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Rabbit Anti-Serotonin (5-HT) Antibody, Unconjugated

RRID:AB_1624670

Antibody ID

AB_1624670

Target Antigen

Serotonin (5-HT) bovine, canine, donkey, feline, goat, guinea pig, hamster, horse, human, mouse, other, porcine, rabbit, rat, sheep, simian, mammal

Proper Citation

(Acris Antibodies GmbH Cat# RA20080-100, RRID:AB_1624670)

Clonality

unknown

Reference

PMID:28472655

Comments

manufacturer recommendations: Immunofluorescence; Immunohistochemistry; Immunohistochemistry (frozen), Immunofluorescence

Host Organism

rabbit

Vendor

Acris Antibodies GmbH

Cat Num

RA20080-100

Publications that use this research resource

Serotonergic Projections Govern Postnatal Neuroblast Migration.

  • García-González D
  • Neuron
  • 2017 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

In many vertebrates, postnatally generated neurons often migrate long distances to reach their final destination, where they help shape local circuit activity. Concerted action of extrinsic stimuli is required to regulate long-distance migration. Some migratory principles are evolutionarily conserved, whereas others are species and cell type specific. Here we identified a serotonergic mechanism that governs migration of postnatally generated neurons in the mouse brain. Serotonergic axons originating from the raphe nuclei exhibit a conspicuous alignment with subventricular zone-derived neuroblasts. Optogenetic axonal activation provides functional evidence for serotonergic modulation of neuroblast migration. Furthermore, we show that the underlying mechanism involves serotonin receptor 3A (5HT3A)-mediated calcium influx. Thus, 5HT3A receptor deletion in neuroblasts impaired speed and directionality of migration and abolished calcium spikes. We speculate that serotonergic modulation of postnatally generated neuroblast migration is evolutionarily conserved as indicated by the presence of serotonergic axons in migratory paths in other vertebrates.