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GAPDH (G-9) antibody

RRID:AB_10847862

Antibody ID

AB_10847862

Target Antigen

GAPDH (G-9) mouse, rat, human, human

Proper Citation

(Santa Cruz Biotechnology Cat# sc-365062, RRID:AB_10847862)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Comments

validation status unknown check with seller; recommendations: Immunoprecipitation; Immunofluorescence; Western Blot; ELISA; WB, IP, IF, ELISA

Host Organism

mouse

Vendor

Santa Cruz Biotechnology

Distinct Activities of Glycolytic Enzymes Identify Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients with a more Aggressive Course and Resistance to Chemo-Immunotherapy.

  • Gdynia G
  • EBioMedicine
  • 2018 Jun 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

A higher capacity to grow under hypoxic conditions can lead to a more aggressive behavior of tumor cells. Determining tumor activity under hypoxia may identify chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with aggressive clinical course and predict response to chemo-immunotherapy (CIT). A metabolic score was generated by determining pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, key enzymes of glycolysis, ex vivo in primary CLL samples under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. This score was further correlated with clinical endpoints and response to CIT in 96 CLL patients. 45 patients were classified as metabolic high risk (HR), 51 as low risk (LR). Treatment-free survival (TFS) was significantly shorter in HR patients (median 394 vs 723 days, p = .021). 15 HR patients and 14 LR patients received CIT after sample acquisition. HR patients had a significantly shorter progression-free survival after treatment compared to LR patients (median 216 days vs not reached, p = .008). Multivariate analysis evaluating age, IGHV, TP53 deletion or mutation and 11q22-23 deletion besides the capacity of tumor cells to grow under severe hypoxic conditions identified the metabolic profile as the strongest independent risk factor for shorter TFS (hazard ratio 2.37, p = .011). The metabolic risk can provide prognostic and predictive information complementary to genetic biomarkers and identify patients who might benefit from alternative treatment approaches.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM086663(United States)

The SS18-SSX Fusion Oncoprotein Hijacks BAF Complex Targeting and Function to Drive Synovial Sarcoma.

  • McBride MJ
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2018 Jun 11

Literature context:


Abstract:

Synovial sarcoma (SS) is defined by the hallmark SS18-SSX fusion oncoprotein, which renders BAF complexes aberrant in two manners: gain of SSX to the SS18 subunit and concomitant loss of BAF47 subunit assembly. Here we demonstrate that SS18-SSX globally hijacks BAF complexes on chromatin to activate an SS transcriptional signature that we define using primary tumors and cell lines. Specifically, SS18-SSX retargets BAF complexes from enhancers to broad polycomb domains to oppose PRC2-mediated repression and activate bivalent genes. Upon suppression of SS18-SSX, reassembly of BAF47 restores enhancer activation, but is not required for proliferative arrest. These results establish a global hijacking mechanism for SS18-SSX on chromatin, and define the distinct contributions of two concurrent BAF complex perturbations.

Funding information:
  • NIAID NIH HHS - R01 AI076479(United States)

R-Ras1 and R-Ras2 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Survival for Correct Myelination in the Central Nervous System.

  • Sanz-Rodriguez M
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 May 30

Literature context:


Abstract:

Rapid and effective neural transmission of information requires correct axonal myelination. Modifications in myelination alter axonal capacity to transmit electric impulses and enable pathological conditions. In the CNS, oligodendrocytes (OLs) myelinate axons, a complex process involving various cellular interactions. However, we know little about the mechanisms that orchestrate correct myelination. Here, we demonstrate that OLs express R-Ras1 and R-Ras2. Using female and male mutant mice to delete these proteins, we found that activation of the PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2-MAPK pathways was weaker in mice lacking one or both of these GTPases, suggesting that both proteins coordinate the activity of these two pathways. Loss of R-Ras1 and/or R-Ras2 diminishes the number of OLs in major myelinated CNS tracts and increases the proportion of immature OLs. In R-Ras1-/- and R-Ras2-/--null mice, OLs show aberrant morphologies and fail to differentiate correctly into myelin-forming phenotypes. The smaller OL population and abnormal OL maturation induce severe hypomyelination, with shorter nodes of Ranvier in R-Ras1-/- and/or R-Ras2-/- mice. These defects explain the slower conduction velocity of myelinated axons that we observed in the absence of R-Ras1 and R-Ras2. Together, these results suggest that R-Ras1 and R-Ras2 are upstream elements that regulate the survival and differentiation of progenitors into OLs through the PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2-MAPK pathways for proper myelination.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we show that R-Ras1 and R-Ras2 play essential roles in regulating myelination in vivo and control fundamental aspects of oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and differentiation through synergistic activation of PI3K/Akt and Erk1/2-MAPK signaling. Mice lacking R-Ras1 and/or R-Ras2 show a diminished OL population with a higher proportion of immature OLs, explaining the observed hypomyelination in main CNS tracts. In vivo electrophysiology recordings demonstrate a slower conduction velocity of nerve impulses in the absence of R-Ras1 and R-Ras2. Therefore, R-Ras1 and R-Ras2 are essential for proper axonal myelination and accurate neural transmission.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - ZIA BC011010-06(United States)

Drosophila Full-Length Amyloid Precursor Protein Is Required for Visual Working Memory and Prevents Age-Related Memory Impairment.

  • Rieche F
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2018 Mar 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, its normal physiological functions are still unclear. APP is cleaved by various secretases whereby sequential processing by the β- and γ-secretases produces the β-amyloid peptide that is accumulating in plaques that typify AD. In addition, this produces secreted N-terminal sAPPβ fragments and the APP intracellular domain (AICD). Alternative cleavage by α-secretase results in slightly longer secreted sAPPα fragments and the identical AICD. Whereas the AICD has been connected with transcriptional regulation, sAPPα fragments have been suggested to have a neurotrophic and neuroprotective role [1]. Moreover, expression of sAPPα in APP-deficient mice could rescue their deficits in learning, spatial memory, and long-term potentiation [2]. Loss of the Drosophila APP-like (APPL) protein impairs associative olfactory memory formation and middle-term memory that can be rescued with a secreted APPL fragment [3]. We now show that APPL is also essential for visual working memory. Interestingly, this short-term memory declines rapidly with age, and this is accompanied by enhanced processing of APPL in aged flies. Furthermore, reducing secretase-mediated proteolytic processing of APPL can prevent the age-related memory loss, whereas overexpression of the secretases aggravates the aging effect. Rescue experiments confirmed that this memory requires signaling of full-length APPL and that APPL negatively regulates the neuronal-adhesion molecule Fasciclin 2. Overexpression of APPL or one of its secreted N termini results in a dominant-negative interaction with the FASII receptor. Therefore, our results show that specific memory processes require distinct APPL products.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - Z01 BC010313(United States)
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG045830()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R21 AG055943()
  • NIH HHS - P40 OD018537()

Interactome Screening Identifies the ER Luminal Chaperone Hsp47 as a Regulator of the Unfolded Protein Response Transducer IRE1α.

  • Sepulveda D
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2018 Jan 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis is controlled by a dynamic signaling network known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). IRE1α is a major UPR transducer, determining cell fate under ER stress. We used an interactome screening to unveil several regulators of the UPR, highlighting the ER chaperone Hsp47 as the major hit. Cellular and biochemical analysis indicated that Hsp47 instigates IRE1α signaling through a physical interaction. Hsp47 directly binds to the ER luminal domain of IRE1α with high affinity, displacing the negative regulator BiP from the complex to facilitate IRE1α oligomerization. The regulation of IRE1α signaling by Hsp47 is evolutionarily conserved as validated using fly and mouse models of ER stress. Hsp47 deficiency sensitized cells and animals to experimental ER stress, revealing the significance of Hsp47 to global proteostasis maintenance. We conclude that Hsp47 adjusts IRE1α signaling by fine-tuning the threshold to engage an adaptive UPR.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - (United States)

ALK2/ALK3-BMPR2/ACVR2A Mediate BMP2-Induced Downregulation of Pentraxin 3 Expression in Human Granulosa-Lutein Cells.

  • Bai L
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Oct 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and plays a critical role in regulating ovarian follicle function. Currently, the role of BMP2 during cumulus expansion remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of BMP2 on the regulation of pentraxin 3 (PTX3) expression (the major component of cumulus expansion) and the underlying mechanisms in human granulosa-lutein (hGL) cells. Both primary and immortalized hGL cells were used as research models. Our results showed that treatment with BMP2 significantly suppressed the basal and luteinizing hormone-induced upregulation of PTX3. In addition, BMP2 stimulated the phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8, and this effect was abolished by the addition of BMP type I receptor inhibitors, dorsomorphin homolog 1, and dorsomorphin but not SB431542. Moreover, the knockdown of activin receptorlike kinase 2/3 or BMP receptor type II/activin receptor type IIB receptors completely reversed the BMP2-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 and restored PTX3 expression. Similarly, the knockdown of SMAD4 completely reversed the suppressive effect of BMP2 on the expression of PTX3. These results improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of BMP2 signaling. Our findings suggest that BMP2 may be involved in the regulation of cumulus expansion during the periovulatory stage.

Coordinated Splicing of Regulatory Detained Introns within Oncogenic Transcripts Creates an Exploitable Vulnerability in Malignant Glioma.

  • Braun CJ
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2017 Oct 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glioblastoma (GBM) is a devastating malignancy with few therapeutic options. We identify PRMT5 in an in vivo GBM shRNA screen and show that PRMT5 knockdown or inhibition potently suppresses in vivo GBM tumors, including patient-derived xenografts. Pathway analysis implicates splicing in cellular PRMT5 dependency, and we identify a biomarker that predicts sensitivity to PRMT5 inhibition. We find that PRMT5 deficiency primarily disrupts the removal of detained introns (DIs). This impaired DI splicing affects proliferation genes, whose downregulation coincides with cell cycle defects, senescence and/or apoptosis. We further show that DI programs are evolutionarily conserved and operate during neurogenesis, suggesting that they represent a physiological regulatory mechanism. Collectively, these findings reveal a PRMT5-regulated DI-splicing program as an exploitable cancer vulnerability.

Lithium Chloride Increases COX-2 Expression and PGE2 Production in a Human Granulosa-Lutein SVOG Cell Line Via a GSK-3β/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway.

  • Bai L
  • Endocrinology
  • 2017 Sep 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Lithium chloride (LiCl) is widely prescribed for the treatment of bipolar disorders and is associated with a higher incidence of reproductive adverse effects. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and its derivative, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), play regulatory roles in the human ovulatory process. Whether LiCl affects ovulation by regulating COX2 expression and PGE2 production in the human ovary is still largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LiCl on the expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2 in human granulosa-lutein (hGL) cells, as well as the mechanisms underlying this effect. Both immortalized and primary hGL cells were used as research models. Using dual inhibition approaches, our results show that LiCl initiates the hGL cellular action by inhibiting the activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3β [GSK-3β (phosphorylation of GSK-3β)] and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not by affecting protein kinase B or cAMP response element binding protein signaling. Additionally, the phosphorylation of GSK-3β, but not ERK1/2, resulted in the stabilization and nuclear localization of β-catenin. Furthermore, knockdown of either β-catenin or GSK-3β reversed the LiCl-induced upregulation of COX-2 expression. These results indicate that LiCl upregulates the expression of COX-2 and the subsequent production of PGE2 through the canonical GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway in hGL cells.

Funding information:
  • NHGRI NIH HHS - R01 HG005085-02(United States)
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - R01 ES023316(United States)

Migrating Interneurons Secrete Fractalkine to Promote Oligodendrocyte Formation in the Developing Mammalian Brain.

  • Voronova A
  • Neuron
  • 2017 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

During development, newborn interneurons migrate throughout the embryonic brain. Here, we provide evidence that these interneurons act in a paracrine fashion to regulate developmental oligodendrocyte formation. Specifically, we show that medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) interneurons secrete factors that promote genesis of oligodendrocytes from glially biased cortical precursors in culture. Moreover, when MGE interneurons are genetically ablated in vivo prior to their migration, this causes a deficit in cortical oligodendrogenesis. Modeling of the interneuron-precursor paracrine interaction using transcriptome data identifies the cytokine fractalkine as responsible for the pro-oligodendrocyte effect in culture. This paracrine interaction is important in vivo, since knockdown of the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 in embryonic cortical precursors, or constitutive knockout of CX3CR1, causes decreased numbers of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and oligodendrocytes in the postnatal cortex. Thus, in addition to their role in regulating neuronal excitability, interneurons act in a paracrine fashion to promote the developmental genesis of oligodendrocytes.

IRBIT controls apoptosis by interacting with the Bcl-2 homolog, Bcl2l10, and by promoting ER-mitochondria contact.

  • Bonneau B
  • Elife
  • 2016 Dec 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

IRBIT is a molecule that interacts with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-binding pocket of the IP3 receptor (IP3R), whereas the antiapoptotic protein, Bcl2l10, binds to another part of the IP3-binding domain. Here we show that Bcl2l10 and IRBIT interact and exert an additive inhibition of IP3R in the physiological state. Moreover, we found that these proteins associate in a complex in mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) and that their interplay is involved in apoptosis regulation. MAMs are a hotspot for Ca2+ transfer between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, and massive Ca2+ release through IP3R in mitochondria induces cell death. We found that upon apoptotic stress, IRBIT is dephosphorylated, becoming an inhibitor of Bcl2l10. Moreover, IRBIT promotes ER mitochondria contact. Our results suggest that by inhibiting Bcl2l10 activity and promoting contact between ER and mitochondria, IRBIT facilitates massive Ca2+ transfer to mitochondria and promotes apoptosis. This work then describes IRBIT as a new regulator of cell death.

Funding information:
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute - R01 NS036715(United States)
  • NCATS NIH HHS - UL1 TR001105(United States)

Cerebral ischemic post‑conditioning induces autophagy inhibition and a HMGB1 secretion attenuation feedback loop to protect against ischemia reperfusion injury in an oxygen glucose deprivation cellular model.

  • Wang J
  • Mol Med Rep
  • 2016 Nov 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cerebral ischemic postconditioning (IPOC) has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. The present study aimed to determine whether IPOC could inhibit autophagy and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) release in a PC12 cell oxygen glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) model. An 8 h OGD and 24 h reperfusion cellular model was developed to mimic cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury, with 3 cycles of 10 min OGD/5 min reperfusion treatment to imitate IPOC. Cell viability was determined to demonstrate the efficiency of OGD/R, IPOC and autophagy activator, rapamycin (RAP), treatment. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to observe the formation of autophagosomes, and immunofluorescence, western blot and co‑immunoprecipitation were used to examine the expression of autophagy‑associated proteins and HMGB1. Enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay analysis was conducted to examine the level of HMGB1 in cell supernatants. Additionally, PC12 cells were treated with RAP to examine the effect of autophagy on HMGB1 release, and the effect of recombinant human HMGB1 and Beclin1 small interfering RNA on autophagy was investigated. The present study confirmed that IPOC inhibited autophagy and HMGB1 secretion, autophagy inhibition induced a decrease in HMGB1 secretion, and HMGB1 secretion attenuation caused autophagy inhibition in return, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blot analyses. Autophagy inhibition and HMGB1 secretion attenuation were, therefore, demonstrated to form a feedback loop under IPOC. These mechanisms illustrated the protective effects of IPOC and may accelerate the clinical use of IPOC.

Funding information:
  • European Research Council - 281699(International)

Chemical Hybridization of Glucagon and Thyroid Hormone Optimizes Therapeutic Impact for Metabolic Disease.

  • Finan B
  • Cell
  • 2016 Oct 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Glucagon and thyroid hormone (T3) exhibit therapeutic potential for metabolic disease but also exhibit undesired effects. We achieved synergistic effects of these two hormones and mitigation of their adverse effects by engineering chemical conjugates enabling delivery of both activities within one precisely targeted molecule. Coordinated glucagon and T3 actions synergize to correct hyperlipidemia, steatohepatitis, atherosclerosis, glucose intolerance, and obesity in metabolically compromised mice. We demonstrate that each hormonal constituent mutually enriches cellular processes in hepatocytes and adipocytes via enhanced hepatic cholesterol metabolism and white fat browning. Synchronized signaling driven by glucagon and T3 reciprocally minimizes the inherent harmful effects of each hormone. Liver-directed T3 action offsets the diabetogenic liability of glucagon, and glucagon-mediated delivery spares the cardiovascular system from adverse T3 action. Our findings support the therapeutic utility of integrating these hormones into a single molecular entity that offers unique potential for treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis.

  • Vernia S
  • Elife
  • 2016 Sep 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia.

Suppression of ischemia in arterial occlusive disease by JNK-promoted native collateral artery development.

  • Ramo K
  • Elife
  • 2016 Aug 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Arterial occlusive diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Blood flow to the affected tissue must be restored quickly if viability and function are to be preserved. We report that disruption of the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK) - cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway in endothelial cells causes severe blockade of blood flow and failure to recover in the murine femoral artery ligation model of hindlimb ischemia. We show that the MLK-JNK pathway is required for the formation of native collateral arteries that can restore circulation following arterial occlusion. Disruption of the MLK-JNK pathway causes decreased Dll4/Notch signaling, excessive sprouting angiogenesis, and defects in developmental vascular morphogenesis. Our analysis demonstrates that the MLK-JNK signaling pathway is a key regulatory mechanism that protects against ischemia in arterial occlusive disease.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - K01 MH109747(United States)

LRP8-Reelin-Regulated Neuronal Enhancer Signature Underlying Learning and Memory Formation.

  • Telese F
  • Neuron
  • 2015 May 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

One of the exceptional properties of the brain is its ability to acquire new knowledge through learning and to store that information through memory. The epigenetic mechanisms linking changes in neuronal transcriptional programs to behavioral plasticity remain largely unknown. Here, we identify the epigenetic signature of the neuronal enhancers required for transcriptional regulation of synaptic plasticity genes during memory formation, linking this to Reelin signaling. The binding of Reelin to its receptor, LRP8, triggers activation of this cohort of LRP8-Reelin-regulated neuronal (LRN) enhancers that serve as the ultimate convergence point of a novel synapse-to-nucleus pathway. Reelin simultaneously regulates NMDA-receptor transmission, which reciprocally permits the required γ-secretase-dependent cleavage of LRP8, revealing an unprecedented role for its intracellular domain in the regulation of synaptically generated signals. These results uncover an in vivo enhancer code serving as a critical molecular component of cognition and relevant to psychiatric disorders linked to defects in Reelin signaling.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM008471(United States)

Circulating PGRN is significantly associated with systemic insulin sensitivity and autophagic activity in metabolic syndrome.

  • Li H
  • Endocrinology
  • 2014 Sep 25

Literature context:


Abstract:

Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted protein that has recently emerged as an important regulatory adipokine of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. We report here that serum PGRN concentrations were significantly higher in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) than in subjects without MS and correlated positively with body mass index, waist circumference, fasting insulin, fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c, triglyceride, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and were inversely related to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and homeostasis model assessment of β cell function. Subgroup analysis in 32 subjects showed that elevated expression levels of PGRN were positively correlated with increased autophagy markers LC3 and Atg7 proteins in omental adipose tissue of subjects with MS. Consistent with these findings, the enhanced PGRN levels were also observed in multiple insulin-resistant cellular models, whereas PGRN-deficient adipocytes were more susceptible to insulin action and refractory to tunicamycin-induced autophagic disorders. PGRN remarkably attenuated insulin sensitivity, increased autophagic activity, and triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in cultured human adipocytes, whereas these effects were nullified by reduction of ER stress with phenylbutyric acid chemical chaperone treatment. In addition, PGRN-induced ER stress and impaired insulin sensitivity were improved in TNFR1(-/-) cells, indicating a causative role of TNF receptor in the action of PGRN. Collectively, our findings suggest that circulating PGRN is significantly associated with systemic insulin sensitivity and autophagic activity in adipose tissue and support the notion that PGRN functions as a potential link between chronic inflammation and insulin resistance.

Funding information:
  • NIAMS NIH HHS - R01 AR057759(United States)