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zpr-1, zpr1, FRet 43, Fret43 antibody

RRID:AB_10013803

Antibody ID

AB_10013803

Target Antigen

arr3a zebrafish

Proper Citation

(Zebrafish International Resource Center Cat# zpr-1, RRID:AB_10013803)

Clonality

monoclonal antibody

Comments

manufacturer recommendations: Immunohistochemistry; please note, this is an Abcam antibody sold under the catalog number 174435, now available at ZIRC.

Host Organism

mouse

Vendor

Zebrafish International Resource Center Go To Vendor

Connectivity of cone photoreceptor telodendria in the zebrafish retina.

  • Noel NCL
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2018 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The connectivity amongst photoreceptors is critical to their function, as it underpins lateral inhibition and effective translation of stimuli into neural signals. Despite much work characterizing second-order interneurons in the outer retina, the synapses directly connecting photoreceptors have often been overlooked. Telodendria are fine processes that connect photoreceptor pedicles. They have been observed in diverse vertebrate groups, yet their roles in vision remain speculative. Here, we visualize telodendria via fluorescent protein expression in photoreceptor subtypes. We characterized short wavelength cone telodendria in adult and larval zebrafish retina. Additionally, in the larval retina, we investigated rod telodendria and UV cone telodendria in mutant and transgenic retinas with altered complements of cone types. In the adult retina, telodendria are twice as abundant and branch almost twice as often on blue cones compared to UV cones. Pedicles of neighboring UV and blue cones typically converge into contiguous pairs, despite the regular spacing of their cell bodies. In contrast to adults, larval UV cone telodendria are more numerous (1.3 times) than blue cone telodendria. UV cone telodendria are not detectably affected by ablation of blue cones, and are reduced twofold in mutant larval retina with few UV cones. We thus saw no evidence that telodendria increase in number in the absence of their typical cellular neighbors. We also found that larval rod telodendria are less abundant than short wavelength cone telodendria. In summary, we describe the development and morphology of zebrafish photoreceptor synaptic connectivity toward appreciating the function of telodendria in visual signal processing.

Activating the regenerative potential of Müller glia cells in a regeneration-deficient retina.

  • Lust K
  • Elife
  • 2018 Jan 29

Literature context:


Abstract:

Regeneration responses in animals are widespread across phyla. To identify molecular players that confer regenerative capacities to non-regenerative species is of key relevance for basic research and translational approaches. Here, we report a differential response in retinal regeneration between medaka (Oryzias latipes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). In contrast to zebrafish, medaka Müller glia (olMG) cells behave like progenitors and exhibit a restricted capacity to regenerate the retina. After injury, olMG cells proliferate but fail to self-renew and ultimately only restore photoreceptors. In our injury paradigm, we observed that in contrast to zebrafish, proliferating olMG cells do not maintain sox2 expression. Sustained sox2 expression in olMG cells confers regenerative responses similar to those of zebrafish MG (drMG) cells. We show that a single, cell-autonomous factor reprograms olMG cells and establishes a regeneration-like mode. Our results position medaka as an attractive model to delineate key regeneration factors with translational potential.

Funding information:
  • NIMH NIH HHS - R01 MH073991(United States)

Impaired AMPA receptor trafficking by a double knockout of zebrafish olfactomedin1a/b.

  • Nakaya N
  • J. Neurochem.
  • 2017 Dec 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

The olfm1a and olfm1b genes in zebrafish encode conserved secreted glycoproteins. These genes are preferentially expressed in the brain and retina starting from 16 h post-fertilization until adulthood. Functions of the Olfm1 gene is still unclear. Here, we produced and analyzed a null zebrafish mutant of both olfm1a and olfm1b genes (olfm1 null). olfm1 null fish were born at a normal Mendelian ratio and showed normal body shape and fertility as well as no visible defects from larval stages to adult. Olfm1 proteins were preferentially localized in the synaptosomes of the adult brain. Olfm1 co-immunoprecipitated with GluR2 and soluble NSF attachment protein receptor complexes indicating participation of Olfm1 in both pre- and post-synaptic events. Phosphorylation of GluR2 was not changed while palmitoylation of GluR2 was decreased in the brain synaptosomal membrane fraction of olfm1 null compared with wt fish. The levels of GluR2, SNAP25, flotillin1, and VAMP2 were markedly reduced in the synaptic microdomain of olfm1 null brain compared with wt. The internalization of GluR2 in retinal cells and the localization of VAMP2 in brain synaptosome were modified by olfm1 null mutation. This indicates that Olfm1 may regulate receptor trafficking from the intracellular compartments to the synaptic membrane microdomain, partly through the alteration of post-translational GluR2 modifications such as palmitoylation. Olfm1 may be considered a novel regulator of the composition and function of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor complex.

Complexity of gap junctions between horizontal cells of the carp retina.

  • Greb H
  • Neuroscience
  • 2017 Jan 6

Literature context:


Abstract:

In the vertebrate retina, horizontal cells (HCs) reveal homologous coupling by gap junctions (gj), which are thought to consist of different connexins (Cx). However, recent studies in mouse, rabbit and zebrafish retina indicate that individual HCs express more than one connexin. To provide further insights into the composition of gj connecting HCs and to determine whether HCs express multiple connexins, we examined the molecular identity and distribution of gj between HCs of the carp retina. We have cloned four carp connexins designated Cx49.5, Cx55.5, Cx52.6 and Cx53.8 with a close relationship to connexins previously reported in HCs of mouse, rabbit and zebrafish, respectively. Using in situ hybridization, Cx49.5 expression was detected in different subpopulations of retinal neurons including HCs, whereas the Cx52.6 transcript was localized exclusively in HCs. Using specific antibodies, Cx55.5 and Cx53.8 were detected on dendrites of all four HC subtypes and axon terminals. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the presence of Cx55.5 and Cx53.8 in gap junctions between these processes and Cx55.5 was additionally observed in HC dendrites invaginating cone pedicles, suggesting its participation in the modulation of photoreceptor output in the carp retina. Furthermore, using single-cell RT-PCR, all four connexins were detected in different subtypes of HCs, suggesting overlapping expression patterns. Thus, the composition of gj mediating homologous coupling between subtypes of carp HCs appears to be more complex than expected. Moreover, BLAST searches of the preliminary carp genome, using novel sequences as query, suggest that most of the analyzed connexin genes are duplicated in carp.

Developmental pattern of the neuronal intermediate filament inaa in the zebrafish retina.

  • Liao ML
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2016 Dec 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

α-Internexin is a member of the neuronal intermediate filament (nIF) protein family, which also includes peripherin and neurofilament (NF) triplet proteins. Previous studies found that expression of α-internexin precedes that of the NF triplet proteins in mammals and suggested that α-internexin plays a key role in the neuronal cytoskeleton network during development. In this study, we aimed to analyze the expression patterns and function of internexin neuronal intermediate filament protein-alpha a (inaa), the encoding gene of which is a homolog of the mammalian α-internexin, during retinal development in zebrafish. Via in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrated that zebrafish inaa is an α-internexin homolog that shares characteristics with nIFs. An immunohistochemical analysis of zebrafish revealed that inaa was distributed dynamically in the developing retina. It was widely localized in retinal neuroepithelial cells at 1 day postfertilization (dpf), and was mainly found in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner part of the inner nuclear layer (INL) from 3-9 dpf; after 14 dpf, it was restricted to the outer nuclear layer (ONL). Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that inaa acted distinctively from the cytoskeletal scaffold of zebrafish cone photoreceptors during development. In conclusion, we demonstrated the morphological features of a novel nIF, inaa, and illustrated its developmental expression pattern in the zebrafish retina. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3810-3826, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Basal bodies exhibit polarized positioning in zebrafish cone photoreceptors.

  • Ramsey M
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2013 Jun 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The asymmetric positioning of basal bodies, and therefore cilia, is often critical for proper cilia function. This planar polarity is critical for motile cilia function but has not been extensively investigated for nonmotile cilia or for sensory cilia such as vertebrate photoreceptors. Zebrafish photoreceptors form an organized mosaic ideal for investigating cilia positioning. We report that, in the adult retina, the basal bodies of red-, green-, and blue-sensitive cone photoreceptors localized asymmetrically on the cell edge nearest the optic nerve. In contrast, no patterning was seen in the basal bodies of ultraviolet-sensitive cones or in rod photoreceptors. The asymmetric localization of basal bodies was consistent in all regions of the adult retina. Basal body patterning was unaffected in the cones of the XOPS-mCFP transgenic line, which lacks rod photoreceptors. Finally, the adult pattern was not seen in 7-days-postfertilization (dpf) larvae; basal bodies were randomly distributed in all the photoreceptor subtypes. These results establish the asymmetrical localization of basal bodies in red-, green-, and blue-sensitive cones in adult zebrafish retinas but not in larvae. This pattern suggests an active cellular mechanism regulated the positioning of basal bodies after the transition to the adult mosaic and that rods do not seem to be necessary for the patterning of cone basal bodies.

Localization of Cadm2a and Cadm3 proteins during development of the zebrafish nervous system.

  • Hunter PR
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2011 Aug 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Members of the Cadm/SynCAM/Necl/IGSF/TSLC family of cell adhesion molecules are known to have diverse functions during development of the nervous system, but information regarding their role during central nervous system (CNS) development in vivo is scarce. The rapid development of a relatively simple nervous system in larval zebrafish makes them a highly tractable model organism for studying gene function during nervous system development. An essential prerequisite for functional studies is a description of protein localization. To address this we have generated subtype-specific antibodies to two members of the zebrafish cell adhesion molecule family: cadm2a and cadm3. Using these novel antibodies we show that cadm3 and cadm2a are expressed throughout the nervous system of larval stage zebrafish. Particularly striking, and largely nonoverlapping expression of cadm2a and cadm3 is observed in the developing retina and spinal cord. Using in vitro binding assays we show that cadm2a and cadm3 bind heterophilically and preferentially to cadm1 and cadm4, respectively. These binding preferences are very similar to those seen for tetrapod Cadms but our study of protein localization suggests novel and diverse functions of cadms during nervous system development.

Funding information:
  • NIBIB NIH HHS - EB006733(United States)

Conditional gene expression and lineage tracing of tuba1a expressing cells during zebrafish development and retina regeneration.

  • Ramachandran R
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Oct 15

Literature context:


Abstract:

The tuba1a gene encodes a neural-specific α-tubulin isoform whose expression is restricted to the developing and regenerating nervous system. By using zebrafish as a model system for studying CNS regeneration, we recently showed that retinal injury induces tuba1a gene expression in Müller glia that reentered the cell cycle. However, because of the transient nature of tuba1a gene expression during development and regeneration, it was not possible to trace the lineage of the tuba1a-expressing cells with a reporter directly under the control of the tuba1a promoter. To overcome this limitation, we generated tuba1a:CreER(T2) and β-actin2:loxP-mCherrry-loxP-GFP double transgenic fish that allowed us to label tuba1a-expressing cells conditionally and permanently via ligand-induced recombination. During development, recombination revealed transient tuba1a expression in not only neural progenitors but also cells that contribute to skeletal muscle, heart, and intestine. In the adult, recombination revealed tuba1a expression in brain, olfactory neurons, and sensory cells of the lateral line, but not in the retina. After retinal injury, recombination showed tuba1a expression in Müller glia that had reentered the cell cycle, and lineage tracing indicated that these cells are responsible for regenerating retinal neurons and glia. These results suggest that tuba1a-expressing progenitors contribute to multiple cell lineages during development and that tuba1a-expressing Müller glia are retinal progenitors in the adult.

Funding information:
  • NIGMS NIH HHS - R01 GM077138(United States)

Dynamic expression of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor neuroD in the rod and cone photoreceptor lineages in the retina of the embryonic and larval zebrafish.

  • Ochocinska MJ
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2007 Mar 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

NeuroD is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor critical for determining neuronal cell fate and regulating withdrawal from the cell cycle. We showed previously that, in goldfish, neuroD is expressed in the rod photoreceptor lineage, and we inferred that neuroD is also expressed in a subset of amacrine cells and nascent cone photoreceptors. Here we extended that study by examining the temporal and spatial expression pattern of neuroD in the embryonic and larval zebrafish and by identifying the cell types that express this gene. NeuroD expression in the developing zebrafish retina is dynamic, spanning early retinogenesis and the maturation of cone photoreceptors. In early retinogenesis neuroD expression expands from a small patch in the ventronasal retina, through the remaining retinal neuroepithelium. As retinogenesis progresses, neuroD expression becomes restricted to amacrine cells, immature cones, and cells of rod and cone lineages. This expression achieves an adult pattern by 96 hours postfertilization (hpf), whereupon the temporal pattern of neuroD expression in central retina is spatially recapitulated at the germinative margin. The cellular pattern of expression suggests that neuroD regulates aspects of rod and cone genesis, but through separate cellular lineages. Furthermore, neuroD is coexpressed with the cone-rod-homeobox transcription factor (Crx) in putative cone progenitors and nascent cone photoreceptors, suggesting that, in the zebrafish retina, as in other vertebrate retinas, similar genetic cascades regulate photoreceptor genesis and maturation.

Funding information:
  • NIA NIH HHS - F31 AG044061(United States)

Degeneration and regeneration of ultraviolet cone photoreceptors during development in rainbow trout.

  • Allison WT
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2006 Dec 10

Literature context:


Abstract:

Ultraviolet-sensitive (UVS) cones disappear from the retina of salmonid fishes during a metamorphosis that prepares them for deeper/marine waters. UVS cones subsequently reappear in the retina near sexual maturation and the return migration to natal streams. Cellular mechanisms of this UVS cone ontogeny were investigated using electroretinograms, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry against opsins during and after thyroid hormone (TH) treatments of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Increasing TH levels led to UVS cone degeneration. Labeling demonstrated that UVS cone degeneration occurs via programmed cell death and caspase inhibitors can inhibit this death. After the cessation of TH treatment, UVS cones regenerated in the retina. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was applied after the termination of TH treatment and was detected in the nuclei of cells expressing UVS opsin. BrdU was found in UVS cones but not other cone types. The most parsimonious explanation for the data is that UVS cones degenerated and UVS cones were regenerated from intrinsic retinal progenitor cells. Regenerating UVS cones were functionally integrated such that they were able to elicit electrical responses from second-order neurons. This is the first report of cones regenerating during natural development. Both the death and regeneration of cones in retinae represent novel mechanisms for tuning visual systems to new visual tasks or environments.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - N43-ES-15477(United States)