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Goat Anti-Mouse IgG (H+L) Highly Cross-adsorbed Antibody, Alexa Fluor 633 Conjugated

RRID:AB_141459

Antibody ID

AB_2535719

Target Antigen

Mouse IgG (H+L) mouse

Proper Citation

(Molecular Probes Cat# A-21052, RRID:AB_2535719)

Clonality

polyclonal antibody

Comments

Discontinued; This product offered by Molecular Probes (Invitrogen), now part of Thermo Fisher. This entry has been consolidated with the Thermo Fisher version by curator 1/2018, The previous RRID was RRID: AB_141459.

Host Organism

goat

Vendor

Molecular Probes

The cJUN NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway contributes to mouse mammary gland remodeling during involution.

  • Girnius N
  • Cell Death Differ.
  • 2018 Mar 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

Involution returns the lactating mammary gland to a quiescent state after weaning. The mechanism of involution involves collapse of the mammary epithelial cell compartment. To test whether the cJUN NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway contributes to involution, we established mice with JNK deficiency in the mammary epithelium. We found that JNK is required for efficient involution. JNK deficiency did not alter the STAT3/5 or SMAD2/3 signaling pathways that have been previously implicated in this process. Nevertheless, JNK promotes the expression of genes that drive involution, including matrix metalloproteases, cathepsins, and BH3-only proteins. These data demonstrate that JNK has a key role in mammary gland involution post lactation.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK107220()
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK112698()
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - P30 ES000210(United States)

Atg5 Disassociates the V1V0-ATPase to Promote Exosome Production and Tumor Metastasis Independent of Canonical Macroautophagy.

  • Guo H
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Dec 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Autophagy and autophagy-related genes (Atg) have been attributed prominent roles in tumorigenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes are also implicated in cancer metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that exosome production is strongly reduced in cells lacking Atg5 and Atg16L1, but this is independent of Atg7 and canonical autophagy. Atg5 specifically decreases acidification of late endosomes where exosomes are produced, disrupting the acidifying V1V0-ATPase by removing a regulatory component, ATP6V1E1, into exosomes. The effect of Atg5 on exosome production promotes the migration and in vivo metastasis of orthotopic breast cancer cells. These findings uncover mechanisms controlling exosome release and identify means by which autophagy-related genes can contribute to metastasis in autophagy-independent pathways.

Funding information:
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR40864(United States)

New tools for "hot-wiring" clathrin-mediated endocytosis with temporal and spatial precision.

  • Wood LA
  • J. Cell Biol.
  • 2017 Dec 4

Literature context:


Abstract:

Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the major route of receptor internalization at the plasma membrane. Analysis of constitutive CME is difficult because the initiation of endocytic events is unpredictable. When and where a clathrin-coated pit will form and what cargo it will contain are difficult to foresee. Here we describe a series of genetically encoded reporters that allow the initiation of CME on demand. A clathrin-binding protein fragment ("hook") is inducibly attached to an "anchor" protein at the plasma membrane, which triggers the formation of new clathrin-coated vesicles. Our design incorporates temporal and spatial control by the use of chemical and optogenetic methods for inducing hook-anchor attachment. Moreover, the cargo is defined. Because several steps in vesicle creation are bypassed, we term it "hot-wiring." We use hot-wired endocytosis to describe the functional interactions between clathrin and AP2. Two distinct sites on the β2 subunit, one on the hinge and the other on the appendage, are necessary and sufficient for functional clathrin engagement.

Enhanced AMPA Receptor Trafficking Mediates the Anorexigenic Effect of Endogenous Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in the Paraventricular Hypothalamus.

  • Liu J
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Nov 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glucagon-like Peptide 1 (GLP-1)-expressing neurons in the hindbrain send robust projections to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), which is involved in the regulation of food intake. Here, we describe that stimulation of GLP-1 afferent fibers within the PVN is sufficient to suppress food intake independent of glutamate release. We also show that GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation augments excitatory synaptic strength in PVN corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons, with GLP-1R activation promoting a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent signaling cascade leading to phosphorylation of serine S845 on GluA1 AMPA receptors and their trafficking to the plasma membrane. Finally, we show that postnatal depletion of GLP-1R in the PVN increases food intake and causes obesity. This study provides a comprehensive multi-level (circuit, synaptic, and molecular) explanation of how food intake behavior and body weight are regulated by endogenous central GLP-1. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

Homeostatic plasticity shapes the visual system's first synapse.

  • Johnson RE
  • Nat Commun
  • 2017 Oct 31

Literature context:


Abstract:

Vision in dim light depends on synapses between rods and rod bipolar cells (RBCs). Here, we find that these synapses exist in multiple configurations, in which single release sites of rods are apposed by one to three postsynaptic densities (PSDs). Single RBCs often form multiple PSDs with one rod; and neighboring RBCs share ~13% of their inputs. Rod-RBC synapses develop while ~7% of RBCs undergo programmed cell death (PCD). Although PCD is common throughout the nervous system, its influences on circuit development and function are not well understood. We generate mice in which ~53 and ~93% of RBCs, respectively, are removed during development. In these mice, dendrites of the remaining RBCs expand in graded fashion independent of light-evoked input. As RBC dendrites expand, they form fewer multi-PSD contacts with rods. Electrophysiological recordings indicate that this homeostatic co-regulation of neurite and synapse development preserves retinal function in dim light.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY023341()
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY026978()
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY027411()

Reciprocal synapses between mushroom body and dopamine neurons form a positive feedback loop required for learning.

  • Cervantes-Sandoval I
  • Elife
  • 2017 May 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Current thought envisions dopamine neurons conveying the reinforcing effect of the unconditioned stimulus during associative learning to the axons of Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells for normal olfactory learning. Here, we show using functional GFP reconstitution experiments that Kenyon cells and dopamine neurons from axoaxonic reciprocal synapses. The dopamine neurons receive cholinergic input via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from the Kenyon cells; knocking down these receptors impairs olfactory learning revealing the importance of these receptors at the synapse. Blocking the synaptic output of Kenyon cells during olfactory conditioning reduces presynaptic calcium transients in dopamine neurons, a finding consistent with reciprocal communication. Moreover, silencing Kenyon cells decreases the normal chronic activity of the dopamine neurons. Our results reveal a new and critical role for positive feedback onto dopamine neurons through reciprocal connections with Kenyon cells for normal olfactory learning.

Representations of Novelty and Familiarity in a Mushroom Body Compartment.

  • Hattori D
  • Cell
  • 2017 May 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Animals exhibit a behavioral response to novel sensory stimuli about which they have no prior knowledge. We have examined the neural and behavioral correlates of novelty and familiarity in the olfactory system of Drosophila. Novel odors elicit strong activity in output neurons (MBONs) of the α'3 compartment of the mushroom body that is rapidly suppressed upon repeated exposure to the same odor. This transition in neural activity upon familiarization requires odor-evoked activity in the dopaminergic neuron innervating this compartment. Moreover, exposure of a fly to novel odors evokes an alerting response that can also be elicited by optogenetic activation of α'3 MBONs. Silencing these MBONs eliminates the alerting behavior. These data suggest that the α'3 compartment plays a causal role in the behavioral response to novel and familiar stimuli as a consequence of dopamine-mediated plasticity at the Kenyon cell-MBONα'3 synapse.

Complement Component 3 Adapts the Cerebrospinal Fluid for Leptomeningeal Metastasis.

  • Boire A
  • Cell
  • 2017 Mar 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

We molecularly dissected leptomeningeal metastasis, or spread of cancer to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is a frequent and fatal condition mediated by unknown mechanisms. We selected lung and breast cancer cell lines for the ability to infiltrate and grow in CSF, a remarkably acellular, mitogen-poor metastasis microenvironment. Complement component 3 (C3) was upregulated in four leptomeningeal metastatic models and proved necessary for cancer growth within the leptomeningeal space. In human disease, cancer cells within the CSF produced C3 in correlation with clinical course. C3 expression in primary tumors was predictive of leptomeningeal relapse. Mechanistically, we found that cancer-cell-derived C3 activates the C3a receptor in the choroid plexus epithelium to disrupt the blood-CSF barrier. This effect allows plasma components, including amphiregulin, and other mitogens to enter the CSF and promote cancer cell growth. Pharmacologic interference with C3 signaling proved therapeutically beneficial in suppressing leptomeningeal metastasis in these preclinical models.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P01 CA129243()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA008748()
  • NCI NIH HHS - U54 CA163167()

MicroRNA miR-29 controls a compensatory response to limit neuronal iron accumulation during adult life and aging.

  • Ripa R
  • BMC Biol.
  • 2017 Feb 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

BACKGROUND: A widespread modulation of gene expression occurs in the aging brain, but little is known as to the upstream drivers of these changes. MicroRNAs emerged as fine regulators of gene expression in many biological contexts and they are modulated by age. MicroRNAs may therefore be part of the upstream drivers of the global gene expression modulation correlated with aging and aging-related phenotypes. RESULTS: Here, we show that microRNA-29 (miR-29) is induced during aging in short-lived turquoise killifish brain and genetic antagonism of its function induces a gene-expression signature typical of aging. Mechanicistically, we identified Ireb2 (a master gene for intracellular iron delivery that encodes for IRP2 protein), as a novel miR-29 target. MiR-29 is induced by iron loading and, in turn, it reduces IRP2 expression in vivo, therefore limiting intracellular iron delivery in neurons. Genetically modified fish with neuro-specific miR-29 deficiency exhibit increased levels of IRP2 and transferrin receptor, increased iron content, and oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that age-dependent miR-29 upregulation is an adaptive mechanism that counteracts the expression of some aging-related phenotypes and its anti-aging activity is primarily exerted by regulating intracellular iron homeostasis limiting excessive iron-exposure in neurons.

Elimination of paternal mitochondria in mouse embryos occurs through autophagic degradation dependent on PARKIN and MUL1.

  • Rojansky R
  • Elife
  • 2016 Nov 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

A defining feature of mitochondria is their maternal mode of inheritance. However, little is understood about the cellular mechanism through which paternal mitochondria, delivered from sperm, are eliminated from early mammalian embryos. Autophagy has been implicated in nematodes, but whether this mechanism is conserved in mammals has been disputed. Here, we show that cultured mouse fibroblasts and pre-implantation embryos use a common pathway for elimination of mitochondria. Both situations utilize mitophagy, in which mitochondria are sequestered by autophagosomes and delivered to lysosomes for degradation. The E3 ubiquitin ligases PARKIN and MUL1 play redundant roles in elimination of paternal mitochondria. The process is associated with depolarization of paternal mitochondria and additionally requires the mitochondrial outer membrane protein FIS1, the autophagy adaptor P62, and PINK1 kinase. Our results indicate that strict maternal transmission of mitochondria relies on mitophagy and uncover a collaboration between MUL1 and PARKIN in this process.

Sleep deprivation causes memory deficits by negatively impacting neuronal connectivity in hippocampal area CA1.

  • Havekes R
  • Elife
  • 2016 Aug 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Brief periods of sleep loss have long-lasting consequences such as impaired memory consolidation. Structural changes in synaptic connectivity have been proposed as a substrate of memory storage. Here, we examine the impact of brief periods of sleep deprivation on dendritic structure. In mice, we find that five hours of sleep deprivation decreases dendritic spine numbers selectively in hippocampal area CA1 and increased activity of the filamentous actin severing protein cofilin. Recovery sleep normalizes these structural alterations. Suppression of cofilin function prevents spine loss, deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and impairments in long-term memory caused by sleep deprivation. The elevated cofilin activity is caused by cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase-4A5 (PDE4A5), which hampers cAMP-PKA-LIMK signaling. Attenuating PDE4A5 function prevents changes in cAMP-PKA-LIMK-cofilin signaling and cognitive deficits associated with sleep deprivation. Our work demonstrates the necessity of an intact cAMP-PDE4-PKA-LIMK-cofilin activation-signaling pathway for sleep deprivation-induced memory disruption and reduction in hippocampal spine density.

Scribble Scaffolds a Signalosome for Active Forgetting.

  • Cervantes-Sandoval I
  • Neuron
  • 2016 Jun 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Forgetting, one part of the brain's memory management system, provides balance to the encoding and consolidation of new information by removing unused or unwanted memories or by suppressing their expression. Recent studies identified the small G protein, Rac1, as a key player in the Drosophila mushroom bodies neurons (MBn) for active forgetting. We subsequently discovered that a few dopaminergic neurons (DAn) that innervate the MBn mediate forgetting. Here we show that Scribble, a scaffolding protein known primarily for its role as a cell polarity determinant, orchestrates the intracellular signaling for normal forgetting. Knocking down scribble expression in either MBn or DAn impairs normal memory loss. Scribble interacts physically and genetically with Rac1, Pak3, and Cofilin within MBn, nucleating a forgetting signalosome that is downstream of dopaminergic inputs that regulate forgetting. These results bind disparate molecular players in active forgetting into a single signaling pathway: Dopamine→ Dopamine Receptor→ Scribble→ Rac→ Cofilin.

Expanding the power of recombinase-based labeling to uncover cellular diversity.

  • Plummer NW
  • Development
  • 2015 Dec 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Investigating the developmental, structural and functional complexity of mammalian tissues and organs depends on identifying and gaining experimental access to diverse cell populations. Here, we describe a set of recombinase-responsive fluorescent indicator alleles in mice that significantly extends our ability to uncover cellular diversity by exploiting the intrinsic genetic signatures that uniquely define cell types. Using a recombinase-based intersectional strategy, these new alleles uniquely permit non-invasive labeling of cells defined by the overlap of up to three distinct gene expression domains. In response to different combinations of Cre, Flp and Dre recombinases, they express eGFP and/or tdTomato to allow the visualization of full cellular morphology. Here, we demonstrate the value of these features through a proof-of-principle analysis of the central noradrenergic system. We label previously inaccessible subpopulations of noradrenergic neurons to reveal details of their three-dimensional architecture and axon projection profiles. These new indicator alleles will provide experimental access to cell populations at unprecedented resolution, facilitating analysis of their developmental origin and anatomical, molecular and physiological properties.

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor but not vesicular zinc promotes TrkB activation within mossy fibers of mouse hippocampus in vivo.

  • Helgager J
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2014 Dec 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The neurotrophin receptor, TrkB receptor tyrosine kinase, is critical to central nervous system (CNS) function in health and disease. Elucidating the ligands mediating TrkB activation in vivo will provide insights into its diverse roles in the CNS. The canonical ligand for TrkB is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A diversity of stimuli also can activate TrkB in the absence of BDNF, a mechanism termed transactivation. Zinc, a divalent cation packaged in synaptic vesicles along with glutamate in axons of mammalian cortical neurons, can transactivate TrkB in neurons and heterologous cells in vitro. Yet the contributions of BDNF and zinc to TrkB activation in vivo are unknown. To address these questions, we conducted immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the hippocampal mossy fiber axons and boutons using an antibody selective for pY816 of TrkB, a surrogate measure of TrkB activation. We found that conditional deletion of BDNF resulted in a reduction of pY816 in axons and synaptic boutons of hippocampal mossy fibers, thereby implicating BDNF in activation of TrkB in vivo. Unexpectedly, pY816 immunoreactivity was increased in axons but not synaptic boutons of mossy fibers in ZnT3 knockout mice that lack vesicular zinc. Marked increases of BDNF content were evident within the hippocampus of ZnT3 knockout mice and genetic elimination of BDNF reduced pY816 immunoreactivity in these mice, implicating BDNF in enhanced TrkB activation mediated by vesicular zinc depletion. These findings support the conclusion that BDNF but not vesicular zinc activates TrkB in hippocampal mossy fiber axons under physiological conditions.