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anti-HA-tag antibody

RRID:AB_10951811

Antibody ID

AB_10951811

Target Antigen

anti-HA-tag human

Proper Citation

(MBL International Cat# M180-3, RRID:AB_10951811)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Comments

manufacturer recommendations: IgG2b; IgG2 WB, IPP, FCM, ICC; Flow Cytometry; Western Blot; Immunohistochemistry; Immunoprecipitation; Immunocytochemistry

Host Organism

mouse

Vendor

MBL International

Endosomal Rab cycles regulate Parkin-mediated mitophagy.

  • Yamano K
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jan 23

Literature context:


Abstract:

Damaged mitochondria are selectively eliminated by mitophagy. Parkin and PINK1, gene products mutated in familial Parkinson's disease, play essential roles in mitophagy through ubiquitination of mitochondria. Cargo ubiquitination by E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin is important to trigger selective autophagy. Although autophagy receptors recruit LC3-labeled autophagic membranes onto damaged mitochondria, how other essential autophagy units such as ATG9A-integrated vesicles are recruited remains unclear. Here, using mammalian cultured cells, we demonstrate that RABGEF1, the upstream factor of the endosomal Rab GTPase cascade, is recruited to damaged mitochondria via ubiquitin binding downstream of Parkin. RABGEF1 directs the downstream Rab proteins, RAB5 and RAB7A, to damaged mitochondria, whose associations are further regulated by mitochondrial Rab-GAPs. Furthermore, depletion of RAB7A inhibited ATG9A vesicle assembly and subsequent encapsulation of the mitochondria by autophagic membranes. These results strongly suggest that endosomal Rab cycles on damaged mitochondria are a crucial regulator of mitophagy through assembling ATG9A vesicles.

Funding information:
  • Japan Science and Technology Agency - JPMJCR13M7(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - 16K15095(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP15H01196(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP16K18545(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP26000014(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP26111729(International)
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science - JP26840033(International)
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - R03 DE018415-02(United States)
  • NINDS NIH HHS - Intramural program(United States)

Spatial Activation of TORC1 Is Regulated by Hedgehog and E2F1 Signaling in the Drosophila Eye.

  • Kim W
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Aug 21

Literature context:


Abstract:

Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) regulates cell growth in response to nutrients and growth factors. Although TORC1 signaling has been thoroughly studied at the cellular level, the regulation of TORC1 in multicellular tissues and organs has remained elusive. Here we found that TORC1 is selectively activated in the second mitotic wave (SMW), the terminal synchronous cell division, of the developing Drosophila eye. We demonstrated that Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates TORC1 through E2F1 and the cyclin D/Cdk4 complex in the SMW, and this regulation is independent from insulin and amino acid signaling pathways. TORC1 is necessary for the proper G1/S transition of the cells, and the activation of TORC1 rescues the cell-cycle defect of Hh signaling-deficient cells in the SMW. Based on this evolutionarily conserved regulation of TORC1 by Hh signaling, we propose that Hh-dependent developmental signaling pathways spatially regulate TORC1 activity in multicellular organisms.

Funding information:
  • NIMHD NIH HHS - G12 MD007592(United States)

The Highly Dynamic Nature of ERdj5 Is Key to Efficient Elimination of Aberrant Protein Oligomers through ER-Associated Degradation.

  • Maegawa KI
  • Structure
  • 2017 Jun 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

ERdj5, composed of an N-terminal J domain followed by six thioredoxin-like domains, is the largest protein disulfide isomerase family member and functions as an ER-localized disulfide reductase that enhances ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Our previous studies indicated that ERdj5 comprises two regions, the N- and C-terminal clusters, separated by a linker loop and with distinct functional roles in ERAD. We here present a new crystal structure of ERdj5 with a largely different cluster arrangement relative to that in the original crystal structure. Single-molecule observation by high-speed atomic force microscopy visualized rapid cluster movement around the flexible linker loop, indicating the highly dynamic nature of ERdj5 in solution. ERdj5 mutants with a fixed-cluster orientation compromised the ERAD enhancement activity, likely because of less-efficient reduction of aberrantly formed disulfide bonds and prevented substrate transfer in the ERdj5-mediated ERAD pathway. We propose a significant role of ERdj5 conformational dynamics in ERAD of disulfide-linked oligomers.

SUMO-Targeted DNA Translocase Rrp2 Protects the Genome from Top2-Induced DNA Damage.

  • Wei Y
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The action of DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) creates transient DNA breaks that are normally concealed inside Top2-DNA covalent complexes. Top2 poisons, including ubiquitously present natural compounds and clinically used anti-cancer drugs, trap Top2-DNA complexes. Here, we show that cells actively prevent Top2 degradation to avoid the exposure of concealed DNA breaks. A genome-wide screen revealed that fission yeast cells lacking Rrp2, an Snf2-family DNA translocase, are strongly sensitive to Top2 poisons. Loss of Rrp2 enhances SUMOylation-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of Top2, which in turn increases DNA damage at sites where Top2-DNA complexes are trapped. Rrp2 possesses SUMO-binding ability and prevents excessive Top2 degradation by competing against the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) for SUMO chain binding and by displacing SUMOylated Top2 from DNA. The budding yeast homolog of Rrp2, Uls1, plays a similar role, indicating that this genome protection mechanism is widely employed, a finding with implications for cancer treatment.

TRIB3 Promotes APL Progression through Stabilization of the Oncoprotein PML-RARα and Inhibition of p53-Mediated Senescence.

  • Li K
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2017 May 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by the oncoprotein PML-RARα, which antagonizes myeloid differentiation and promotes APL-initiating cell self-renewal. Combined all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) with arsenic trioxide (As2O3) or chemotherapy dramatically improves the prognosis of APL patients. Here we report that expression of pseudokinase Tribble 3 (TRIB3) associates positively with APL progression and therapeutic resistance. The elevated TRIB3 expression promotes APL by interacting with PML-RARα and suppressing its sumoylation, ubiquitylation, and degradation. This represses PML nuclear body assembly, p53-mediated senescence, and cell differentiation, and supports cellular self-renewal. Genetically inhibiting TRIB3 expression or combination of a peptide disturbing TRIB3/PML-RARα interaction with ATRA/As2O3 eradicates APL by accelerating PML-RARα degradation. Our study provides insight into APL pathogenesis and a potential therapeutic option against APL.

Aubergine Controls Germline Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Progeny Differentiation via Distinct Mechanisms.

  • Ma X
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Apr 24

Literature context:


Abstract:

Piwi family protein Aubergine (Aub) maintains genome integrity in late germ cells of the Drosophila ovary through Piwi-associated RNA-mediated repression of transposon activities. Although it is highly expressed in germline stem cells (GSCs) and early progeny, it remains unclear whether it plays any roles in early GSC lineage development. Here we report that Aub promotes GSC self-renewal and GSC progeny differentiation. RNA-iCLIP results show that Aub binds the mRNAs encoding self-renewal and differentiation factors in cultured GSCs. Aub controls GSC self-renewal by preventing DNA-damage-induced Chk2 activation and by translationally controlling the expression of self-renewal factors. It promotes GSC progeny differentiation by translationally controlling the expression of differentiation factors, including Bam. Therefore, this study reveals a function of Aub in GSCs and their progeny, which promotes translation of self-renewal and differentiation factors by directly binding to its target mRNAs and interacting with translational initiation factors.

Funding information:
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - R01 HL133166(United States)