X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

mTOR (7C10) Rabbit mAb antibody

RRID:AB_2105622

Acid Suspends the Circadian Clock in Hypoxia through Inhibition of mTOR.

  • Walton ZE
  • Cell
  • 2018 Jun 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

Recent reports indicate that hypoxia influences the circadian clock through the transcriptional activities of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) at clock genes. Unexpectedly, we uncover a profound disruption of the circadian clock and diurnal transcriptome when hypoxic cells are permitted to acidify to recapitulate the tumor microenvironment. Buffering against acidification or inhibiting lactic acid production fully rescues circadian oscillation. Acidification of several human and murine cell lines, as well as primary murine T cells, suppresses mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a key regulator of translation in response to metabolic status. We find that acid drives peripheral redistribution of normally perinuclear lysosomes away from perinuclear RHEB, thereby inhibiting the activity of lysosome-bound mTOR. Restoring mTORC1 signaling and the translation it governs rescues clock oscillation. Our findings thus reveal a model in which acid produced during the cellular metabolic response to hypoxia suppresses the circadian clock through diminished translation of clock constituents.

Funding information:
  • NCRR NIH HHS - L30 RR020478(United States)

An ERK-Dependent Feedback Mechanism Prevents Hematopoietic Stem Cell Exhaustion.

  • Baumgartner C
  • Cell Stem Cell
  • 2018 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain hematopoiesis throughout life. HSCs exit dormancy to restore hemostasis in response to stressful events, such as acute blood loss, and must return to a quiescent state to prevent their exhaustion and resulting bone marrow failure. HSC activation is driven in part through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTORC1 signaling pathway, but less is known about the cell-intrinsic pathways that control HSC dormancy. Here, we delineate an ERK-dependent, rate-limiting feedback mechanism that controls HSC fitness and their re-entry into quiescence. We show that the MEK/ERK and PI3K pathways are synchronously activated in HSCs during emergency hematopoiesis and that feedback phosphorylation of MEK1 by activated ERK counterbalances AKT/mTORC1 activation. Genetic or chemical ablation of this feedback loop tilts the balance between HSC dormancy and activation, increasing differentiated cell output and accelerating HSC exhaustion. These results suggest that MEK inhibitors developed for cancer therapy may find additional utility in controlling HSC activation.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - K08 AG024816-05(United States)

Exogenous H2 S exerts biphasic effects on porcine mammary epithelial cells proliferation through PI3K/Akt-mTOR signaling pathway.

  • Zhang J
  • J. Cell. Physiol.
  • 2018 May 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

This study aimed to investigate the effects of exogenous H2 S on the proliferation of porcine mammary gland epithelial cells (PMECs) and explore the underlying mechanisms. We found that exposure of PMECs to NaHS, at concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 µM, stimulated cell proliferation. However, high concentration of NaHS (600 µM) inhibited PMECs proliferation. Accordingly, 10 µM NaHS significantly increased the percentage of cells undergoing DNA replication, elevated the mRNA and/or protein expression of Cyclin A2, Cyclin D1/3, Cyclin E2 and PCNA, and decreased p21 mRNA expression. In contrast, 600 µM NaHS elicited the opposite effects to that of 10 µM NaHS. In addition, PI3 K/Akt and mTOR signaling pathways were activated or inhibited in response to 10 or 600 µM NaHS, respectively. Furthermore, the promotion of PMECs proliferation, the change of proliferative genes expression, and the activation of mTOR signaling pathway induced by 10 µM NaHS were effectively blocked by PI3 K inhibitor Wortmannin. Similarly, inhibition of mTOR with Rapamycin totally abolished the 10 µM NaHS-induced stimulation of PMECs proliferation and alteration of proliferative genes expression, with no influence on PI3 K/Akt signaling pathway. Moreover, constitutive activation of Akt pathway via transfection of Akt-CA completely eliminated the inhibition of PMECs proliferation and mTOR signaling pathway, and the change of proliferative genes expression induced by 600 µM NaHS. In conclusion, our findings provided evidence that exogenous H2 S supplied by NaHS exerted biphasic effects on PMECs proliferation, with stimulation at lower doses and suppression at high dose, through the intracellular PI3 K/Akt-mTOR signaling pathway.

Funding information:
  • European Research Council - 232933(International)

Helicobacter pylori Infection Modulates Host Cell Metabolism through VacA-Dependent Inhibition of mTORC1.

  • Kim IJ
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2018 May 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Helicobacter pylori (Hp) vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is a bacterial exotoxin that enters host cells and induces mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the extent to which VacA-dependent mitochondrial perturbations affect overall cellular metabolism is poorly understood. We report that VacA perturbations in mitochondria are linked to alterations in cellular amino acid homeostasis, which results in the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and subsequent autophagy. mTORC1, which regulates cellular metabolism during nutrient stress, is inhibited during Hp infection by a VacA-dependent mechanism. This VacA-dependent inhibition of mTORC1 signaling is linked to the dissociation of mTORC1 from the lysosomal surface and results in activation of cellular autophagy through the Unc 51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1) complex. VacA intoxication results in reduced cellular amino acids, and bolstering amino acid pools prevents VacA-mediated mTORC1 inhibition. Overall, these studies support a model that Hp modulate host cell metabolism through the action of VacA at mitochondria.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI045928()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R21 AI117497()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - U19 AI106772(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM089771()

Juvenile treatment with mGluR2/3 agonist prevents schizophrenia-like phenotypes in adult by acting through GSK3β.

  • Xing B
  • Neuropharmacology
  • 2018 May 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Prodromal memory deficits represent an important marker for the development of schizophrenia (SZ), in which glutamatergic hypofunction occurs in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 (LY37) attenuates excitatory N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced neurotoxicity, a central pathological characteristic of glutamatergic hypofunction. We therefore hypothesized that early treatment with LY37 would rescue cognitive deficits and confer benefits for SZ-like behaviors in adults. To test this, we assessed whether early intervention with LY37 would improve learning outcomes in the Morris Water Maze for rats prenatally exposed to methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM), a neurodevelopmental SZ model. We found that a medium dose of LY37 prevents learning deficits in MAM rats. These effects were mediated through postsynaptic mGluR2/3 via improving GluN2B-NMDAR function by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β). Furthermore, dendritic spine loss and learning and memory deficits observed in adult MAM rats were restored by juvenile LY37 treatment, which did not change prefrontal neuronal excitability and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in adult normal rats. Our results provide a mechanism for mGluR2/3 agonists against NMDAR hypofunction, which may prove to be beneficial in the prophylactic treatment of SZ.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R56AI1691785(United States)
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH085666()

The Factor Inhibiting HIF Asparaginyl Hydroxylase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism and Accelerates Metabolic Adaptation to Hypoxia.

  • Sim J
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Apr 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Animals require an immediate response to oxygen availability to allow rapid shifts between oxidative and glycolytic metabolism. These metabolic shifts are highly regulated by the HIF transcription factor. The factor inhibiting HIF (FIH) is an asparaginyl hydroxylase that controls HIF transcriptional activity in an oxygen-dependent manner. We show here that FIH loss increases oxidative metabolism, while also increasing glycolytic capacity, and that this gives rise to an increase in oxygen consumption. We further show that the loss of FIH acts to accelerate the cellular metabolic response to hypoxia. Skeletal muscle expresses 50-fold higher levels of FIH than other tissues: we analyzed skeletal muscle FIH mutants and found a decreased metabolic efficiency, correlated with an increased oxidative rate and an increased rate of hypoxic response. We find that FIH, through its regulation of oxidation, acts in concert with the PHD/vHL pathway to accelerate HIF-mediated metabolic responses to hypoxia.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - GM062791(United States)

Systematic Functional Annotation of Somatic Mutations in Cancer.

  • Ng PK
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2018 Mar 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

The functional impact of the vast majority of cancer somatic mutations remains unknown, representing a critical knowledge gap for implementing precision oncology. Here, we report the development of a moderate-throughput functional genomic platform consisting of efficient mutant generation, sensitive viability assays using two growth factor-dependent cell models, and functional proteomic profiling of signaling effects for select aberrations. We apply the platform to annotate >1,000 genomic aberrations, including gene amplifications, point mutations, indels, and gene fusions, potentially doubling the number of driver mutations characterized in clinically actionable genes. Further, the platform is sufficiently sensitive to identify weak drivers. Our data are accessible through a user-friendly, public data portal. Our study will facilitate biomarker discovery, prediction algorithm improvement, and drug development.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA016672()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - HL-090775(United States)

Insulin-Like Growth Factor II Targets the mTOR Pathway to Reverse Autism-Like Phenotypes in Mice.

  • Steinmetz AB
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jan 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in social interaction and repetitive behavior, and is also associated with cognitive deficits. There is no current treatment that can ameliorate most of the ASD symptomatology; thus, identifying novel therapies is urgently needed. We used male BTBR T+Itpr3tf /J (BTBR) mice, a model that reproduces most of the core behavioral phenotypes of ASD, to test the effects of systemic administration of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), a polypeptide that crosses the blood-brain barrier and acts as a cognitive enhancer. We show that systemic IGF-II treatments reverse the typical defects in social interaction, cognitive/executive functions, and repetitive behaviors reflective of ASD-like phenotypes. In BTBR mice, IGF-II, via IGF-II receptor, but not via IGF-I receptor, reverses the abnormal levels of the AMPK-mTOR-S6K pathway and of active translation at synapses. Thus, IGF-II may represent a novel potential therapy for ASD.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Currently, there is no effective treatment for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a developmental disability affecting a high number of children. Using a mouse model that expresses most of the key core as well as associated behavioral deficits of ASD, that are, social, cognitive, and repetitive behaviors, we report that a systemic administration of the polypeptide insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) reverses all these deficits. The effects of IGF-II occur via IGF-II receptors, and not IGF-I receptors, and target both basal and learning-dependent molecular abnormalities found in several ASD mice models, including those of identified genetic mutations. We suggest that IGF-II represents a potential novel therapeutic target for ASD.

Funding information:
  • NCATS NIH HHS - UL1 TR000135(United States)
  • NIMH NIH HHS - F31 MH090636()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH074736()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R37 MH065635()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - T32 MH019524()
  • NIMH NIH HHS - T32 MH087004()

Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling Impairs Protein Turnover Regulation in Hypoxia-Induced Muscle Atrophy in Male Mice.

  • de Theije CC
  • Endocrinology
  • 2018 Jan 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hypoxemia may contribute to muscle wasting in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Muscle wasting develops when muscle proteolysis exceeds protein synthesis. Hypoxia induces skeletal muscle atrophy in mice, which can in part be attributed to reduced food intake. We hypothesized that hypoxia elevates circulating corticosterone concentrations by reduced food intake and enhances glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in muscle, which causes elevated protein degradation signaling and dysregulates protein synthesis signaling during hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy. Muscle-specific GR knockout and control mice were subjected to normoxia, normobaric hypoxia (8% oxygen), or pair-feeding to the hypoxia group for 4 days. Plasma corticosterone and muscle GR signaling increased after hypoxia and pair-feeding. GR deficiency prevented muscle atrophy by pair-feeding but not by hypoxia. GR deficiency differentially affected activation of ubiquitin 26S-proteasome and autophagy proteolytic systems by pair-feeding and hypoxia. Reduced food intake suppressed mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity under normoxic but not hypoxic conditions, and this retained mTORC1 activity was mediated by GR. We conclude that GR signaling is required for muscle atrophy and increased expression of proteolysis-associated genes induced by decreased food intake under normoxic conditions. Under hypoxic conditions, muscle atrophy and elevated gene expression of the ubiquitin proteasomal system-associated E3 ligases Murf1 and Atrogin-1 are mostly independent of GR signaling. Furthermore, impaired inhibition of mTORC1 activity is GR-dependent in hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy.

Genetic Removal of eIF2α Kinase PERK in Mice Enables Hippocampal L-LTP Independent of mTORC1 Activity.

  • Zimmermann HR
  • J. Neurochem.
  • 2018 Jan 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Characterization of the molecular signaling pathways underlying protein synthesis-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity, such as late long-term potentiation (L-LTP), can provide insights not only into memory expression/maintenance under physiological conditions but also potential mechanisms associated with the pathogenesis of memory disorders. Here, we report in mice that L-LTP failure induced by the mammalian (mechanistic) target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitor rapamycin is reversed by brain-specific genetic deletion of PKR-like ER kinase, PERK (PERK KO), a kinase for eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). In contrast, genetic removal of general control non-derepressible-2, GCN2 (GCN2 KO), another eIF2α kinase, or treatment of hippocampal slices with the PERK inhibitor GSK2606414, does not rescue rapamycin-induced L-LTP failure, suggesting mechanisms independent of eIF2α phosphorylation. Moreover, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) is significantly decreased in PERK KO mice but unaltered in GCN2 KO mice or slices treated with the PERK inhibitor. Reduction of eEF2 phosphorylation results in increased general protein synthesis, and thus could contribute to the mTORC1-independent L-LTP in PERK KO mice. We further performed experiments on mutant mice with genetic removal of eEF2K (eEF2K KO), the only known kinase for eEF2, and found that L-LTP in eEF2K KO mice is insensitive to rapamycin. These data, for the first time, connect reduction of PERK activity with the regulation of translation elongation in enabling L-LTP independent of mTORC1. Thus, our findings indicate previously unrecognized levels of complexity in the regulation of protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - F31 AG054113()
  • NIA NIH HHS - K99 AG044469()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R00 AG044469()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG055581()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG056622()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007739(United States)

mTORC1 Inactivation Promotes Colitis-Induced Colorectal Cancer but Protects from APC Loss-Dependent Tumorigenesis.

  • Brandt M
  • Cell Metab.
  • 2018 Jan 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Dietary habits that can induce inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are major colorectal cancer (CRC) risk factors, but mechanisms linking nutrients, IBD, and CRC are unknown. Using human data and mouse models, we show that mTORC1 inactivation-induced chromosomal instability impairs intestinal crypt proliferation and regeneration, CDK4/6 dependently. This triggers interleukin (IL)-6-associated reparative inflammation, inducing crypt hyper-proliferation, wound healing, and CRC. Blocking IL-6 signaling or reactivating mTORC1 reduces inflammation-induced CRC, so mTORC1 activation suppresses tumorigenesis in IBD. Conversely, mTORC1 inactivation is beneficial in APC loss-dependent CRC. Thus, IL-6 blockers or protein-rich-diet-linked mTORC1 activation may prevent IBD-associated CRC. However, abolishing mTORC1 can mitigate CRC in predisposed patients with APC mutations. Our work reveals mTORC1 oncogenic and tumor-suppressive roles in intestinal epithelium and avenues to optimized and personalized therapeutic regimens for CRC.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007067(United States)

Roquin Suppresses the PI3K-mTOR Signaling Pathway to Inhibit T Helper Cell Differentiation and Conversion of Treg to Tfr Cells.

  • Essig K
  • Immunity
  • 2017 Dec 19

Literature context:


Abstract:

Roquin proteins preclude spontaneous T cell activation and aberrant differentiation of T follicular helper (Tfh) or T helper 17 (Th17) cells. Here we showed that deletion of Roquin-encoding alleles specifically in regulatory T (Treg) cells also caused the activation of conventional T cells. Roquin-deficient Treg cells downregulated CD25, acquired a follicular Treg (Tfr) cell phenotype, and suppressed germinal center reactions but could not protect from colitis. Roquin inhibited the PI3K-mTOR signaling pathway by upregulation of Pten through interfering with miR-17∼92 binding to an overlapping cis-element in the Pten 3' UTR, and downregulated the Foxo1-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch. Loss of Roquin enhanced Akt-mTOR signaling and protein synthesis, whereas inhibition of PI3K or mTOR in Roquin-deficient T cells corrected enhanced Tfh and Th17 or reduced iTreg cell differentiation. Thereby, Roquin-mediated control of PI3K-mTOR signaling prevents autoimmunity by restraining activation and differentiation of conventional T cells and specialization of Treg cells.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R37 HL036982(United States)

A Method for the Acute and Rapid Degradation of Endogenous Proteins.

  • Clift D
  • Cell
  • 2017 Dec 14

Literature context:


Abstract:

Methods for the targeted disruption of protein function have revolutionized science and greatly expedited the systematic characterization of genes. Two main approaches are currently used to disrupt protein function: DNA knockout and RNA interference, which act at the genome and mRNA level, respectively. A method that directly alters endogenous protein levels is currently not available. Here, we present Trim-Away, a technique to degrade endogenous proteins acutely in mammalian cells without prior modification of the genome or mRNA. Trim-Away harnesses the cellular protein degradation machinery to remove unmodified native proteins within minutes of application. This rapidity minimizes the risk that phenotypes are compensated and that secondary, non-specific defects accumulate over time. Because Trim-Away utilizes antibodies, it can be applied to a wide range of target proteins using off-the-shelf reagents. Trim-Away allows the study of protein function in diverse cell types, including non-dividing primary cells where genome- and RNA-targeting methods are limited.

Funding information:
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - P30 DC04657(United States)

IL-1β Inhibits Connexin 43 and Disrupts Decidualization of Human Endometrial Stromal Cells Through ERK1/2 and p38 MAP Kinase.

  • Yu J
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Dec 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Inflammation can interfere with endometrial receptivity. We examined how interleukin 1β (IL-1β) affects expression of the uterine gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43), which is known to be critical for embryonic implantation. We used an in vitro model of human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), Western blotting, and a combination of validated, selective kinase inhibitors to evaluate five canonical IL-1β signaling pathways. Cx43 and two other markers of ESC differentiation (prolactin and VEGF) were inhibited predominantly via IL-1β-activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase cascades. The findings were corroborated using small interfering RNA to silence critical genes in either pathway. By contrast, upregulation of endogenous pro-IL-1α and pro-IL-1β following recombinant IL-1β treatment was mediated via the Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. The clinicopharmacological significance of our findings is that multiple signaling cascades may need to be neutralized to reverse deleterious effects of IL-1β on human endometrial function.

Funding information:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council - BB/J014699/1(United Kingdom)

mTORC1-Mediated Inhibition of 4EBP1 Is Essential for Hedgehog Signaling-Driven Translation and Medulloblastoma.

  • Wu CC
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Dec 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) cooperates with Hedgehog (HH) signaling, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here we provide genetic, biochemical, and pharmacologic evidence that MTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-dependent translation is a prerequisite for HH signaling. The genetic loss of mTORC1 function inhibited HH signaling-driven growth of the cerebellum and medulloblastoma. Inhibiting translation or mTORC1 blocked HH signaling. Depleting 4EBP1, an mTORC1 target that inhibits translation, alleviated the dependence of HH signaling on mTORC1. Consistent with this, phosphorylated 4EBP1 levels were elevated in HH signaling-driven medulloblastomas in mice and humans. In mice, an mTORC1 inhibitor suppressed medulloblastoma driven by a mutant SMO that is inherently resistant to existing SMO inhibitors, prolonging the survival of the mice. Our study reveals that mTORC1-mediated translation is a key component of HH signaling and an important target for treating medulloblastoma and other cancers driven by HH signaling.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA021765()

Autophagy inhibition in endogenous and nutrient-deprived conditions reduces dorsal root ganglia neuron survival and neurite growth in vitro.

  • Clarke JP
  • J. Neurosci. Res.
  • 2017 Nov 29

Literature context:


Abstract:

Peripheral neuropathies can result in cytoskeletal changes in axons, ultimately leading to Wallerian degeneration and cell death. Recently, autophagy has been studied as a potential target for improving axonal survival and growth during peripheral nerve damage. This study investigates the influence of autophagy on adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron survival and axonal growth under control and nutrient deprivation conditions. Constitutive autophagy was modulated with pharmacological activators (rapamycin; Rapa) and inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A1) in conjunction with either a nutrient-stable environment (standard culture medium) or a nutrient-deprived environment (Hank's balanced salt solution + Ca(2+) /Mg(2+) ). The results demonstrated that autophagy inhibition decreased cell viability and reduced neurite growth and branching complexity. Although autophagy was upregulated with nutrient deprivation compared with the control, it was not further activated by rapamycin, suggesting a threshold level of autophagy. Overall, both cellular and biochemical approaches combined to show the influence of autophagy on adult DRG neuron survival and growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Focal Adhesion- and IGF1R-Dependent Survival and Migratory Pathways Mediate Tumor Resistance to mTORC1/2 Inhibition.

  • Yoon SO
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Aug 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

Aberrant signaling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) contributes to the devastating features of cancer cells. Thus, mTOR is a critical therapeutic target and catalytic inhibitors are being investigated as anti-cancer drugs. Although mTOR inhibitors initially block cell proliferation, cell viability and migration in some cancer cells are quickly restored. Despite sustained inhibition of mTORC1/2 signaling, Akt, a kinase regulating cell survival and migration, regains phosphorylation at its regulatory sites. Mechanistically, mTORC1/2 inhibition promotes reorganization of integrin/focal adhesion kinase-mediated adhesomes, induction of IGFR/IR-dependent PI3K activation, and Akt phosphorylation via an integrin/FAK/IGFR-dependent process. This resistance mechanism contributes to xenograft tumor cell growth, which is prevented with mTOR plus IGFR inhibitors, supporting this combination as a therapeutic approach for cancers.

LARP1 functions as a molecular switch for mTORC1-mediated translation of an essential class of mRNAs.

  • Hong S
  • Elife
  • 2017 Jun 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

The RNA binding protein, LARP1, has been proposed to function downstream of mTORC1 to regulate the translation of 5'TOP mRNAs such as those encoding ribosome proteins (RP). However, the roles of LARP1 in the translation of 5'TOP mRNAs are controversial and its regulatory roles in mTORC1-mediated translation remain unclear. Here we show that LARP1 is a direct substrate of mTORC1 and Akt/S6K1. Deep sequencing of LARP1-bound mRNAs reveal that non-phosphorylated LARP1 interacts with both 5' and 3'UTRs of RP mRNAs and inhibits their translation. Importantly, phosphorylation of LARP1 by mTORC1 and Akt/S6K1 dissociates it from 5'UTRs and relieves its inhibitory activity on RP mRNA translation. Concomitantly, phosphorylated LARP1 scaffolds mTORC1 on the 3'UTRs of translationally-competent RP mRNAs to facilitate mTORC1-dependent induction of translation initiation. Thus, in response to cellular mTOR activity, LARP1 serves as a phosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch for turning off or on RP mRNA translation and subsequent ribosome biogenesis.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK083491()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM088565()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM110019()

Germinal Center Selection and Affinity Maturation Require Dynamic Regulation of mTORC1 Kinase.

  • Ersching J
  • Immunity
  • 2017 Jun 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

During antibody affinity maturation, germinal center (GC) B cells cycle between affinity-driven selection in the light zone (LZ) and proliferation and somatic hypermutation in the dark zone (DZ). Although selection of GC B cells is triggered by antigen-dependent signals delivered in the LZ, DZ proliferation occurs in the absence of such signals. We show that positive selection triggered by T cell help activates the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which promotes the anabolic program that supports DZ proliferation. Blocking mTORC1 prior to growth prevented clonal expansion, whereas blockade after cells reached peak size had little to no effect. Conversely, constitutively active mTORC1 led to DZ enrichment but loss of competitiveness and impaired affinity maturation. Thus, mTORC1 activation is required for fueling B cells prior to DZ proliferation rather than for allowing cell-cycle progression itself and must be regulated dynamically during cyclic re-entry to ensure efficient affinity-based selection.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R00 CA151827()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA103866()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI047389()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI119006()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R37 AI047389()
  • NIH HHS - DP5 OD012146()

Manganese-Stimulated Kisspeptin Is Mediated by the IGF-1/Akt/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Pathway in the Prepubertal Female Rat.

  • Srivastava VK
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 May 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Low-dose administration of manganese chloride (MnCl2) causes release of hypothalamic LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and advances puberty in rat. Recently, this element was shown to up-regulate mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), kisspeptin gene (KiSS-1), and LHRH gene expressions in the brain preoptic area (POA)/anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus. Because these genes are critical for puberty, this study was conducted to identify the upstream mechanism by which Mn activates the mTOR/KiSS-1 pathway. On day 12, immature female rats began receiving a daily supplemental dose of 10 mg/kg of MnCl2 or saline by gavage, and POA/AVPV tissues were collected on day 29 for specific protein assessments. Another experiment assessed in vitro IGF-1 release in response to Mn and assessed signal transduction pathways in the POA/AVPV region after Mn delivery into the third ventricle. Chronic Mn exposure increased (P < .05) basal expressions of mTOR and kisspeptin proteins. Mn increased protein kinase B (Akt) and Ras homolog enriched in brain, both capable of activating mTOR. Central Mn delivery increased expressions of phosphorylated IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) (P < .05) and Akt (P < .01) in the POA/AVPV region. The previous central delivery of JB1, an IGF-1R antagonist, blocked Mn-induced expressions of both phosphorylated IGF-1R and Akt. Downstream to Akt, centrally administered Mn increased tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (P < .05), Ras homolog enriched in brain (P < .01), mTOR (P < .05), and kisspeptin (P < .05). Finally, we observed that the early puberty induced by Mn was blocked by the administration of an mTOR inhibitor. These results suggest that Mn acts, at least in part, through the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway to influence prepubertal kisspeptin and LHRH.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R37 DK33165(United States)

PI(3,4,5)P3 Engagement Restricts Akt Activity to Cellular Membranes.

  • Ebner M
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Feb 2

Literature context:


Abstract:

Protein kinase B/Akt regulates cellular metabolism, survival, and proliferation in response to hormones and growth factors. Hyperactivation of Akt is frequently observed in cancer, while Akt inactivation is associated with severe diabetes. Here, we investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms that maintain Akt activity proportional to the activating stimulus. We show that binding of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) or PI(3,4)P2 to the PH domain allosterically activates Akt by promoting high-affinity substrate binding. Conversely, dissociation from PIP3 was rate limiting for Akt dephosphorylation, dependent on the presence of the PH domain. In cells, active Akt associated primarily with cellular membranes. In contrast, a transforming mutation that uncouples kinase activation from PIP3 resulted in the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated, active Akt in the cytosol. Our results suggest that intramolecular allosteric and cellular mechanisms cooperate to restrict Akt activity to cellular membranes, thereby enhancing the fidelity of Akt signaling and the specificity of downstream substrate phosphorylation.

Context Specificity in Causal Signaling Networks Revealed by Phosphoprotein Profiling.

  • Hill SM
  • Cell Syst
  • 2017 Jan 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Signaling networks downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases are among the most extensively studied biological networks, but new approaches are needed to elucidate causal relationships between network components and understand how such relationships are influenced by biological context and disease. Here, we investigate the context specificity of signaling networks within a causal conceptual framework using reverse-phase protein array time-course assays and network analysis approaches. We focus on a well-defined set of signaling proteins profiled under inhibition with five kinase inhibitors in 32 contexts: four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, UACC812, BT20, and BT549) under eight stimulus conditions. The data, spanning multiple pathways and comprising ∼70,000 phosphoprotein and ∼260,000 protein measurements, provide a wealth of testable, context-specific hypotheses, several of which we experimentally validate. Furthermore, the data provide a unique resource for computational methods development, permitting empirical assessment of causal network learning in a complex, mammalian setting.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - MC_UP_0801/1()
  • Medical Research Council - MC_UP_1302/3()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA016672()
  • NCI NIH HHS - U54 CA112970()

Maternal Low Protein Isocaloric Diet Suppresses Pancreatic β-Cell Proliferation in Mouse Offspring via miR-15b.

  • Su Y
  • Endocrinology
  • 2016 Dec 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

The mechanism underlying the increased susceptibility of type 2 diabetes in offspring of maternal malnutrition is poorly determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that functional microRNAs (miRNAs) mediated the maternal low-protein (LP) isocaloric diet induced pancreatic β-cell impairment. We performed miRNA profiling in the islets from offspring of LP and control diet mothers to explore the potential functional miRNAs responsible for β-cell dysfunction. We found that LP offspring exhibited impaired glucose tolerance due to decreased β-cell mass and insulin secretion. Reduction in the β-cell proliferation rate and cell size contributed to the decreased β-cell mass. MiR-15b was up-regulated in the islets of LP offspring. The up-regulated miR-15b inhibited pancreatic β-cell proliferation via targeting cyclin D1 and cyclin D2. Inhibition of miR-15b in LP islet cells restored β-cell proliferation and insulin secretion. Our findings demonstrate that miR-15b is critical for the regulation of pancreatic β-cells in offspring of maternal protein restriction, which may provide a further insight for β-cell exhaustion originated from intrauterine growth restriction.

Funding information:
  • NIH HHS - U42 OD011140(United States)

An Ancient, Unified Mechanism for Metformin Growth Inhibition in C. elegans and Cancer.

  • Wu L
  • Cell
  • 2016 Dec 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Metformin has utility in cancer prevention and treatment, though the mechanisms for these effects remain elusive. Through genetic screening in C. elegans, we uncover two metformin response elements: the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family member-10 (ACAD10). We demonstrate that biguanides inhibit growth by inhibiting mitochondrial respiratory capacity, which restrains transit of the RagA-RagC GTPase heterodimer through the NPC. Nuclear exclusion renders RagC incapable of gaining the GDP-bound state necessary to stimulate mTORC1. Biguanide-induced inactivation of mTORC1 subsequently inhibits growth through transcriptional induction of ACAD10. This ancient metformin response pathway is conserved from worms to humans. Both restricted nuclear pore transit and upregulation of ACAD10 are required for biguanides to reduce viability in melanoma and pancreatic cancer cells, and to extend C. elegans lifespan. This pathway provides a unified mechanism by which metformin kills cancer cells and extends lifespan, and illuminates potential cancer targets. PAPERCLIP.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA166717()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - K01 DK098285()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - K08 DK087941()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK040561()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - P30 DK057521()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK072041()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK101522()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R03 DK098436()
  • NIH HHS - P40 OD010440()

Dynamics of mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids.

  • Manifava M
  • Elife
  • 2016 Oct 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Amino acids are essential activators of mTORC1 via a complex containing RAG GTPases, RAGULATOR and the vacuolar ATPase. Sensing of amino acids causes translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomes, an obligate step for activation. To examine the spatial and temporal dynamics of this translocation, we used live imaging of the mTORC1 component RAPTOR and a cell permeant fluorescent analogue of di-leucine methyl ester. Translocation to lysosomes is a transient event, occurring within 2 min of aa addition and peaking within 5 min. It is temporally coupled with fluorescent leucine appearance in lysosomes and is sustained in comparison to aa stimulation. Sestrin2 and the vacuolar ATPase are negative and positive regulators of mTORC1 activity in our experimental system. Of note, phosphorylation of canonical mTORC1 targets is delayed compared to lysosomal translocation suggesting a dynamic and transient passage of mTORC1 from the lysosomal surface before targetting its substrates elsewhere.

A Syndromic Intellectual Disability Disorder Caused by Variants in TELO2, a Gene Encoding a Component of the TTT Complex.

  • You J
  • Am. J. Hum. Genet.
  • 2016 May 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

The proteins encoded by TELO2, TTI1, and TTI2 interact to form the TTT complex, a co-chaperone for maturation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases (PIKKs). Here we report six affected individuals from four families with intellectual disability (ID) and neurological and other congenital abnormalities associated with compound heterozygous variants in TELO2. Although their fibroblasts showed reduced steady-state levels of TELO2 and the other components of the TTT complex, PIKK functions were normal in cellular assays. Our results suggest that these TELO2 missense variants result in loss of function, perturb TTT complex stability, and cause an autosomal-recessive syndromic form of ID.

Thyroid Hormone Stimulation of Autophagy Is Essential for Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Activity in Skeletal Muscle.

  • Lesmana R
  • Endocrinology
  • 2016 Jan 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Thyroid hormone (TH) and autophagy share similar functions in regulating skeletal muscle growth, regeneration, and differentiation. Although TH recently has been shown to increase autophagy in liver, the regulation and role of autophagy by this hormone in skeletal muscle is not known. Here, using both in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrated that TH induces autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in skeletal muscle. TH induction of autophagy involved reactive oxygen species (ROS) stimulation of 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-Unc-51-like kinase 1 (Ulk1) signaling. TH also increased mRNA and protein expression of key autophagy genes, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), Sequestosome 1 (p62), and Ulk1, as well as genes that modulated autophagy and Forkhead box O (FOXO) 1/3a. TH increased mitochondrial protein synthesis and number as well as basal mitochondrial O2 consumption, ATP turnover, and maximal respiratory capacity. Surprisingly, mitochondrial activity and biogenesis were blunted when autophagy was blocked in muscle cells by Autophagy-related gene (Atg)5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Induction of ROS and 5'adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by TH played a significant role in the up-regulation of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PPARGC1A), the key regulator of mitochondrial synthesis. In summary, our findings showed that TH-mediated autophagy was essential for stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in skeletal muscle. Moreover, autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis were coupled in skeletal muscle via TH induction of mitochondrial activity and ROS generation.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM064709(United States)

rpS6 regulates blood-testis barrier dynamics through Arp3-mediated actin microfilament organization in rat sertoli cells. An in vitro study.

  • Mok KW
  • Endocrinology
  • 2015 May 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the seminiferous epithelium of rat testes, preleptotene spermatocytes residing in the basal compartment are transported across the blood-testis barrier (BTB) to enter the adluminal compartment at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle. This process involves redistribution of tight junction (TJ) proteins via reorganization of actin cytoskeleton in Sertoli cells that serves as attachment site for adhesion protein complexes. Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), a downstream molecule of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1), participates in this process via a yet-to-be defined mechanism. Here, we constructed an rpS6 quadruple phosphomimetic mutant by converting Ser residues at 235, 236, 240, and 244 to Glu via site-directed mutagenesis, making this mutant constitutively active. When this rpS6 mutant was overexpressed in Sertoli cells cultured in vitro with an established TJ barrier mimicking the BTB in vivo, it perturbed the TJ permeability by down-regulating and redistributing TJ proteins at the cell-cell interface. These changes are mediated by a reorganization of actin microfilaments, which was triggered by a redistribution of activated actin-related protein 3 (Arp3) as well as changes in Arp3-neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASP) interaction. This in turn induced reorganization of actin microfilaments, converting them from a "bundled" to an "unbundled/branched" configuration, concomitant with a reduced actin bundling activity, thereby destabilizing the TJ-barrier function. These changes were mediated by Akt (transforming oncogene of v-akt), because an Akt knockdown by RNA interference was able to mimic the phenotypes of rpS6 mutant overexpression at the Sertoli cell BTB. In summary, this study illustrates a mechanism by which mTORC1 signal complex regulates BTB function through rpS6 downstream by modulating actin organization via the Arp2/3 complex, which may be applicable to other tissue barriers.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS-23805(United States)

Circulating PGRN is significantly associated with systemic insulin sensitivity and autophagic activity in metabolic syndrome.

  • Li H
  • Endocrinology
  • 2014 Sep 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted protein that has recently emerged as an important regulatory adipokine of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. We report here that serum PGRN concentrations were significantly higher in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) than in subjects without MS and correlated positively with body mass index, waist circumference, fasting insulin, fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c, triglyceride, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and were inversely related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and homeostasis model assessment of β cell function. Subgroup analysis in 32 subjects showed that elevated expression levels of PGRN were positively correlated with increased autophagy markers LC3 and Atg7 proteins in omental adipose tissue of subjects with MS. Consistent with these findings, the enhanced PGRN levels were also observed in multiple insulin-resistant cellular models, whereas PGRN-deficient adipocytes were more susceptible to insulin action and refractory to tunicamycin-induced autophagic disorders. PGRN remarkably attenuated insulin sensitivity, increased autophagic activity, and triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cultured human adipocytes, whereas these effects were nullified by reduction of ER stress with phenylbutyric acid chemical chaperone treatment. In addition, PGRN-induced ER stress and impaired insulin sensitivity were improved in TNFR1(-/-) cells, indicating a causative role of TNF receptor in the action of PGRN. Collectively, our findings suggest that circulating PGRN is significantly associated with systemic insulin sensitivity and autophagic activity in adipose tissue and support the notion that PGRN functions as a potential link between chronic inflammation and insulin resistance.

Funding information:
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR057759(United States)

Genetic removal of matrix metalloproteinase 9 rescues the symptoms of fragile X syndrome in a mouse model.

  • Sidhu H
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2014 Jul 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Fmr1 knock-out (ko) mice display key features of fragile X syndrome (FXS), including delayed dendritic spine maturation and FXS-associated behaviors, such as poor socialization, obsessive-compulsive behavior, and hyperactivity. Here we provide conclusive evidence that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is necessary to the development of FXS-associated defects in Fmr1 ko mice. Genetic disruption of Mmp-9 rescued key aspects of Fmr1 deficiency, including dendritic spine abnormalities, abnormal mGluR5-dependent LTD, as well as aberrant behaviors in open field and social novelty tests. Remarkably, MMP-9 deficiency also corrected non-neural features of Fmr1 deficiency-specifically macroorchidism-indicating that MMP-9 dysregulation contributes to FXS-associated abnormalities outside the CNS. Further, MMP-9 deficiency suppressed elevations of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E phosphorylation seen in Fmr1 ko mice, which are also associated with other autistic spectrum disorders. These findings establish that MMP-9 is critical to the mechanisms responsible for neural and non-neural aspects of the FXS phenotype.

Inactivation of AKT induces cellular senescence in uterine leiomyoma.

  • Xu X
  • Endocrinology
  • 2014 Apr 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are a major public health problem. Current medical treatments with GnRH analogs do not provide long-term benefit. Thus, permanent shrinkage or inhibition of fibroid growth via medical means remains a challenge. The AKT pathway is a major growth and survival pathway for fibroids. We propose that AKT inhibition results in a transient regulation of specific mechanisms that ultimately drive cells into cellular senescence or cell death. In this study, we investigated specific mechanisms of AKT inhibition that resulted in senescence. We observed that administration of MK-2206, an allosteric AKT inhibitor, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, up-regulated the microRNA miR-182 and several senescence-associated genes (including p16, p53, p21, and β-galactosidase), and drove leiomyoma cells into stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). Moreover, induction of SIPS was mediated by HMGA2, which colocalized to senescence-associated heterochromatin foci. This study provides a conceivable molecular mechanism of SIPS by AKT inhibition in fibroids.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS073875(United States)