotropin or α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. The results indicate either a dynamic spatiotemporal pattern whereby low and high POMC syntheses in tanycytes occur periodically in each brain, or marked interindividual differences that may persist throughout adulthood. Future studies are required to examine these possibilities and elucidate the physiologic importance of POMC in tanycytes. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:411-441, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Elucidation of the anatomy of a satiety network: Focus on connectivity of the parabrachial nucleus in the adult rat.

  • Zséli G
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2016 Oct 1

Literature context: RRID:AB_221448 1:500


Abstract:

We hypothesized that brain regions showing neuronal activation after refeeding comprise major nodes in a satiety network, and tested this hypothesis with two sets of experiments. Detailed c-Fos mapping comparing fasted and refed rats was performed to identify candidate nodes of the satiety network. In addition to well-known feeding-related brain regions such as the arcuate, dorsomedial, and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, lateral hypothalamic area, parabrachial nucleus (PB), nucleus of the solitary tract and central amygdalar nucleus, other refeeding activated regions were also identified, such as the parastrial and parasubthalamic nuclei. To begin to understand the connectivity of the satiety network, the interconnectivity of PB with other refeeding-activated neuronal groups was studied following administration of anterograde or retrograde tracers into the PB. After allowing for tracer transport time, the animals were fasted and then refed before sacrifice. Refeeding-activated neurons that project to the PB were found in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamic area; arcuate, paraventricular, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; parasubthalamic nucleus; central amygdalar nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of the solitary tract. Axons originating from the PB were observed to closely associate with refeeding-activated neurons in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamus; paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; central amygdalar nucleus; parasubthalamic nucleus; ventral posterior thalamic nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of the solitary tract. These data indicate that the PB has bidirectional connections with most refeeding-activated neuronal groups, suggesting that short-loop feedback circuits exist in this satiety network. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2803-2827, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Thyroid Hormone Acts Locally to Increase Neurogenesis, Neuronal Differentiation, and Dendritic Arbor Elaboration in the Tadpole Visual System.

  • Thompson CK
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2016 Oct 5

Literature context: in mouse, RRID:AB_221448; GFP, 1:20


Abstract:

Thyroid hormone (TH) regulates many cellular events underlying perinatal brain development in vertebrates. Whether and how TH regulates brain development when neural circuits are first forming is less clear. Furthermore, although the molecular mechanisms that impose spatiotemporal constraints on TH action in the brain have been described, the effects of local TH signaling are poorly understood. We determined the effects of manipulating TH signaling on development of the optic tectum in stage 46-49 Xenopus laevis tadpoles. Global TH treatment caused large-scale morphological effects in tadpoles, including changes in brain morphology and increased tectal cell proliferation. Either increasing or decreasing endogenous TH signaling in tectum, by combining targeted DIO3 knockdown and methimazole, led to corresponding changes in tectal cell proliferation. Local increases in TH, accomplished by injecting suspensions of tri-iodothyronine (T3) in coconut oil into the midbrain ventricle or into the eye, selectively increased tectal or retinal cell proliferation, respectively. In vivo time-lapse imaging demonstrated that local TH first increased tectal progenitor cell proliferation, expanding the progenitor pool, and subsequently increased neuronal differentiation. Local T3 also dramatically increased dendritic arbor growth in neurons that had already reached a growth plateau. The time-lapse data indicate that the same cells are differentially sensitive to T3 at different time points. Finally, TH increased expression of genes pertaining to proliferation and neuronal differentiation. These experiments indicate that endogenous TH locally regulates neurogenesis at developmental stages relevant to circuit assembly by affecting cell proliferation and differentiation and by acting on neurons to increase dendritic arbor elaboration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: Thyroid hormone (TH) is a critical regulator of perinatal brain development in vertebrates. Abnormal TH signaling in early pregnancy is associated with significant cognitive deficits in humans; however, it is difficult to probe the function of TH in early brain development in mammals because of the inaccessibility of the fetal brain in the uterine environment and the challenge of disambiguating maternal versus fetal contributions of TH. The external development of tadpoles allows manipulation and direct observation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying TH's effects on brain development in ways not possible in mammals. We find that endogenous TH locally regulates neurogenesis at developmental stages relevant to circuit assembly by affecting neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation and by acting on neurons to enhance dendritic arbor elaboration.

Neuronal labeling patterns in the spinal cord of adult transgenic Zebrafish.

  • Stil A
  • Dev Neurobiol
  • 2016 Jun 18

Literature context: e 16A11), RRID:AB_221448 DSHB, mous


Abstract:

We describe neuronal patterns in the spinal cord of adult zebrafish. We studied the distribution of cells and processes in the three spinal regions reported in the literature: the 8th vertebra used as a transection injury site, the 15th vertebra mainly used for motor cell recordings and also for crush injury, and the 24th vertebra used to record motor nerve activity. We used well-known transgenic lines in which expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is driven by promoters to hb9 and isl1 in motoneurons, alx/chx10 and evx1 interneurons, ngn1 in sensory neurons and olig2 in oligodendrocytes, as well as antibodies for neurons (HuC/D, NF and SV2) and glia (GFAP). In isl1:GFP fish, GFP-positive processes are retained in the upper part of ventral horns and two subsets of cell bodies are observed. The pattern of the transgene in hb9:GFP adults is more diffuse and fibers are present broadly through the adult spinal cord. In alx/chx10 and evx1 lines we respectively observed two and three different GFP-positive populations. Finally, the ngn1:GFP transgene identifies dorsal root ganglion and some cells in dorsal horns. Interestingly some GFP positive fibers in ngn1:GFP fish are located around Mauthner axons and their density seems to be related to a rostrocaudal gradient. Many other cell types have been described in embryos and need to be studied in adults. Our findings provide a reference for further studies on spinal cytoarchitecture. Combined with physiological, histological and pathological/traumatic approaches, these studies will help clarify the operation of spinal locomotor circuits of adult zebrafish.

Mapping of brain lipid binding protein (Blbp) in the brain of adult zebrafish, co-expression with aromatase B and links with proliferation.

  • Diotel N
  • Gene Expr. Patterns
  • 2016 Jan 29

Literature context: : A21271; RRID:AB_221448). The spec


Abstract:

Adult fish exhibit a strong neurogenic capacity due to the persistence of radial glial cells. In zebrafish, radial glial cells display well-established markers such as the estrogen-synthesizing enzyme (AroB) and the brain lipid binding protein (Blbp), which is known to strongly bind omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). While Blpb is mainly described in the telencephalon of adult zebrafish, its expression in the remaining regions of the brain is poorly documented. The present study was designed to further investigate Blbp expression in the brain, its co-expression with AroB, and its link with radial glial cells proliferation in zebrafish. We generated a complete and detailed mapping of Blbp expression in the whole brain and show its complete co-expression with AroB, except in some tectal and hypothalamic regions. By performing PCNA and Blbp immunohistochemistry on cyp19a1b-GFP (AroB-GFP) fish, we also demonstrated preferential Blbp expression in proliferative radial glial cells in almost all regions studied. To our knowledge, this is the first complete and detailed mapping of Blbp-expressing cells showing strong association between Blbp and radial glial cell proliferation in the adult brain of fish. Given that zebrafish is now recognized models for studying neurogenesis and brain repair, our data provide detailed characterization of Blbp in the entire brain and open up a broad field of research investigating the role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in neural stem cell activity in fish.

Differential expression of id genes and their potential regulator znf238 in zebrafish adult neural progenitor cells and neurons suggests distinct functions in adult neurogenesis.

  • Diotel N
  • Gene Expr. Patterns
  • 2015 Nov 26

Literature context: ne 16A11, RRID:AB_221448). The seco


Abstract:

Teleost fish display a remarkable ability to generate new neurons and to repair brain lesions during adulthood. They are, therefore, a very popular model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of constitutive and induced neurogenesis in adult vertebrates. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns of inhibitor of DNA binding (id) genes and of their potential transcriptional repressor, znf238, in the whole brain of adult zebrafish. We show that while id1 is exclusively expressed in ventricular cells in the whole brain, id2a, id3 and id4 genes are expressed in broader areas. Interestingly, znf238 was also detected in these regions, its expression overlapping with id2a, id3 and id4 expression. Further detailed characterization of the id-expressing cells demonstrated that (a) id1 is expressed in type 1 and type 2 neural progenitors as previously published, (b) id2a in type 1, 2 and 3 neural progenitors, (c) id3 in type 3 neural progenitors and (d) id4 in postmitotic neurons. Our data provide a detailed map of id and znf238 expression in the brain of adult zebrafish, supplying a framework for studies of id genes function during adult neurogenesis and brain regeneration in the zebrafish.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R37 DK050107(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R03 NS071442(United States)

Vesicular stomatitis virus enables gene transfer and transsynaptic tracing in a wide range of organisms.

  • Mundell NA
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2015 Aug 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Current limitations in technology have prevented an extensive analysis of the connections among neurons, particularly within nonmammalian organisms. We developed a transsynaptic viral tracer originally for use in mice, and then tested its utility in a broader range of organisms. By engineering the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to encode a fluorophore and either the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) or its own glycoprotein (VSV-G), we created viruses that can transsynaptically label neuronal circuits in either the retrograde or anterograde direction, respectively. The vectors were investigated for their utility as polysynaptic tracers of chicken and zebrafish visual pathways. They showed patterns of connectivity consistent with previously characterized visual system connections, and revealed several potentially novel connections. Further, these vectors were shown to infect neurons in several other vertebrates, including Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, axolotls, and Xenopus. They were also shown to infect two invertebrates, Drosophila melanogaster, and the box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora, a species previously intractable for gene transfer, although no clear evidence of transsynaptic spread was observed in these species. These vectors provide a starting point for transsynaptic tracing in most vertebrates, and are also excellent candidates for gene transfer in organisms that have been refractory to other methods.

Intrinsic and extrinsic innervation of the heart in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

  • Stoyek MR
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2015 Aug 1

Literature context: C/D (Hu) RRID:AB_221448 Human neur


Abstract:

In the vertebrate heart the intracardiac nervous system is the final common pathway for autonomic control of cardiac output, but the neuroanatomy of this system is not well understood. In this study we investigated the innervation of the heart in a model vertebrate, the zebrafish. We used antibodies against acetylated tubulin, human neuronal protein C/D, choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide to visualize neural elements and their neurotransmitter content. Most neurons were located at the venous pole in a plexus around the sinoatrial valve; mean total number of cells was 197 ± 23, and 92% were choline acetyltransferase positive, implying a cholinergic role. The plexus contained cholinergic, adrenergic, and nitrergic axons and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-positive terminals, some innervating somata. Putative pacemaker cells near the plexus showed immunoreactivity for hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) and the transcription factor Islet-1 (Isl1). The neurotracer neurobiotin showed that extrinsic axons from the left and right vagosympathetic trunks innervated the sinoatrial plexus proximal to their entry into the heart; some extrinsic axons from each trunk also projected into the medial dorsal plexus region. Extrinsic axons also innervated the atrial and ventricular walls. An extracardiac nerve trunk innervated the bulbus arteriosus and entered the arterial pole of the heart to innervate the proximal ventricle. We have shown that the intracardiac nervous system in the zebrafish is anatomically and neurochemically complex, providing a substrate for autonomic control of cardiac effectors in all chambers.

Regional innervation of the heart in the goldfish, Carassius auratus: a confocal microscopy study.

  • Newton CM
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2014 Feb 1

Literature context: RRID:AB_221448


Abstract:

The intracardiac nervous system represents the final common pathway for autonomic control of the vertebrate heart in maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis. In teleost fishes, details of the organization of this system are not well understood. Here we investigated innervation patterns in the heart of the goldfish, a species representative of a large group of cyprinids. We used antibodies against the neuronal markers zn-12, acetylated tubulin, and human neuronal protein C/D, as well as choline acetyltransferase, tyrosine hydroxylase, nitric oxide synthetase, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) to detect neural elements and their transmitter contents in wholemounts and sections of cardiac tissue. All chambers of the heart were innervated by choline acetyltransferase-positive axons, implying cholinergic regulation; and by tyrosine hydroxylase-containing axons, implying adrenergic regulation. The mean total number of intracardiac neurons was 713 ± 78 (SE), nearly half of which were cholinergic. Neuronal somata were mainly located in a ganglionated plexus around the sinoatrial valves. Somata were contacted by cholinergic, adrenergic, nitrergic, and VIP-positive terminals. Putative pacemaker cells, identified by immunoreactivity for hyperpolarization activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4, were located in the base of the sinoatrial valves, and this region was densely innervated by cholinergic and adrenergic terminals. We have shown that the goldfish heart possesses the necessary neuroanatomical substrate for fine, region-by-region autonomic control of the myocardial effectors that are involved in determining cardiac output.

LGR4 and its ligands, R-spondin 1 and R-spondin 3, regulate food intake in the hypothalamus of male rats.

  • Li JY
  • Endocrinology
  • 2014 Feb 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

The hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of feeding behavior. Several hypothalamic nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus (ARC), paraventricular nucleus, and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH), are involved in energy homeostasis. Analysis of microarray data derived from ARC revealed that leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4) is highly expressed. LGR4, LGR5, and LGR6 form a subfamily of closely related receptors. Recently, R-spondin (Rspo) family proteins were identified as ligands of the LGR4 subfamily. In the present study, we investigated the distribution and function of LGR4-LGR6 and Rspos (1-4) in the brain of male rat. In situ hybridization showed that LGR4 is expressed in the ARC, VMH, and median eminence of the hypothalamus. LGR4 colocalizes with neuropeptide Y, proopiomelanocortin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor neurons. LGR5 is not detectable with in situ hybridization; LGR6 is only expressed in the epithelial lining of the lower portion of the third ventricle and median eminence. Rspo1 is expressed in the VMH and down-regulated with fasting. Rspo3 is expressed in the paraventricular nucleus and also down-regulated with fasting. Rspos 1 and 3 colocalize with the neuronal marker HuD, indicating that they are expressed by neurons. Injection of Rspo1 or Rspo3 into the third brain ventricle inhibited food intake. Rspo1 decreased neuropeptide Y and increased proopiomelanocortin expression in the ARC. Rspo1 and Rspo3 mRNA is up-regulated by insulin. These data indicate that Rspo1 and Rspo3 and their receptor LGR4 form novel circuits in the brain to regulate energy homeostasis.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY022358(United States)

Tanycyte-like cells form a blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in the circumventricular organs of the mouse brain.

  • Langlet F
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2013 Oct 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Tanycytes are highly specialized ependymal cells that form a blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier at the level of the median eminence (ME), a circumventricular organ (CVO) located in the tuberal region of the hypothalamus. This ependymal layer harbors well-organized tight junctions, a hallmark of central nervous system barriers that is lacking in the fenestrated portal vessels of the ME. The displacement of barrier properties from the vascular to the ventricular side allows the diffusion of blood-borne molecules into the parenchyma of the ME while tanycyte tight junctions control their diffusion into the CSF, thus maintaining brain homeostasis. In the present work, we combined immunohistochemical and permeability studies to investigate the presence of tanycyte barriers along the ventricular walls of other brain CVOs. Our data indicate that, unlike cuboidal ependymal cells, ependymal cells bordering the CVOs possess long processes that project into the parenchyma of the CVOs to reach the fenestrated capillary network. Remarkably, these tanycyte-like cells display well-organized tight junctions around their cell bodies. Consistent with these observations, permeability studies show that this ependymal layer acts as a diffusion barrier. Together, our results suggest that tanycytes are a characteristic feature of all CVOs and yield potential new insights into their involvement in regulating the exchange between the blood, the brain, and the CSF within these "brain windows."

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS039600(United States)

Increased radial glia quiescence, decreased reactivation upon injury and unaltered neuroblast behavior underlie decreased neurogenesis in the aging zebrafish telencephalon.

  • Edelmann K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2013 Sep 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The zebrafish has recently become a source of new data on the mechanisms of neural stem cell (NSC) maintenance and ongoing neurogenesis in adult brains. In this vertebrate, neurogenesis occurs at high levels in all ventricular regions of the brain, and brain injuries recover successfully, owing to the recruitment of radial glia, which function as NSCs. This new vertebrate model of adult neurogenesis is thus advancing our knowledge of the molecular cues in use for the activation of NSCs and fate of their progeny. Because the regenerative potential of somatic stem cells generally weakens with increasing age, it is important to assess the extent to which zebrafish NSC potential decreases or remains unaltered with age. We found that neurogenesis in the ventricular zone, in the olfactory bulb, and in a newly identified parenchymal zone of the telencephalon indeed declines as the fish ages and that oligodendrogenesis also declines. In the ventricular zone, the radial glial cell population remains largely unaltered morphologically but enters less frequently into the cell cycle and hence produces fewer neuroblasts. The neuroblasts themselves do not change their behavior with age and produce the same number of postmitotic neurons. Thus, decreased neurogenesis in the physiologically aging zebrafish brain is correlated with an increasing quiescence of radial glia. After injuries, radial glia in aged brains are reactivated, and the percentage of cell cycle entry is increased in the radial glia population. However, this reaction is far less pronounced than in younger animals, pointing to irreversible changes in aging zebrafish radial glia.

Funding information:
  • NICHD NIH HHS - 5P30HD024064(United States)

Molecular characterization of the subnuclei in rat habenula.

  • Aizawa H
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Dec 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The mammalian habenula is involved in regulating the activities of serotonergic and dopaminergic neurons. It consists of the medial and lateral habenulae, with each subregion having distinct neural connectivity. Despite the functional significance, manipulating neural activity in a subset of habenular pathways remains difficult because of the poor availability of molecular markers that delineate the subnuclear structures. Thus, we examined the molecular nature of neurons in the habenular subnuclei by analyzing the gene expressions of neurotransmitter markers. The results showed that different subregions of the medial habenula (MHb) use different combinations of neurotransmitter systems and could be categorized as either exclusively glutamatergic (superior part of MHb), both substance P-ergic and glutamatergic (dorsal region of central part of MHb), or both cholinergic and glutamatergic (inferior part, ventral region of central part, and lateral part of MHb). The superior part of the MHb strongly expressed interleukin-18 and was innervated by noradrenergic fibers. In contrast, the inferior part, ventral region of the central part, and lateral part of the MHb were peculiar in that acetylcholine and glutamate were cotransmitted from the axonal terminals. In contrast, neurons in the lateral habenula (LHb) were almost uniformly glutamatergic. Finally, the expressions of Htr2c and Drd2 seemed complementary in the medial LHb division, whereas they coincided in the lateral division, suggesting that the medial and lateral divisions of LHb show strong heterogeneity with respect to monoamine receptor expression. These analyses clarify molecular differences between subnuclei in the mammalian habenula that support their respective functional implications.

Funding information:
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - R03 DE024490(United States)

Birth of neural progenitors during the embryonic period of sexual differentiation in the Japanese quail brain.

  • Bardet SM
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Dec 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Several brain areas in the diencephalon are involved in the activation and expression of sexual behavior, including in quail the medial preoptic nucleus (POM). However, the ontogeny of these diencephalic brain nuclei has not to this date been examined in detail. We investigated the ontogeny of POM and other steroid-sensitive brain regions by injecting quail eggs with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) at various stages between embryonic day (E)3 and E16 and killing animals at postnatal (PN) days 3 or 56. In the POM, large numbers of BrdU-positive cells were observed in subjects injected from E3-E10, the numbers of these cells was intermediate in birds injected on E12, and most cells were postmitotic in both sexes on E14-E16. Injections on E3-E4 labeled large numbers of Hu-positive cells in POM. In contrast, injections performed at a later stage labeled cells that do not express aromatase nor neuronal markers such as Hu or NeuN in the POM and other steroid-sensitive nuclei and thus do not have a neuronal phenotype in these locations, contrary to what is observed in the telencephalon and cerebellum. No evidence could also be collected to demonstrate that these cells have a glial nature. Converging data, including the facts that these cells divide in the brain mantle and express proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cell cycling marker, indicate that cells labeled by BrdU during the second half of embryonic life are slow-cycling progenitors born and residing in the brain mantle. Future research should now identify their functional significance.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - (United States)

Galanin gene expression and effects of its knock-down on the development of the nervous system in larval zebrafish.

  • Podlasz P
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Dec 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Despite the known importance of galanin in the nervous system of vertebrates, the galanin gene structure and expression and the consequences of galanin deficiency in developing zebrafish are unknown. We cloned the galanin gene and analyzed its expression by using in situ hybridization, PCR, and immunocytochemistry throughout the early development of zebrafish until the end of the first week of life. The single zebrafish galanin gene encoded for a single amidated galanin peptide and a galanin message-associated peptide. Two forms resulting from alternative processing were identified. Galanin mRNA was maternally expressed and found in developing fish throughout early development. In situ hybridization showed the first positive neurons in three groups in the brain at 28 hours postfertilization. At 2 days postfertilization, three prosencephalic neuron groups were seen in the preoptic area and in rostral and caudal periventricular hypothalamus. In addition, two other groups of weakly stained neurons were visible, one in the midbrain and another in the hindbrain. Translation inhibition of galanin mRNA with morpholino oligonucleotides caused complete disappearance of galanin immunoreactivity in the brain until 7 dpf and did not induce known cascades of nonspecific pathways or morphological abnormalities. A minor disturbance of sensory ganglia was found. Galanin knockdown did not alter the expression of tyrosine hydroxylases 1 and 2, choline acetyltransferase, histidine decarboxylase, or orexin mRNA. The results suggest that galanin does not regulate the development of these key markers of specific neurons, although galanin-expressing fibers were in a close spatial proximity to several neurons of these neuronal populations.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS087988(United States)

The cellular composition of neurogenic periventricular zones in the adult zebrafish forebrain.

  • Lindsey BW
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Jul 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

A central goal of adult neurogenesis research is to characterize the cellular constituents of a neurogenic niche and to understand how these cells regulate the production of new neurons. Because the generation of adult-born neurons may be tightly coupled to their functional requirement, the organization and output of neurogenic niches may vary across different regions of the brain or between species. We have undertaken a comparative study of six (D, Vd, Vv, Dm, Dl, Ppa) periventricular zones (PVZs) harboring proliferative cells present in the adult forebrain of the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a species known to possess widespread neurogenesis throughout life. Using electron microscopy, we have documented for the first time the detailed cytoarchitecture of these zones, and propose a model of the cellular composition of pallial and subpallial PVZs, as well as a classification scheme for identifying morphologically distinct cell types. Immunolabeling of resin-embedded tissue confirmed the phenotype of three constitutively proliferating (bromodeoxyuridine [BrdU]+) cell populations, including a radial glial-like (type IIa) cell immunopositive for both S100β and glutamine synthetase (GS). Our data revealed rostrocaudal differences in the density of distinct proliferative populations, and cumulative labeling studies suggested that the cell cycle kinetics of these populations are not uniform between PVZs. Although the peak numbers of differentiated neurons were generated after ~2 weeks among most PVZs, niche-specific decline in the number of newborn neurons in some regions occurred after 4 weeks. Our data suggest that the cytoarchitecture of neurogenic niches and the tempo of neuronal production are regionally distinct in the adult zebrafish forebrain.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - T32 MH096678(United States)

Neuronal and glial differentiation during lizard (Gallotia galloti) visual system ontogeny.

  • Romero-Alemán MM
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2012 Jul 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

We studied the histogenesis of the lizard visual system (E30 to adulthood) by using a selection of immunohistochemical markers that had proved relevant for other vertebrates. By E30, the Pax6(+) pseudostratified retinal epithelium shows few newborn retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the centrodorsal region expressing neuron- and synaptic-specific markers such as betaIII-tubulin (Tuj1), synaptic vesicle protein-2 (SV2), and vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1). Concurrently, pioneer RGC axons run among the Pax2(+) astroglia in the optic nerve and reach the superficial optic tectum. Between E30 and E35, the optic chiasm and optic tract remain acellular, but the latter contains radial processes with subpial endfeet expressing vimentin (Vim). From E35, neuron- and synaptic-specific stainings spread in the retina and optic tectum, whereas retinal Pax6, and Tuj1/SV2 in RGC axons decrease. Müller glia and abundant optic nerve glia express a variety of glia-specific markers until adulthood. Subpopulations of optic nerve glia are also VGLUT1(+) and cluster differentiation-44 (CD44)-positive but cytokeratin-negative, unlike the case in other regeneration-competent species. Specifically, coexpression of CD44/Vim and glutamine synthetase (GS)/VGLUT1 reflects glial specialization, insofar as most CD44(+) glia are GS(-). In the adult optic tract and tectum, radial glia and free astroglia coexist. The latter show different immunocharacterization (Pax2(-)/CD44(-) /Vim(-)) compared with that in the optic nerve. We conclude that upregulation of Tuj1 and SV2 is required for axonal outgrowth and search for appropriate targets, whereas Pax2(+) optic nerve astroglia and Vim(+) radial glia may aid in early axonal guidance. Spontaneous axonal regrowth seems to succeed despite the heterogeneous mammalian-like glial environment in the lizard optic nerve.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01-GM084947(United States)
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R15 MH099590(United States)

Neurochemical phenotypes of myenteric neurons in the rhesus monkey.

  • Noorian AR
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2011 Dec 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Understanding the neurochemical composition of the enteric nervous system (ENS) is critical for elucidating neurological function in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in health and disease. Despite their status as the closest models of human neurological systems, relatively little is known about enteric neurochemistry in nonhuman primates. We describe neurochemical coding of the enteric nervous system, specifically the myenteric plexus, of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) by immunohistochemistry and directly compare it to human tissues. There are considerable differences in the myenteric plexus along different segments of the monkey GI tract. While acetylcholine neurons make up the majority of myenteric neurons in the stomach (70%), they are a minority in the rectum (47%). Conversely, only 22% of gastric myenteric neurons express nitric oxide synthase (NOS) compared to 52% in the rectum. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is more prominent in the stomach (37%) versus the rest of the GI tract (≈10%), and catecholamine neurons are rare (≈1%). There is significant coexpression of NOS and VIP in myenteric neurons that is more prominent in the proximal GI tract. Taken as a whole, these data provide insight into the neurochemical anatomy underlying GI motility. While overall similarity to other mammalian species is clear, there are some notable differences between the ENS of rhesus monkeys, humans, and other species that will be important to take into account when evaluating models of human diseases in animals.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - U01 HG02712(United States)

Neurochemical coding of enteric neurons in adult and embryonic zebrafish (Danio rerio).

  • Uyttebroek L
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Nov 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Although the morphology and development of the zebrafish enteric nervous system have been extensively studied, the precise neurochemical coding of enteric neurons and their proportional enteric distribution are currently not known. By using immunohistochemistry, we determined the proportional expression and coexpression of neurochemical markers in the embryonic and adult zebrafish intestine. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) were observed only in nerve fibers, whereas other markers were also detected in neuronal cell bodies. Calretinin and calbindin had similar distributions. In embryos, all markers, except for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and TH, were present from 72 hours postfertilization. Nitrergic neurons, evenly distributed and remaining constant in time, constituted the major neuronal subpopulation. The neuronal proportions of the other markers increased during development and were characterized by regional differences. In the adult, all markers examined were expressed in the enteric nervous system. A large percentage of enteric neurons displayed calbindin and calretinin, and serotonin was the only marker showing significant distribution differences in the three intestinal regions. Colocalization studies showed that serotonin was not coexpressed with any of the other markers. At least five neuronal subpopulations were determined: a serotonergic, a nitrergic noncholinergic, two cholinergic nonnitrergic subpopulations along with one subpopulation expressing both ChAT and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Analysis of nerve fibers revealed that nitrergic neurons coexpress VIP and PACAP, and that nitrergic neurons innervate the tunica muscularis, whereas serotonergic and cholinergic nonnitrergic neurons innervate the lamina propria and the tunica muscularis.

Funding information:
  • NIBIB NIH HHS - P41-EB001978(United States)

Expression of neuronal markers, synaptic proteins, and glutamine synthetase in the control and regenerating lizard visual system.

  • Romero-Alemán MM
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Spontaneous regrowth of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons occurs after optic nerve (ON) transection in the lizard Gallotia galloti. To gain more insight into this event we performed an immunohistochemical study on selected neuron and glial markers, which proved useful for analyzing the axonal regrowth process in different regeneration models. In the control lizards, RGCs were beta-III tubulin- (Tuj1) and HuCD-positive. The vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1) preferentially stained RGCs and glial somata rather than synaptic layers. In contrast, SV2 and vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT) labeling was restricted to both plexiform layers. Strikingly, the strong expression of glutamine synthetase (GS) in both Müller glia processes and macroglial somata revealed a high glutamate metabolism along the visual system. Upregulation of Tuj1 and HuCD in the surviving RGCs was observed at all the timepoints studied (1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postlesion). The significant rise of Tuj1 in the optic nerve head and optic tract (OTr) by 1 and 6 months postlesion, respectively, suggests an increase of the beta-III tubulin transport and incorporation into newly formed axons. Persistent Tuj1(+) and SV2(+) puncta and swellings were abnormally observed in putative degenerating/dystrophic fibers. Unexpectedly, neuron-like cells of obscure significance were identified in the control and regenerating ON-OTr. We conclude that: 1) the persistent upregulation of Tuj1 and HuCD favors the long-lasting axonal regrowth process; 2) the latter succeeded despite the ectopia and dystrophy of some regrowing fibers; and 3) maintenance of the glutamate-glutamine cycle contributes to the homeostasis and plasticity of the system.

Funding information:
  • NIBIB NIH HHS - R01 EB000219-11(United States)

Identification of cerebellin2 in chick and its preferential expression by subsets of developing sensory neurons and their targets in the dorsal horn.

  • Yang M
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Jul 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The cerebellins are a family of four secreted proteins, two of which, Cbln1 and Cbln3, play an important role in the formation and maintenance of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses. We have identified the chicken homologue of Cbln2 and, through the use of in situ hybridization, shown that it is expressed by specific subsets of neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord starting shortly after those neurons are generated. In the developing spinal cord, Cbln2 is highly expressed by dI1, dI3, dI5, and dILB dorsal interneurons and to a lesser extent by dI2, dI4, dI6, and dILA dorsal interneurons, but not by ventral (v0-v3) interneurons. After the spinal cord has matured and neurons have migrated to their final destinations, Cbln2 is abundant in the dorsal horn. In the DRGs, Cbln2 is expressed by TrkB+ and TrkC+ sensory neurons, but not by TrkA+ sensory neurons. Interestingly, regions of the spinal cord where TrkB+ and TrkC+ afferents terminate (i.e., laminae II, III, IV, and VI) exhibit the highest levels of Cbln2 expression. Cbln2 is also expressed by preganglionic sympathetic neurons and their targets in the sympathetic chain ganglia. Thus, the results show that Cbln2 is frequently expressed by synaptically connected neuronal populations. This, in turn, raises the possibility that if Cbln2, like Cbln1, plays a role in the formation and maintenance of synapses, it may somehow mediate bi-directional communication between discrete populations of neurons and their appropriate neuronal targets.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - R01AG036039(United Kingdom)

Regional distribution and cellular localization of beta2-adrenoceptors in the adult zebrafish brain (Danio rerio).

  • Ampatzis K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 May 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the physiological responses to adrenaline and noradrenaline. The present study aimed to determine the regional distribution of beta(2)-ARs in the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain by means of in vitro autoradiographic and immunohistochemical methods. The immunohistochemical localization of beta(2)-ARs, in agreement with the quantitative beta-adrenoceptor autoradiography, showed a wide distribution of beta(2)-ARs in the adult zebrafish brain. The cerebellum and the dorsal zone of periventricular hypothalamus exhibited the highest density of [(3)H]CGP-12177 binding sites and beta(2)-AR immunoreactivity. Neuronal cells strongly stained for beta(2)-ARs were found in the periventricular ventral telencephalic area, magnocellular and parvocellular superficial pretectal nuclei (PSm, PSp), occulomotor nucleus (NIII), locus coeruleus (LC), medial octavolateral nucleus (MON), magnocellular octaval nucleus (MaON) reticular formation (SRF, IMRF, IRF), and ganglionic cell layer of cerebellum. Interestingly, in most cases (NIII, LC, MON, MaON, SRF, IMRF, ganglionic cerebellar layer) beta(2)-ARs were colocalized with alpha(2A)-ARs in the same neuron, suggesting their interaction for mediating the physiological functions of nor/adrenaline. Moderate to low labeling of beta(2)-ARs was found in neurons in dorsal telencephalic area, optic tectum (TeO), torus semicircularis (TS), and periventricular gray zone of optic tectum (PGZ). In addition to neuronal, glial expression of beta(2)-ARs was found in astrocytic fibers located in the central gray and dorsal rhombencephalic midline, in close relation to the ventricle. The autoradiographic and immunohistochemical distribution pattern of beta(2)-ARs in the adult zebrafish brain further support the conserved profile of adrenergic/noradrenergic system through vertebrate brain evolution.

Area-specific migration and recruitment of new neurons in the adult songbird brain.

  • Vellema M
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 May 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Neuron recruitment has been implicated in morphological and functional plasticity in the adult brain. Whereas mammals restrict neuron recruitment specifically to two regions of known plasticity, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb, newborn neurons are found throughout the forebrain of adult songbirds. In order to study the area-specificity of the widespread proliferation and recruitment in the songbird brain, six adult male canaries received repetitive intraperitoneal injections of the mitotic marker BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) and were sacrificed after 24 hours to study proliferation or after 38 days to study recruitment. Migration and incorporation of new neurons was apparent throughout many but not all parts of the canary forebrain and was quantitatively related to mitotic levels in the most closely associated proliferative zones. Surprisingly, some areas of the vocal control system sensitive to plastic changes, such as nucleus higher vocal center (HVC) and area X, recruited similar numbers of new neurons as their surrounding brain tissues, employing no specific directional mechanisms. The distribution pattern in and around HVC could best be described by a random displacement model, where cells originating from the overlying lateral ventricle can move independently in any direction. Other plastic song control areas, such as the medial magnocellular nucleus of anterior nidopallium and the robust nucleus of arcopallium, were specifically avoided by migrating neurons, while migration toward the olfactory bulb showed high specificity, similar to the mammalian rostral migratory stream. Thus, different mechanisms appear to organize area-specific neuron recruitment in different recipients of the adult songbird brain, unrelated to global plasticity of brain regions.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - BB/G02247X/1(United Kingdom)

Distribution of leptin-sensitive cells in the postnatal and adult mouse brain.

  • Caron E
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Feb 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Leptin plays a pivotal role in the regulation of energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine functions, and increasing evidence indicates that leptin acts on the brain to mediate many of these effects. Recent data have also suggested that leptin influences brain development during early postnatal life. Here we examined the distribution of cells that express mRNA encoding the long form of the leptin receptor (LepRb) in postnatal and adult mouse brains by using in situ hybridization. In both adults and neonates, LepRb mRNA was largely restricted to regions known to control energy balance. Labeled cells were found in the arcuate, ventromedial, and dorsomedial nuclei of the hypothalamus as well as in the lateral hypothalamic area. Heavily labeled cells were also found in the median preoptic and ventral premammillary nuclei, two hypothalamic nuclei that are known to control reproduction. Moreover, during postnatal and adult life, clearly labeled cells were found in extrahypothalamic autonomic control sites such as the nucleus of the tractus solitarius. Importantly, this receptor can induce intracellular signaling because peripheral injection of leptin caused STAT3 phosphorylation in most sites in which LepRb mRNA was expressed. LepRb mRNA was also transiently elevated in certain regions of the postnatal mouse brain, such as the cortex, hippocampus, and laterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus. Taken together, these observations are consistent with the proposed roles of leptin in feeding and neuroendocrine regulation. They also identify regions where LepRb mRNA is expressed during early postnatal life and suggest new roles for leptin in the nervous system during development.

Excitotoxic motoneuron degeneration induced by glutamate receptor agonists and mitochondrial toxins in organotypic cultures of chick embryo spinal cord.

  • Brunet N
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2009 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction appear to play an important role in motoneuron (MN) degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In the present study we used an organotypic slice culture of chick embryo spinal cord to explore the responsiveness of mature MNs to different excitotoxic stimuli and mitrochondrial inhibition. We found that, in this system, MNs are highly vulnerable to excitotoxins such as glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and kainate (KA), and that the neuroprotective drug riluzole rescues MNs from KA-mediated excitotoxic death. MNs are also sensitive to chronic mitochondrial inhibition induced by malonate and 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) in a dose-dependent manner. MN degeneration induced by treatment with mitochondrial toxins displays structural changes similar to those seen following excitotoxicity and can be prevented by applying either the antiexcitotoxic drug 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione disodium (CNQX) or riluzole. Excitotoxicity results in an increased frequency of normal spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in MNs, which is followed by a sustained deregulation of intracellular Ca2+. Tolerance to excitotoxic MN death resulting from chronic exposure to excitotoxins correlates with a reduced excitotoxin-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ and increased thapsigargin-sensitive Ca2+ stores.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - EY-015549(United States)

Birth of ophthalmic trigeminal neurons initiates early in the placodal ectoderm.

  • McCabe KL
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2009 May 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

The largest of the cranial ganglia, the trigeminal ganglion, relays cutaneous sensations of the head to the central nervous system. Its sensory neurons have a dual origin from both ectodermal placodes and neural crest. Here, we show that the birth of neurons derived from the chick ophthalmic trigeminal placode begins prior to their ingression (HH11), as early as HH8, and considerably earlier than previously suspected (HH16). Furthermore, cells exiting the cell cycle shortly thereafter express the ophthalmic trigeminal placode marker Pax3 (HH9). At HH11, these postmitotic Pax3+ placode cells begin to express the pan-neuronal marker neurofilament while still in the ectoderm. Analysis of the ectodermal origin and distribution of these early postmitotic neurons reveals that the ophthalmic placode extends further rostrally than anticipated, contributing to neurons that reside in and make a significant contribution to the ophthalmic trigeminal nerve. These data redefine the timing and extent of neuron formation from the ophthalmic trigeminal placode.

Differential expression of canonical (classical) transient receptor potential channels in guinea pig enteric nervous system.

  • Liu S
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Dec 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

The canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) family of ion channels is implicated in many neuronal processes including calcium homeostasis, membrane excitability, synaptic transmission, and axon guidance. TRPC channels are postulated to be important in the functional neurobiology of the enteric nervous system (ENS); nevertheless, details for expression in the ENS are lacking. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to study the expression and localization of TRPC channels. We found mRNA transcripts, protein on Western blots, and immunoreactivity (IR) for TRPC1/3/4/6 expressed in the small intestinal ENS of adult guinea pigs. TRPC1/3/4/6-IR was localized to distinct subpopulations of enteric neurons and was differentially distributed between the myenteric and submucosal divisions of the ENS. TRPC1-IR was widely distributed and localized to neurons with cholinergic, calretinin, and nitrergic neuronal immunochemical codes in the myenteric plexus. It was localized to both cholinergic and noncholinergic secretomotor neurons in the submucosal plexus. TRPC3-IR was found only in the submucosal plexus and was expressed exclusively by neuropeptide Y-IR neurons. TRPC4/6-IR was expressed in only a small population of myenteric neurons, but was abundantly expressed in the submucosal plexus. TRPC4/6-IR was coexpressed with both cholinergic and nitrergic neurochemical codes in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, TRPC4/6-IR was expressed exclusively in noncholinergic secretomotor neurons. No TRPC1/3/4/6-IR was found in calbindin-IR neurons. TRPC3/4/6-IR was widely expressed along varicose nerve fibers and colocalized with synaptophysin-IR at putative neurotransmitter release sites. Our results suggest important roles for TRPC channels in ENS physiology and neuronal regulation of gut function.

Developmental and spatial expression pattern of alpha-taxilin in the rat central nervous system.

  • Sakakibara S
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Nov 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Alpha-taxilin has been identified as a binding partner of syntaxin family members and thus has been proposed to function in syntaxin-mediated intracellular vesicle trafficking. However, the lack of detailed information concerning the cellular and subcellular localization of alpha-taxilin impedes an understanding of the role of this protein. In the present study, we characterized alpha-taxilin-expressing cells in the rat CNS with a specific antibody. During embryonic development, alpha-taxilin was prominently expressed in nestin-positive neural stem cells in vivo and in vitro. As CNS development proceeded, the alpha-taxilin expression level was rapidly down-regulated. In the postnatal CNS, alpha-taxilin expression was almost confined to the neuronal lineage, with the highest levels of expression in motor neurons within the brainstem nuclei and spinal cord and in primary sensory neurons in mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. At the cellular level, alpha-taxilin was preferentially located in Nissl substance-like structures with a tigroid or globular morphology within the soma and proximal to dendrites, but it was excluded from terminals. Combined staining with propidium iodide demonstrated that alpha-taxilin distribution overlapped with the cytoplasmic compartment enriched in RNA species, suggesting a close association of alpha-taxilin with actively translating ribosomes or polysomes in neurons. In agreement with this, a recent study indicated the preferential binding of alpha-taxilin to the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (alphaNAC), a dynamic component of the ribosomal exit tunnel in eukaryotic cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that alpha-taxilin plays multiple roles in the generation and maintenance of neurons through modulation of the NAC-mediated translational machinary and/or the syntaxin-mediated vesicle traffic in the soma.

Fgf signaling in the zebrafish adult brain: association of Fgf activity with ventricular zones but not cell proliferation.

  • Topp S
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The zebrafish adult brain contains numerous neural progenitors and is a good model to approach the general mechanisms of adult neural stem cell maintenance and neurogenesis. Here we use this model to test for a correlation between Fgf signaling and cell proliferation in adult progenitor zones. We report expression of Fgf signals (fgf3,4,8a,8b,17b), receptors (fgfr1-4), and targets (erm, pea3, dusp6, spry1,2,4, and P-ERK) and document that genes of the embryonic fgf8 synexpression group acquire strikingly divergent patterns in the adult brain. We further document the specific expression of fgf3, fgfr1-3, dusp6, and P-ERK in ventricular zones, which contain neural progenitors. In these locations, however, a comparison at the single-cell level of fgfr/P-ERK expression with bromo-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and the proliferation marker MCM5 indicates that Fgf signaling is not specifically associated with proliferating progenitors. Rather, it correlates with the ventricular radial glia state, some of which only are progenitors. Together these results stress the importance of Fgf signaling in the adult brain and establish the basis to study its function in zebrafish, in particular in relation to adult neurogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - EY 02686(United States)

Quantitative assessment of glial cells in the human and guinea pig enteric nervous system with an anti-Sox8/9/10 antibody.

  • Hoff S
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Aug 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Quantitative changes of enteric glia (EGC) have been implicated in gastrointestinal disorders. To facilitate future studies of EGC in human pathology, we aimed to characterize thoroughly glial markers in the human enteric nervous system (ENS) and to compare EGC in man and guinea pig. Whole-mount preparations of the enteric nerve plexuses from human and guinea pig ileum and colon were labeled with antibodies against S100b, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and p75NGFR and the transcription factors Sox8/9/10 and neuronally counterstained. Abundant immunoreactivity (IR) for S100b, GFAP, p75NGFR, and Sox8/9/10 was detected in EGC of all studied regions. Although the cytoplasmatic staining pattern of most markers did not permit glial quantification, the nuclear localization of Sox8/9/10-IR allowed to identify and count all EGC individually. In both man and guinea pig, myenteric ganglia were larger and contained more EGC and neurons than submucous ganglia. Furthermore, there were more EGC in the human than in the guinea pig myenteric plexus (MP), glial density was consistently higher in the human ENS, and the glia index (glia:neuron ratio) ranged from 1.3 to 1.9 and from 5.9 to 7.0 in the human submucous plexus (SMP) and MP, respectively, whereas, in guinea pig, the glia index was 0.8-1.0 in the SMP and 1.7 in the MP. The glia index was the most robust quantitative descriptor within one species. This is a comprehensive set of quantitative EGC measures in man and guinea pig that provides a basis for pathological assessment of glial proliferation and/or degeneration in the diseased gut.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - MH078993(United States)

Development of enteric and vagal innervation of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) gut.

  • Olsson C
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Jun 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

The autonomic nervous system develops following migration and differentiation of precursor cells originating in the neural crest. Using immunohistochemistry on intact zebrafish embryos and larvae we followed the development of the intrinsic enteric and extrinsic vagal innervation of the gut. At 3 days postfertilization (dpf), enteric nerve cell bodies and fibers were seen mainly in the middle and distal intestine, while the innervation of the proximal intestine was scarcer. The number of fibers and cell bodies gradually increased, although a large intraindividual variation was seen in the timing (but not the order) of development. At 11-13 dpf most of the proximal intestine received a similar degree of innervation as the rest of the gut. The main intestinal branches of the vagus were similarly often already well developed at 3 dpf, entering the gut at the transition between the proximal and middle intestine and projecting posteriorly along the length of the gut. Subsequently, fibers branching off the vagus innervated all regions of the gut. The presence of several putative enteric neurotransmitters was suggested by using markers for neurokinin A (NKA), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), nitric oxide, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The present results corroborate the belief that the enteric innervation is well developed before the onset of feeding (normally occurring around 5-6 dpf). Further, the more detailed picture of how development proceeds at stages previously not examined suggests a correlation between increasing innervation and more regular and elaborated motility patterns.

Funding information:
  • NIDA NIH HHS - DA16272(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - GM069593(United States)

Neuronal and glial localization of alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors in the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain.

  • Ampatzis K
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 May 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor (AR) subtype, a G protein-coupled receptor located both pre- and postsynaptically, mediates adrenaline/noradrenaline functions. The present study aimed to determine the alpha(2A)-AR distribution in the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain by means of immunocytochemistry. Detailed mapping showed labeling of alpha(2A)-ARs, in neuropil, neuronal somata and fibers, glial processes, and blood vessels. A high density of alpha(2A)-AR immunoreactivity was found in the ventral telencephalic area, preoptic, pretectal, hypothalamic areas, torus semicircularis, oculomotor nucleus (NIII), locus coreruleus (LC), medial raphe, medial octavolateralis nucleus (MON), magnocellular octaval nucleus (MaON), reticular formation (SRF, IMRF, IRF), rhombencephalic nerves and roots (DV, V, VII, VIII, X), and cerebellar Purkinje cell layer. Moderate levels of alpha(2A)-ARs were observed in the medial and central zone nuclei of dorsal telencephalic area, in the periventricular gray zone of optic tectum, in the dorsomedial part of optic tectum layers, and in the molecular and granular layers of all cerebellum subdivisions. Glial processes were found to express alpha(2A)-ARs in rhombencephalon, intermingled with neuronal fibers. Medium-sized neurons were labeled in telencephalic, diencephalic, and mesencephlic areas, whereas densely labeled large neurons were found in rhombencephalon, locus coeruleus, reticular formation, oculomotor area, medial octavolateralis and magnocellular octaval nuclei, and Purkinje cell somata. The functional role of alpha(2A)-ARs on neurons and glial processes is not known at present; however, their strong relation to the ventricular system, somatosensory nuclei, and nerves supports a possible regulatory role of alpha(2A)-ARs in autonomic functions, nerve output, and sensory integration in adult zebrafish brain.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - UM1 HL098166(United States)
  • NIAID NIH HHS - AI 055502(United States)

Fate mapping Nkx2.1-lineage cells in the mouse telencephalon.

  • Xu Q
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2008 Jan 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2.1 is expressed in the pallidal (subcortical) telencephalon, including the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and preoptic area. Studies have shown that Nkx2.1 is required for normal patterning of the MGE and for the specification of the parvalbumin (PV)- and somatostatin (SST)-expressing cortical interneurons. To define the contribution of Nkx2.1 lineages to neurons in the mature telencephalon, we have generated transgenic mice carrying the genomic integration of a modified bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in which the second exon of Nkx2.1 is replaced by the Cre recombinase. Analysis of these mice has found that they express the Cre recombinase and Cre reporters within Nkx2.1-expressing domains of the brain, thyroid, pituitary, and lung. Telencephalic expression of reporters begins at about embryonic day 10.5. Expression both of Cre and of recombination-based Cre reporters is weaker within the dorsalmost region of the MGE than in other Nkx2.1-expressing regions. In this paper, we present fate-mapping data on Nkx2.1-lineage neurons throughout the telencephalon, including the cerebral cortex, amygdala, olfactory bulb, striatum, globus pallidus, septum, and nucleus basalis.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS059600(United States)

Cytological organization of the central gelatinosa in the turtle spinal cord.

  • Trujillo-Cenóz O
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2007 May 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

This paper deals with the cytological organization of the central gelatinosa (CG) in the spinal cord of juvenile (2-12 months) turtles. We found two main cell classes in the CG: one with characteristics of immature neurons, the other identified as radial glia (RG). The cells surrounding the central canal formed radial conglomerates in such a way that the RG lamellae covered the immature neurons. We found three major subpopulations of RG that expressed S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or both proteins. Electron microscopic images showed gap junctions interconnecting RG. As with the mammalian neuroepithelial cells, most CG cells displayed intrinsic polarity expressed by structural and molecular differences between the most apical and basal cell compartments. The apical zone was characterized by the occurrence of a single cilium associated with a conspicuous centrosomal complex. We found a prominent expression of the PCM-1 centrosomal protein concentrated close to the central canal lumen. In the particular case of RG, the peripheral end feet contacted the subpial basement membrane. We also found "transitional cell forms" difficult to classify by the usual imaging approaches. Functional clues obtained by patch-clamp recordings of CG cells defined some of them as already committed to follow the neuronal lineage, whereas others had properties of less mature or migrating cells. The CG appeared as a richly innervated region receiving terminal branches from nerve plexuses expressing gamma-aminobutyric acid, serotonin, and glutamate. The results presented here support our previous studies indicating that the CG is an extended neurogenic niche along the spinal cord of turtles.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - 89904(Canada)

Survival and death of mature avian motoneurons in organotypic slice culture: trophic requirements for survival and different types of degeneration.

  • Brunet N
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2007 Apr 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

We have developed an organotypic culture technique that uses slices of chick embryo spinal cord, in which trophic requirements for long-term survival of mature motoneurons (MNs) were studied. Slices were obtained from E16 chick embryos and maintained for up to 28 days in vitro (DIV) in a basal medium. Under these conditions, most MNs died. To promote MN survival, 14 different trophic factors were assayed. Among these 14, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor were the most effective. GDNF was able to promote MN survival for at least 28 DIV. K(+) depolarization or caspase inhibition prevented MN death but also induced degenerative-like changes in rescued MNs. Agents that elevate cAMP levels promoted the survival of a proportion of MNs for at least 7 DIV. Examination of dying MNs revealed that, in addition to cells exhibiting a caspase-3-dependent apoptotic pattern, some MNs died by a caspase-3-independent mechanism and displayed autophagic vacuoles, an extremely convoluted nucleus, and a close association with microglia. This organotypic spinal cord slice culture may provide a convenient model for testing conditions that promote survival of mature-like MNs that are affected in late-onset MN disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Funding information:
  • Wellcome Trust - 098362/Z/12/Z(United Kingdom)

Dynamic expression of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor neuroD in the rod and cone photoreceptor lineages in the retina of the embryonic and larval zebrafish.

  • Ochocinska MJ
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2007 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

NeuroD is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor critical for determining neuronal cell fate and regulating withdrawal from the cell cycle. We showed previously that, in goldfish, neuroD is expressed in the rod photoreceptor lineage, and we inferred that neuroD is also expressed in a subset of amacrine cells and nascent cone photoreceptors. Here we extended that study by examining the temporal and spatial expression pattern of neuroD in the embryonic and larval zebrafish and by identifying the cell types that express this gene. NeuroD expression in the developing zebrafish retina is dynamic, spanning early retinogenesis and the maturation of cone photoreceptors. In early retinogenesis neuroD expression expands from a small patch in the ventronasal retina, through the remaining retinal neuroepithelium. As retinogenesis progresses, neuroD expression becomes restricted to amacrine cells, immature cones, and cells of rod and cone lineages. This expression achieves an adult pattern by 96 hours postfertilization (hpf), whereupon the temporal pattern of neuroD expression in central retina is spatially recapitulated at the germinative margin. The cellular pattern of expression suggests that neuroD regulates aspects of rod and cone genesis, but through separate cellular lineages. Furthermore, neuroD is coexpressed with the cone-rod-homeobox transcription factor (Crx) in putative cone progenitors and nascent cone photoreceptors, suggesting that, in the zebrafish retina, as in other vertebrate retinas, similar genetic cascades regulate photoreceptor genesis and maturation.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - F31 AG044061(United States)

Identification of aromatase-positive radial glial cells as progenitor cells in the ventricular layer of the forebrain in zebrafish.

  • Pellegrini E
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2007 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Compared with other vertebrates, the brain of adult teleost fish exhibits two unique features: it exhibits unusually high neurogenic activity and strongly expresses aromatase, a key enzyme that converts aromatizable androgens into estrogens. Until now, these two features, high neurogenic and aromatase activities, have never been related to each other. Recently, it was shown that aromatase is expressed in radial glial cells of the forebrain and not in neurons. Here, we further document that Aromatase B is never detected in cells expressing the markers of postmitotic neurons, Hu and acetylated tubulin. By using a combination of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) treatment and immunohistochemical techniques, we demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that aromatase-positive radial cells actively divide to generate newborn cells in many forebrain regions. Such newborn cells can further divide, as shown by BrdU-proliferating cell nuclear antigen double staining. We also demonstrate that, over time, newborn cells move away from the ventricles, most likely by migrating along the radial processes. Finally, by using antisera to Hu and acetylated tubulin, we further document that some of the newborn cells derived from radial glia differentiate into neurons. These data provide new evidence for the mechanism of neurogenesis in the brain of adult fish. In addition, given that estrogens are well-known neurotrophic and neuroprotective factors affecting proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and differentiation, the expression of aromatase in the neural stem cells of the adult strongly demonstrates that the fish brain is an outstanding model for studying the effects of estrogens on adult neurogenesis and brain repair.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - T32 EY013934(United States)
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR061569(United States)

Formation of the avian nucleus magnocellularis from the auditory anlage.

  • Hendricks SJ
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2006 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the avian auditory system, the neural network for computing the localization of sound in space begins with bilateral innervation of nucleus laminaris (NL) by nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. We used antibodies against the neural specific markers Hu C/D, neurofilament, and SV2 together with retrograde fluorescent dextran labeling from the contralateral hindbrain to identify NM neurons within the anlage and follow their development. NM neurons could be identified by retrograde labeling as early as embryonic day (E) 6. While the auditory anlage organized itself into NM and NL in a rostral-to-caudal fashion between E6 and E8, labeled NM neurons were visible throughout the extent of the anlage at E6. By observing the pattern of neuronal rearrangements together with the pattern of contralaterally projecting NM fibers, we could identify NL in the ventral anlage. Ipsilateral NM fibers contacted the developing NL at E8, well after NM collaterals had projected contralaterally. Furthermore, the formation of ipsilateral connections between NM and NL neurons appeared to coincide with the arrival of VIIIth nerve fibers in NM. By E10, immunoreactivity for SV2 was heavily concentrated in the dorsal and ventral neuropils of NL. Thus, extensive pathfinding and morphological rearrangement of central auditory nuclei occurs well before the arrival of cochlear afferents. Our results suggest that NM neurons may play a central role in formation of tonotopic connections in the auditory system.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - N01-AI-70042(United States)