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Peroxidase-AffiniPure Goat Anti-Mouse IgG (H + L) antibody

RRID:AB_10015289

Epigenetic Promoter DNA Methylation of miR-124 Promotes HIV-1 Tat-Mediated Microglial Activation via MECP2-STAT3 Axis.

  • Periyasamy P
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2018 Jun 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

The present study demonstrates HIV-1 Tat-mediated epigenetic downregulation of microglial miR-124 and its association with microglial activation. Exposure of mouse primary microglia isolated from newborn pups of either sex to HIV-1 Tat resulted in decreased expression of primary miR-124-1, primary miR-124-2 as well as the mature miR-124. In parallel, HIV-1 Tat exposure to mouse primary microglial cells resulted in increased expression of DNA methylation enzymes, such as DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B, which were also accompanied by increased global DNA methylation. Bisulfite-converted genomic DNA sequencing in the HIV-1 Tat-exposed mouse primary microglial cells further confirmed increased DNA methylation of the primary miR-124-1 and primary miR-124-2 promoters. Bioinformatic analyses identified MECP2 as a novel 3'-UTR target of miR-124. This was further validated in mouse primary microglial cells wherein HIV-1 Tat-mediated downregulation of miR-124 resulted in increased expression of MECP2, leading in turn to further repression of miR-124 via the feedback loop. In addition to MECP2, miR-124 also modulated the levels of STAT3 through its binding to the 3'-UTR, leading to microglial activation. Luciferase assays and Ago2 immunoprecipitation determined the direct binding between miR-124 and 3'-UTR of both MECP2 and STAT3. Gene silencing of MECP2 and DNMT1 and overexpression of miR-124 blocked HIV-1 Tat-mediated downregulation of miR-124 and microglial activation. In vitro findings were also confirmed in the basal ganglia of SIV-infected rhesus macaques (both sexes). In summary, our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism of HIV-1 Tat-mediated activation of microglia via downregulation of miR-124, leading ultimately to increased MECP2 and STAT3 signaling.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy in controlling viremia, the CNS continues to harbor viral reservoirs. The persistence of low-level virus replication leads to the accumulation of early viral proteins, including HIV-1 Tat protein. Understanding the epigenetic/molecular mechanism(s) by which viral proteins, such as HIV-1 Tat, can activate microglia is thus of paramount importance. This study demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat-mediated DNA methylation of the miR-124 promoter leads to its downregulation with a concomitant upregulation of the MECP2-STAT3-IL6, resulting in microglial activation. These findings reveal an unexplored epigenetic/molecular mechanism(s) underlying HIV-1 Tat-mediated microglial activation, thereby providing a potential target for the development of therapeutics aimed at ameliorating microglial activation and neuroinflammation in the context of HIV-1 infection.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - (Canada)

Peripheral Neuropathy and Hindlimb Paralysis in a Mouse Model of Adipocyte-Specific Knockout of Lkb1.

  • Xiong Y
  • EBioMedicine
  • 2018 Jun 18

Literature context:


Abstract:

Brown adipose tissues (BAT) burn lipids to generate heat through uncoupled respiration, thus representing a powerful target to counteract lipid accumulation and obesity. The tumor suppressor liver kinase b1 (Lkb1) is a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism; and adipocyte-specific knockout of Lkb1 (Ad-Lkb1 KO) leads to the expansion of BAT, improvements in systemic metabolism and resistance to obesity in young mice. Here we report the unexpected finding that the Ad-Lkb1 KO mice develop hindlimb paralysis at mid-age. Gene expression analyses indicate that Lkb1 KO upregulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines in interscapular BAT and epineurial brown adipocytes surrounding the sciatic nerve. This is followed by peripheral neuropathy characterized by infiltration of macrophages into the sciatic nerve, axon degeneration, reduced nerve conductance, and hindlimb paralysis. Mechanistically, Lkb1 KO reduces AMPK phosphorylation and amplifies mammalian target-of-rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent inflammatory signaling specifically in BAT but not WAT. Importantly, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of mTOR ameliorates inflammation and prevents paralysis. These results demonstrate that BAT inflammation is linked to peripheral neuropathy.

The Bicarbonate Transporter SLC4A7 Plays a Key Role in Macrophage Phagosome Acidification.

  • Sedlyarov V
  • Cell Host Microbe
  • 2018 Jun 13

Literature context:


Abstract:

Macrophages represent the first line of immune defense against pathogens, and phagosome acidification is a necessary step in pathogen clearance. Here, we identified the bicarbonate transporter SLC4A7, which is strongly induced upon macrophage differentiation, as critical for phagosome acidification. Loss of SLC4A7 reduced acidification of phagocytosed beads or bacteria and impaired the intracellular microbicidal capacity in human macrophage cell lines. The phenotype was rescued by wild-type SLC4A7, but not by SLC4A7 mutants, affecting transport capacity or cell surface localization. Loss of SLC4A7 resulted in increased cytoplasmic acidification during phagocytosis, suggesting that SLC4A7-mediated, bicarbonate-driven maintenance of cytoplasmic pH is necessary for phagosome acidification. Altogether, we identify SLC4A7 and bicarbonate-driven cytoplasmic pH homeostasis as an important element of phagocytosis and the associated microbicidal functions in macrophages.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG012689(United States)

A homozygous loss-of-function CAMK2A mutation causes growth delay, frequent seizures and severe intellectual disability.

  • Chia PH
  • Elife
  • 2018 May 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMK2) plays fundamental roles in synaptic plasticity that underlies learning and memory. Here, we describe a new recessive neurodevelopmental syndrome with global developmental delay, seizures and intellectual disability. Using linkage analysis and exome sequencing, we found that this disease maps to chromosome 5q31.1-q34 and is caused by a biallelic germline mutation in CAMK2A. The missense mutation, p.His477Tyr is located in the CAMK2A association domain that is critical for its function and localization. Biochemically, the p.His477Tyr mutant is defective in self-oligomerization and unable to assemble into the multimeric holoenzyme.In vivo, CAMK2AH477Y failed to rescue neuronal defects in C. elegans lacking unc-43, the ortholog of human CAMK2A. In vitro, neurons derived from patient iPSCs displayed profound synaptic defects. Together, our data demonstrate that a recessive germline mutation in CAMK2A leads to neurodevelopmental defects in humans and suggest that dysfunctional CAMK2 paralogs may contribute to other neurological disorders.

Funding information:
  • Agency for Science, Technology and Research - GODAFIT Strategic Positioning Fund()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - GM080399(United States)

Angiogenin/Ribonuclease 5 Is an EGFR Ligand and a Serum Biomarker for Erlotinib Sensitivity in Pancreatic Cancer.

  • Wang YN
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2018 Apr 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase) is a secreted enzyme critical for host defense. We discover an intrinsic RNase function, serving as a ligand for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a member of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The closely related bovine RNase A and human RNase 5 (angiogenin [ANG]) can trigger oncogenic transformation independently of their catalytic activities via direct association with EGFR. Notably, high plasma ANG level in PDAC patients is positively associated with response to EGFR inhibitor erlotinib treatment. These results identify a role of ANG as a serum biomarker that may be used to stratify patients for EGFR-targeted therapies, and offer insights into the ligand-receptor relationship between RNase and RTK families.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA016672()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA211615()
  • NCI NIH HHS - T32 CA186892()
  • NCI NIH HHS - U01 CA201777()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM098294(United States)

The pro-apoptotic JNK scaffold POSH/SH3RF1 mediates CHMP2BIntron5-associated toxicity in animal models of frontotemporal dementia.

  • West RJH
  • Hum. Mol. Genet.
  • 2018 Apr 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is one of the most prevalent forms of early-onset dementia. However, the pathological mechanisms driving neuronal atrophy in FTD remain poorly understood. Here we identify a conserved role for the novel pro-apoptotic protein plenty of SH3s (POSH)/SH3 domain containing ring finger 1 in mediating neuropathology in Drosophila and mammalian models of charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2BIntron5) associated FTD. Aberrant, AKT dependent, accumulation of POSH was observed throughout the nervous system of both Drosophila and mice expressing CHMP2BIntron5. Knockdown of POSH was shown to be neuroprotective and sufficient to alleviate aberrant neuronal morphology, behavioral deficits and premature-lethality in Drosophila models, as well as dendritic collapse and cell death in CHMP2BIntron5expressing rat primary neurons. POSH knockdown also ameliorated elevated markers of Jun N-terminal kinase and apoptotic cascades in both Drosophila and mammalian models. This study provides the first characterization of POSH as a potential component of an FTD neuropathology, identifying a novel apoptotic pathway with relevance to the FTD spectrum.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - CA096832(United States)

NMDA receptor blockade ameliorates abnormalities of spike firing of subthalamic nucleus neurons in a parkinsonian nonhuman primate.

  • Bhattacharya S
  • J. Neurosci. Res.
  • 2018 Mar 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ion channels comprising tetrameric assemblies of GluN1 and GluN2 receptor subunits that mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Of the four different GluN2 subunits, the GluN2D subunit-containing NMDARs have been suggested as a target for antiparkinsonian therapy because of their expression pattern in some of the basal ganglia nuclei that show abnormal firing patterns in the parkinsonian state, specifically the subthalamic nucleus (STN). In this study, we demonstrate that blockade of NMDARs altered spike firing in the STN in a male nonhuman primate that had been rendered parkinsonian by treatment with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. In accompanying experiments in male rodents, we found that GluN2D-NMDAR expression in the STN was reduced in acutely or chronically dopamine-depleted animals. Taken together, our data suggest that blockade of NMDARs in the STN may be a viable antiparkinsonian strategy, but that the ultimate success of this approach may be complicated by parkinsonism-associated changes in NMDAR expression in the STN.

Funding information:
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - T32 DE014320(United States)

Drosophila Full-Length Amyloid Precursor Protein Is Required for Visual Working Memory and Prevents Age-Related Memory Impairment.

  • Rieche F
  • Curr. Biol.
  • 2018 Mar 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, its normal physiological functions are still unclear. APP is cleaved by various secretases whereby sequential processing by the β- and γ-secretases produces the β-amyloid peptide that is accumulating in plaques that typify AD. In addition, this produces secreted N-terminal sAPPβ fragments and the APP intracellular domain (AICD). Alternative cleavage by α-secretase results in slightly longer secreted sAPPα fragments and the identical AICD. Whereas the AICD has been connected with transcriptional regulation, sAPPα fragments have been suggested to have a neurotrophic and neuroprotective role [1]. Moreover, expression of sAPPα in APP-deficient mice could rescue their deficits in learning, spatial memory, and long-term potentiation [2]. Loss of the Drosophila APP-like (APPL) protein impairs associative olfactory memory formation and middle-term memory that can be rescued with a secreted APPL fragment [3]. We now show that APPL is also essential for visual working memory. Interestingly, this short-term memory declines rapidly with age, and this is accompanied by enhanced processing of APPL in aged flies. Furthermore, reducing secretase-mediated proteolytic processing of APPL can prevent the age-related memory loss, whereas overexpression of the secretases aggravates the aging effect. Rescue experiments confirmed that this memory requires signaling of full-length APPL and that APPL negatively regulates the neuronal-adhesion molecule Fasciclin 2. Overexpression of APPL or one of its secreted N termini results in a dominant-negative interaction with the FASII receptor. Therefore, our results show that specific memory processes require distinct APPL products.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - Z01 BC010313(United States)
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG045830()
  • NIA NIH HHS - R21 AG055943()
  • NIH HHS - P40 OD018537()

The InR/Akt/TORC1 Growth-Promoting Signaling Negatively Regulates JAK/STAT Activity and Migratory Cell Fate during Morphogenesis.

  • Kang D
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2018 Feb 26

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cell growth and cell differentiation are two distinct yet coupled developmental processes, but how they are coordinated is not well understood. During Drosophila oogenesis, we found that the growth-promoting InR/Akt/TOR pathway was involved in suppressing the fate determination of the migratory border cells. The InR/Akt/TOR pathway signals through TOR and Raptor, components of TORC1, to downregulate the JAK/STAT pathway, which is necessary and sufficient for border cell fate determination. TORC1 promotes the protein stability of SOCS36E, the conserved negative regulator of JAK/STAT signaling, through physical interaction, suggesting that TORC1 acts as a key regulator coordinating both cell growth and cell differentiation.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - (Canada)

Age-Dependent Effects of apoE Reduction Using Antisense Oligonucleotides in a Model of β-amyloidosis.

  • Huynh TV
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Dec 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

The apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer disease. Previous studies suggest that reduction of apoE levels through genetic manipulation can reduce Aβ pathology. However, it is not clear how reduction of apoE levels after birth would affect amyloid deposition. We utilize an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to reduce apoE expression in the brains of APP/PS1-21 mice homozygous for the APOE-ε4 or APOE-ε3 allele. ASO treatment starting after birth led to a significant decrease in Aβ pathology when assessed at 4 months. Interestingly, ASO treatment starting at the onset of amyloid deposition led to an increase in Aβ plaque size and a reduction in plaque-associated neuritic dystrophy with no change in overall plaque load. These results suggest that lowering apoE levels prior to plaque deposition can strongly affect the initiation of Aβ pathology while lowering apoE after Aβ seeding modulates plaque size and toxicity.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - R01 AG047644()
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01GM105431(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007200()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS034467()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS090934()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R37 NS034467()

AQP2 can modulate the pattern of Ca2+ transients induced by store-operated Ca2+ entry under TRPV4 activation.

  • Pizzoni A
  • J. Cell. Biochem.
  • 2017 Dec 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

There is increasing evidence indicating that aquaporins (AQPs) exert an influence in cell signaling by the interplay with the TRPV4 Ca2+ channel. Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and plasma membrane hyperpolarization due to opening of Ca2+ -activated potassium channels (KCa) are events that have been proposed to take place downstream of TRPV4 activation. A major mechanism for Ca2+ entry, activated after depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores and driven by electrochemical forces, is the store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). The consequences of the interplay between TRPV4 and AQPs on SOCE have not been yet investigated. The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that AQP2 can modulate SOCE by facilitating the interaction of TRPV4 with KCa channels in renal cells. Using fluorescent probe techniques, we studied intracellular Ca2+ concentration and membrane potential in response to activation of TRPV4 in two rat cortical collecting duct cell lines (RCCD1 ), one not expressing AQPs (WT-RCCD1 ) and the other transfected with AQP2 (AQP2-RCCD1 ). We found that AQP2 co-immunoprecipitates with TRPV4 and with the small-conductance potassium channel (SK3). We also showed that AQP2 is crucial for the activation of SK3 by TRPV4, leading to hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane. This seems to be relevant to modulate the magnitude of SOCE and is accompanied by TRPV4 translocation to the plasma membrane only in AQP2 expressing cells. These findings open the perspective to further investigate whether the interplay between different AQPs with TRPV4 and KCa channels can be an important mechanism to modulate SOCE with physiological relevance.

Funding information:
  • NIDCR NIH HHS - R01 DE016572(United States)

Control of Cell Shape, Neurite Outgrowth, and Migration by a Nogo-A/HSPG Interaction.

  • Kempf A
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) critically modulate adhesion-, growth-, and migration-related processes. Here, we show that the transmembrane protein, Nogo-A, inhibits neurite outgrowth and cell spreading in neurons and Nogo-A-responsive cell lines via HSPGs. The extracellular, active 180 amino acid Nogo-A region, named Nogo-A-Δ20, binds to heparin and brain-derived heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) but not to the closely related chondroitin sulfate GAGs. HSPGs are required for Nogo-A-Δ20-induced inhibition of adhesion, cell spreading, and neurite outgrowth, as well as for RhoA activation. Surprisingly, we show that Nogo-A-Δ20 can act via HSPGs independently of its receptor, Sphingosine-1-Phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2). We thereby identify the HSPG family members syndecan-3 and syndecan-4 as functional receptors for Nogo-A-Δ20. Finally, we show in explant cultures ex vivo that Nogo-A-Δ20 promotes the migration of neuroblasts via HSPGs but not S1PR2.

YAP/TAZ and Hedgehog Coordinate Growth and Patterning in Gastrointestinal Mesenchyme.

  • Cotton JL
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Oct 9

Literature context:


Abstract:

YAP/TAZ are the major mediators of mammalian Hippo signaling; however, their precise function in the gastrointestinal tract remains poorly understood. Here we dissect the distinct roles of YAP/TAZ in endodermal epithelium and mesenchyme and find that, although dispensable for gastrointestinal epithelial development and homeostasis, YAP/TAZ function as the critical molecular switch to coordinate growth and patterning in gut mesenchyme. Our genetic analyses reveal that Lats1/2 kinases suppress expansion of the primitive mesenchymal progenitors, where YAP activation also prevents induction of the smooth muscle lineage through transcriptional repression of Myocardin. During later development, zone-restricted downregulation of YAP/TAZ provides the positional cue and allows smooth muscle cell differentiation induced by Hedgehog signaling. Taken together, our studies identify the mesenchymal requirement of YAP/TAZ in the gastrointestinal tract and highlight the functional interplays between Hippo and Hedgehog signaling underlying temporal and spatial control of tissue growth and specification in developing gut.

The Atypical MAP Kinase SWIP-13/ERK8 Regulates Dopamine Transporters through a Rho-Dependent Mechanism.

  • Bermingham DP
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Sep 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates multiple behaviors across phylogeny, with disrupted DA signaling in humans associated with addiction, attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. The DA transporter (DAT) imposes spatial and temporal limits on DA action, and provides for presynaptic DA recycling to replenish neurotransmitter pools. Molecular mechanisms that regulate DAT expression, trafficking, and function, particularly in vivo, remain poorly understood, though recent studies have implicated rho-linked pathways in psychostimulant action. To identify genes that dictate the ability of DAT to sustain normal levels of DA clearance, we pursued a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans based on the phenotype swimming-induced paralysis (Swip), a paralytic behavior observed in hermaphrodite worms with loss-of-function dat-1 mutations. Here, we report the identity of swip-13, which encodes a highly conserved ortholog of the human atypical MAP kinase ERK8. We present evidence that SWIP-13 acts presynaptically to insure adequate levels of surface DAT expression and DA clearance. Moreover, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a conserved pathway involving SWIP-13/ERK8 activation of Rho GTPases that dictates DAT surface expression and function.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Signaling by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is tightly regulated by the DA transporter (DAT), insuring efficient DA clearance after release. Molecular networks that regulate DAT are poorly understood, particularly in vivo Using a forward genetic screen in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we implicate the atypical mitogen activated protein kinase, SWIP-13, in DAT regulation. Moreover, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that SWIP-13, as well as its human counterpart ERK8, regulate DAT surface availability via the activation of Rho proteins. Our findings implicate a novel pathway that regulates DA synaptic availability and that may contribute to risk for disorders linked to perturbed DA signaling. Targeting this pathway may be of value in the development of therapeutics in such disorders.

Heterophilic Type II Cadherins Are Required for High-Magnitude Synaptic Potentiation in the Hippocampus.

  • Basu R
  • Neuron
  • 2017 Sep 27

Literature context:


Abstract:

Hippocampal CA3 neurons form synapses with CA1 neurons in two layers, stratum oriens (SO) and stratum radiatum (SR). Each layer develops unique synaptic properties but molecular mechanisms that mediate these differences are unknown. Here, we show that SO synapses normally have significantly more mushroom spines and higher-magnitude long-term potentiation (LTP) than SR synapses. Further, we discovered that these differences require the Type II classic cadherins, cadherins-6, -9, and -10. Though cadherins typically function via trans-cellular homophilic interactions, our results suggest presynaptic cadherin-9 binds postsynaptic cadherins-6 and -10 to regulate mushroom spine density and high-magnitude LTP in the SO layer. Loss of these cadherins has no effect on the lower-magnitude LTP typically observed in the SR layer, demonstrating that cadherins-6, -9, and -10 are gatekeepers for high-magnitude LTP. Thus, Type II cadherins may uniquely contribute to the specificity and strength of synaptic changes associated with learning and memory.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - R01 EY022073()

Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Lipid Bilayer Stress.

  • Halbleib K
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Aug 17

Literature context:


Abstract:

The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved homeostatic program that is activated by misfolded proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recently, it became evident that aberrant lipid compositions of the ER membrane, referred to as lipid bilayer stress, are equally potent in activating the UPR. The underlying molecular mechanism, however, remained unclear. We show that the most conserved transducer of ER stress, Ire1, uses an amphipathic helix (AH) to sense membrane aberrancies and control UPR activity. In vivo and in vitro experiments, together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, identify the physicochemical properties of the membrane environment that control Ire1 oligomerization. This work establishes the molecular mechanism of UPR activation by lipid bilayer stress.

The DYT6 Dystonia Protein THAP1 Regulates Myelination within the Oligodendrocyte Lineage.

  • Yellajoshyula D
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Jul 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

The childhood-onset motor disorder DYT6 dystonia is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcription factor THAP1, but the neurodevelopmental processes in which THAP1 participates are unknown. We find that THAP1 is essential for the timing of myelination initiation during CNS maturation. Conditional deletion of THAP1 in the CNS retards maturation of the oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage, delaying myelination and causing persistent motor deficits. The CNS myelination defect results from a cell-autonomous requirement for THAP1 in the OL lineage and is recapitulated in developmental assays performed on OL progenitor cells purified from Thap1 null mice. Loss of THAP1 function disrupts a core set of OL maturation genes and reduces the DNA occupancy of YY1, a transcription factor required for OL maturation. These studies establish a role for THAP1 transcriptional regulation at the inception of myelination and implicate abnormal timing of myelination in the pathogenesis of childhood-onset dystonia.

Validation of commercial ERK antibodies against the ERK orthologue of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata.

  • Courtial L
  • F1000Res
  • 2017 Jul 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signalling pathway controls key cellular processes, such as cell cycle regulation, cell fate determination and the response to external stressors. Although ERK functions are well studied in a variety of living organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, its functions in corals are still poorly known. The present work aims to give practical tools to study the expression level of ERK protein and the activity of the ERK signalling pathway in corals. The antibody characterisation experiment was performed five times and identical results were obtained. The present study validated the immune-reactivity of commercially available antibodies directed against ERK and its phosphorylated/activated forms on protein extracts of the reef-building coral Stylophora pistillata.

Kupffer Cell-Derived Tnf Triggers Cholangiocellular Tumorigenesis through JNK due to Chronic Mitochondrial Dysfunction and ROS.

  • Yuan D
  • Cancer Cell
  • 2017 Jun 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a highly malignant, heterogeneous cancer with poor treatment options. We found that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress trigger a niche favoring cholangiocellular overgrowth and tumorigenesis. Liver damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and paracrine tumor necrosis factor (Tnf) from Kupffer cells caused JNK-mediated cholangiocellular proliferation and oncogenic transformation. Anti-oxidant treatment, Kupffer cell depletion, Tnfr1 deletion, or JNK inhibition reduced cholangiocellular pre-neoplastic lesions. Liver-specific JNK1/2 deletion led to tumor reduction and enhanced survival in Akt/Notch- or p53/Kras-induced ICC models. In human ICC, high Tnf expression near ICC lesions, cholangiocellular JNK-phosphorylation, and ROS accumulation in surrounding hepatocytes are present. Thus, Kupffer cell-derived Tnf favors cholangiocellular proliferation/differentiation and carcinogenesis. Targeting the ROS/Tnf/JNK axis may provide opportunities for ICC therapy.

Funding information:
  • NIDDK NIH HHS - R01 DK107220()

Structural Basis of Egg Coat-Sperm Recognition at Fertilization.

  • Raj I
  • Cell
  • 2017 Jun 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Recognition between sperm and the egg surface marks the beginning of life in all sexually reproducing organisms. This fundamental biological event depends on the species-specific interaction between rapidly evolving counterpart molecules on the gametes. We report biochemical, crystallographic, and mutational studies of domain repeats 1-3 of invertebrate egg coat protein VERL and their interaction with cognate sperm protein lysin. VERL repeats fold like the functionally essential N-terminal repeat of mammalian sperm receptor ZP2, whose structure is also described here. Whereas sequence-divergent repeat 1 does not bind lysin, repeat 3 binds it non-species specifically via a high-affinity, largely hydrophobic interface. Due to its intermediate binding affinity, repeat 2 selectively interacts with lysin from the same species. Exposure of a highly positively charged surface of VERL-bound lysin suggests that complex formation both disrupts the organization of egg coat filaments and triggers their electrostatic repulsion, thereby opening a hole for sperm penetration and fusion.

Funding information:
  • European Research Council - 260759()

Llgl1 Connects Cell Polarity with Cell-Cell Adhesion in Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

  • Jossin Y
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 Jun 5

Literature context:


Abstract:

Malformations of the cerebral cortex (MCCs) are devastating developmental disorders. We report here that mice with embryonic neural stem-cell-specific deletion of Llgl1 (Nestin-Cre/Llgl1fl/fl), a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila cell polarity gene lgl, exhibit MCCs resembling severe periventricular heterotopia (PH). Immunohistochemical analyses and live cortical imaging of PH formation revealed that disruption of apical junctional complexes (AJCs) was responsible for PH in Nestin-Cre/Llgl1fl/fl brains. While it is well known that cell polarity proteins govern the formation of AJCs, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. We show that LLGL1 directly binds to and promotes internalization of N-cadherin, and N-cadherin/LLGL1 interaction is inhibited by atypical protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of LLGL1, restricting the accumulation of AJCs to the basolateral-apical boundary. Disruption of the N-cadherin-LLGL1 interaction during cortical development in vivo is sufficient for PH. These findings reveal a mechanism responsible for the physical and functional connection between cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion machineries in mammalian cells.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA131047()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA179914()
  • NICHD NIH HHS - T32 HD007183()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS080194()

RhoD Inhibits RhoC-ROCK-Dependent Cell Contraction via PAK6.

  • Durkin CH
  • Dev. Cell
  • 2017 May 8

Literature context:


Abstract:

RhoA-mediated regulation of myosin-II activity in the actin cortex controls the ability of cells to contract and bleb during a variety of cellular processes, including cell migration and division. Cell contraction and blebbing also frequently occur as part of the cytopathic effect seen during many different viral infections. We now demonstrate that the vaccinia virus protein F11, which localizes to the plasma membrane, is required for ROCK-mediated cell contraction from 2 hr post infection. Curiously, F11-induced cell contraction is dependent on RhoC and not RhoA signaling to ROCK. Moreover, RhoC-driven cell contraction depends on the upstream inhibition of RhoD signaling by F11. This inhibition prevents RhoD from regulating its downstream effector Pak6, alleviating the suppression of RhoC by the kinase. Our observations with vaccinia have now demonstrated that RhoD recruits Pak6 to the plasma membrane to antagonize RhoC signaling during cell contraction and blebbing.

Prion-Like Seeding of Misfolded α-Synuclein in the Brains of Dementia with Lewy Body Patients in RT-QUIC.

  • Sano K
  • Mol. Neurobiol.
  • 2017 May 28

Literature context:


Abstract:

The prion-like seeding of misfolded α-synuclein (αSyn) involved in the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases (LBD) remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Using the real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QUIC) seeding assay, we investigated whether brain tissues from cases of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), which contain serine 129 (Ser129)-phosphorylated insoluble aggregates of αSyn, can convert Escherichia coli-derived recombinant αSyn (r-αSyn) to fibrils. Diffuse neocortical DLB yielded 50% seeding dose (SD50) values of 107~1010/g brain. Limbic DLB was estimated to have an SD50 value of ~105/g brain. Furthermore, RT-QUIC assay discriminated DLB from other neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Unexpectedly, the prion-like seeding was reconstructed in reactions seeded with oligomer-like species, but not with insoluble aggregates of r-αSyn, regardless of Ser129 phosphorylation status. Our findings suggest that RT-QUIC using r-αSyn can be applied to detect seeding activity in LBD, and the culprit that causes prion-like seeding may be oligomeric forms of αSyn.

TCF7L1 promotes skin tumorigenesis independently of β-catenin through induction of LCN2.

  • Ku AT
  • Elife
  • 2017 May 3

Literature context:


Abstract:

The transcription factor TCF7L1 is an embryonic stem cell signature gene that is upregulated in multiple aggressive cancer types, but its role in skin tumorigenesis has not yet been defined. Here we document TCF7L1 upregulation in skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and demonstrate that TCF7L1 overexpression increases tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity, and malignant progression in the chemically induced mouse model of skin SCC. Additionally, we show that downregulation of TCF7L1 and its paralogue TCF7L2 reduces tumor growth in a xenograft model of human skin SCC. Using separation-of-function mutants, we show that TCF7L1 promotes tumor growth, enhances cell migration, and overrides oncogenic RAS-induced senescence independently of its interaction with β-catenin. Through transcriptome profiling and combined gain- and loss-of-function studies, we identified LCN2 as a major downstream effector of TCF7L1 that drives tumor growth. Our findings establish a tumor-promoting role for TCF7L1 in skin and elucidate the mechanisms underlying its tumorigenic capacity.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA016672()
  • NCI NIH HHS - P30 CA125123()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA194062()
  • NCI NIH HHS - R01 CA194617()
  • NCRR NIH HHS - S10 RR024574()
  • NHLBI NIH HHS - T32 HL092332()
  • NIAID NIH HHS - P30 AI036211()
  • NIDCD NIH HHS - R01 DC00189.(United States)
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM088129()

The Ubiquitin Ligase CHIP Integrates Proteostasis and Aging by Regulation of Insulin Receptor Turnover.

  • Tawo R
  • Cell
  • 2017 Apr 20

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Abstract:

Aging is attended by a progressive decline in protein homeostasis (proteostasis), aggravating the risk for protein aggregation diseases. To understand the coordination between proteome imbalance and longevity, we addressed the mechanistic role of the quality-control ubiquitin ligase CHIP, which is a key regulator of proteostasis. We observed that CHIP deficiency leads to increased levels of the insulin receptor (INSR) and reduced lifespan of worms and flies. The membrane-bound INSR regulates the insulin and IGF1 signaling (IIS) pathway and thereby defines metabolism and aging. INSR is a direct target of CHIP, which triggers receptor monoubiquitylation and endocytic-lysosomal turnover to promote longevity. However, upon proteotoxic stress conditions and during aging, CHIP is recruited toward disposal of misfolded proteins, reducing its capacity to degrade the INSR. Our study indicates a competitive relationship between proteostasis and longevity regulation through CHIP-assisted proteolysis, providing a mechanistic concept for understanding the impact of proteome imbalance on aging.

Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis along the Dorsoventral Axis Contributes Differentially to Environmental Enrichment Combined with Voluntary Exercise in Alleviating Chronic Inflammatory Pain in Mice.

  • Zheng J
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Apr 12

Literature context:


Abstract:

Cognitive behavioral therapy, such as environmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise (EE-VEx), is under active investigation as an adjunct to pharmaceutical treatment for chronic pain. However, the effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of EE-VEx remain unclear. In mice with intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, our results revealed that EE-VEx alleviated perceptual, affective, and cognitive dimensions of chronic inflammatory pain. These effects of EE-VEx on chronic pain were contingent on the occurrence of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in a functionally dissociated manner along the dorsoventral axis: neurogenesis in the ventral dentate gyrus participated in alleviating perceptual and affective components of chronic pain by EE-VEx, whereas neurogenesis in the dorsal dentate gyrus was involved in EE-VEx's cognitive-enhancing effects. Chronic inflammatory pain was accompanied by decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the dentate gyrus, which were reversed by EE-VEx. Overexpression of BDNF in the dentate gyrus mimicked the effects of EE-VEx. Our results demonstrate distinct contribution of adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the dorsoventral axis to EE-VEx's beneficial effects on different dimensions of chronic pain.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Environmental enrichment combined with voluntary exercise (EE-VEx) is under active investigation as an adjunct to pharmaceutical treatment for chronic pain, but its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In a mouse model of inflammatory pain, the present study demonstrates that the beneficial effects of EE-VEx on chronic pain depend on adult neurogenesis with a dorsoventral dissociation along the hippocampal axis. Adult neurogenesis in the ventral dentate gyrus participates in alleviating perceptual and affective components of chronic pain by EE-VEx, whereas that in the dorsal pole is involved in EE-VEx's cognitive-enhancing effects in chronic pain.

Ubiquitin Ligase RNF138 Promotes Episodic Ataxia Type 2-Associated Aberrant Degradation of Human Cav2.1 (P/Q-Type) Calcium Channels.

  • Fu SJ
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Voltage-gated CaV2.1 channels comprise a pore-forming α1A subunit with auxiliary α2δ and β subunits. CaV2.1 channels play an essential role in regulating synaptic signaling. Mutations in the human gene encoding the CaV2.1 subunit are associated with the cerebellar disease episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Several EA2-causing mutants exhibit impaired protein stability and exert dominant-negative suppression of CaV2.1 wild-type (WT) protein expression via aberrant proteasomal degradation. Here, we set out to delineate the protein degradation mechanism of human CaV2.1 subunit by identifying RNF138, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, as a novel CaV2.1-binding partner. In neurons, RNF138 and CaV2.1 coexist in the same protein complex and display notable subcellular colocalization at presynaptic and postsynaptic regions. Overexpression of RNF138 promotes polyubiquitination and accelerates protein turnover of CaV2.1. Disrupting endogenous RNF138 function with a mutant (RNF138-H36E) or shRNA infection significantly upregulates the CaV2.1 protein level and enhances CaV2.1 protein stability. Disrupting endogenous RNF138 function also effectively rescues the defective protein expression of EA2 mutants, as well as fully reversing EA2 mutant-induced excessive proteasomal degradation of CaV2.1 WT subunits. RNF138-H36E coexpression only partially restores the dominant-negative effect of EA2 mutants on CaV2.1 WT functional expression, which can be attributed to defective membrane trafficking of CaV2.1 WT in the presence of EA2 mutants. We propose that RNF138 plays a critical role in the homeostatic regulation of CaV2.1 protein level and functional expression and that RNF138 serves as the primary E3 ubiquitin ligase promoting EA2-associated aberrant degradation of human CaV2.1 subunits.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Loss-of-function mutations in the human CaV2.1 subunit are linked to episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), a dominantly inherited disease characterized by paroxysmal attacks of ataxia and nystagmus. EA2-causing mutants may exert dominant-negative effects on the CaV2.1 wild-type subunit via aberrant proteasomal degradation. The molecular nature of the CaV2.1 ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway is currently unknown. The present study reports the first identification of an E3 ubiquitin ligase for CaV2.1, RNF138. CaV2.1 protein stability is dynamically regulated by RNF138 and auxiliary α2δ and β subunits. We provide a proof of concept that protecting the human CaV2.1 subunit from excessive proteasomal degradation with specific interruption of endogenous RNF138 function may partially contribute to the future development of a novel therapeutic strategy for EA2 patients.

Initiation of Quality Control during Poly(A) Translation Requires Site-Specific Ribosome Ubiquitination.

  • Juszkiewicz S
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Feb 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

Diverse cellular stressors have been observed to trigger site-specific ubiquitination on several ribosomal proteins. However, the ubiquitin ligases, biochemical consequences, and physiologic pathways linked to these modifications are not known. Here, we show in mammalian cells that the ubiquitin ligase ZNF598 is required for ribosomes to terminally stall during translation of poly(A) sequences. ZNF598-mediated stalling initiated the ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) pathway for degradation of nascent truncated proteins. Biochemical ubiquitination reactions identified two sites of mono-ubiquitination on the 40S protein eS10 as the primary ribosomal target of ZNF598. Cells lacking ZNF598 activity or containing ubiquitination-resistant eS10 ribosomes failed to stall efficiently on poly(A) sequences. In the absence of stalling, read-through of poly(A) produces a poly-lysine tag, which might alter the localization and solubility of the associated protein. Thus, ribosome ubiquitination can modulate translation elongation and impacts co-translational quality control to minimize production of aberrant proteins.

Funding information:
  • Medical Research Council - MC_UP_A022_1007()

Calpain-Mediated Proteolysis of Talin and FAK Regulates Adhesion Dynamics Necessary for Axon Guidance.

  • Kerstein PC
  • J. Neurosci.
  • 2017 Feb 8

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Abstract:

Guidance of axons to their proper synaptic target sites requires spatially and temporally precise modulation of biochemical signals within growth cones. Ionic calcium (Ca2+) is an essential signal for axon guidance that mediates opposing effects on growth cone motility. The diverse effects of Ca2+ arise from the precise localization of Ca2+ signals into microdomains containing specific Ca2+ effectors. For example, differences in the mechanical and chemical composition of the underlying substrata elicit local Ca2+ signals within growth cone filopodia that regulate axon guidance through activation of the protease calpain. However, how calpain regulates growth cone motility remains unclear. Here, we identify the adhesion proteins talin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as proteolytic targets of calpain in Xenopus laevis spinal cord neurons both in vivo and in vitro Inhibition of calpain increases the localization of endogenous adhesion signaling to growth cone filopodia. Using live cell microscopy and specific calpain-resistant point-mutants of talin (L432G) and FAK (V744G), we find that calpain inhibits paxillin-based adhesion assembly through cleavage of talin and FAK, and adhesion disassembly through cleavage of FAK. Blocking calpain cleavage of talin and FAK inhibits repulsive turning from focal uncaging of Ca2+ within filopodia. In addition, blocking calpain cleavage of talin and FAK in vivo promotes Rohon-Beard peripheral axon extension into the skin. These data demonstrate that filopodial Ca2+ signals regulate axon outgrowth and guidance through calpain regulation of adhesion dynamics through specific cleavage of talin and FAK.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The proper formation of neuronal networks requires accurate guidance of axons and dendrites during development by motile structures known as growth cones. Understanding the intracellular signaling mechanisms that govern growth cone motility will clarify how the nervous system develops and regenerates, and may identify areas of therapeutic intervention in disease or injury. One important signal that controls growth cones is that of local Ca2+ transients, which control the rate and direction of axon outgrowth. We demonstrate here that Ca2+-dependent inhibition axon outgrowth and guidance is mediated by calpain proteolysis of the adhesion proteins talin and focal adhesion kinase. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into Ca2+/calpain regulation of growth cone motility and axon guidance during neuronal development.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - T32 GM007507()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - F31 NS074732()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R01 NS099405()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R21 NS088477()
  • NINDS NIH HHS - R56 NS041564()

Caspase-8 Acts in a Non-enzymatic Role as a Scaffold for Assembly of a Pro-inflammatory "FADDosome" Complex upon TRAIL Stimulation.

  • Henry CM
  • Mol. Cell
  • 2017 Feb 16

Literature context:


Abstract:

TRAIL is a potent inducer of apoptosis and has been studied almost exclusively in this context. However, TRAIL can also induce NFκB-dependent expression of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Surprisingly, whereas inhibition of caspase activity blocked TRAIL-induced apoptosis, but not cytokine production, knock down or deletion of caspase-8 suppressed both outcomes, suggesting that caspase-8 participates in TRAIL-induced inflammatory signaling in a scaffold role. Consistent with this, introduction of a catalytically inactive caspase-8 mutant into CASP-8 null cells restored TRAIL-induced cytokine production, but not cell death. Furthermore, affinity precipitation of the native TRAIL receptor complex revealed that pro-caspase-8 was required for recruitment of RIPK1, via FADD, to promote NFκB activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production downstream. Thus, caspase-8 can serve in two distinct roles in response to TRAIL receptor engagement, as a scaffold for assembly of a Caspase-8-FADD-RIPK1 "FADDosome" complex, leading to NFκB-dependent inflammation, or as a protease that promotes apoptosis.

Funding information:
  • Worldwide Cancer Research - 14-0323()

Epigenetic modifications during sex change repress gonadotropin stimulation of cyp19a1a in a teleost ricefield eel (Monopterus albus).

  • Zhang Y
  • Endocrinology
  • 2013 Aug 22

Literature context:


Abstract:

In vertebrates, cytochrome P450 aromatase, encoded by cyp19a1, converts androgens to estrogens and plays important roles in gonadal differentiation and development. The present study examines whether epigenetic mechanisms are involved in cyp19a1a expression and subsequent gonadal development in the hermaphroditic ricefield eel. The expression of the ricefield eel cyp19a1a was stimulated by gonadotropin via the cAMP pathway in the ovary but not the ovotestis or testis. The CpG within the cAMP response element (CRE) of the cyp19a1a promoter was hypermethylated in the ovotestis and testis compared with the ovary. The methylation levels of CpG sites around CRE in the distal region (region II) and around steroidogenic factor 1/adrenal 4 binding protein sites and TATA box in the proximal region (region I) were inversely correlated with cyp19a1a expression during the natural sex change from female to male. In vitro DNA methylation decreased the basal and forskolin-induced activities of cyp19a1a promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that histone 3 (Lys9) in both regions I and II of the cyp19a1a promoter were deacetylated and trimethylated in the testis, and in contrast to the ovary, phosphorylated CRE-binding protein failed to bind to these regions. Lastly, the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine reversed the natural sex change of ricefield eels. These results suggested that epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA methylation and histone deacetylation and methylation may abrogate the stimulation of cyp19a1a by gonadotropins in a male-specific fashion. This may be a mechanism widely used to drive natural sex change in teleosts as well as gonadal differentiation in other vertebrates.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - AG039669(United States)
  • NIEHS NIH HHS - U01 ES019480(United States)

Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the level of tyrosine hydroxylase protein in brain tissue from Parkinson's disease models.

  • Fauss D
  • J. Neurosci. Methods
  • 2013 May 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyses the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamines. TH expression is regulated in a tissue-specific manner during neuronal development and differentiation. Because of its key regulatory role in central and peripheral catecholamine synthesis, TH is associated with the pathogenesis of several neurological and psychiatric diseases, including Parkinson's disease, dystonia, schizophrenia, affective disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, developing a quantitative method to monitor the changes in TH expression in disease models could facilitate the identification and characterisation of neuromodulatory and neuroprotective therapeutic agents. The present report describes the generation and characterisation of a new set of monoclonal TH antibodies and the development of a novel sandwich ELISA for the quantitative detection of the TH protein in rodent brain tissue. This ELISA exhibits excellent reproducibility and good linearity in the analysis of complex brain tissue lysates. The cross-validation of the TH ELISA using semi-quantitative TH Western blot methods and HPLC measurement of dopamine levels suggests that the new TH ELISA is sufficiently sensitive to detect small-to-moderate region-specific differences, developmental changes, and Parkinson's disease-related changes in TH expression in rodent brains. This new TH ELISA also offers greater flexibility than conventional HPLC-based dopamine assays because the optimal tissue lysis buffer used for the detection of TH in brain tissue is also compatible with the analysis of other proteins associated with Parkinson's disease, such as α-synuclein, suggesting that this TH ELISA could be used in a multiplexed format.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - P50 MH-094268(United States)