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Cite this (EyeBrowse, RRID:SCR_008000)

URL: http://eyebrowse.cit.nih.gov/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

EyeBrowse displays expressed sequence tag (EST) cDNA clones from eye tissues (derived from NEIBank and other sources) aligned with current versions of the human, rhesus, mouse, rat, dog, cow, chicken, or zebrafish genomes, including reference sequences for known genes. This gives a simplified view of gene expression activity from different parts of the eye across the genome. The data can be interrogated in several ways. Specific gene names can be entered into the search window. Alternatively, regions of the genome can be displayed. For example, entering two STS markers separated by a semicolon (e.g. RH18061;RH80175) allows the display of the entire chromosomal region associated with the mapping of a specific disease locus. ESTs for each tissue can then be displayed to help in the selection of candidate genes. In addition, sequences can be entered into a BLAT search and rapidly aligned on the genome, again showing eye derived ESTs for the same region. EyeBrowse includes a custom track display SAGE data for human eye tissues derived from the EyeSAGE project. The track shows the normalized sum of SAGE tag counts from all published eye-related SAGE datasets centered on the position of each identifiable Unigene cluster. This indicates relative activity of each gene locus in eye. Clicking on the vertical count bar for a particular location will bring up a display listing gene details and linking to specific SAGE counts for each eye SAGE library and comparisons with normalized sums for neural and non-neural tissues. To view or alter settings for the EyeSAGE track on EyeBrowse, click on the vertical gray bar at the left of the display. Other custom tracks display known eye disease genes and mapped intervals for candidate loci for retinal disease, cataract, myopia and cornea disease. These link back to further information at NEIBank. For mouse, there is custom track data for ChIP-on-Chip of RNA-Polymerase-II during photoreceptor maturation.
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    NEIBank

Cite this (NEIBank, RRID:SCR_007294)

URL: http://neibank.nei.nih.gov

Resource Type: Resource, data analysis service, production service resource, analysis service resource, database, service resource, data or information resource

An integrated resource for genomics and bioinformatics in vision research including expressed sequence tag (EST) data and sequence-verified cDNA clones for multiple eye tissues of several species, web-based access to human eye-specific SAGE data through EyeSAGE, and comprehensive, annotated databases of known human eye disease genes and candidate disease gene loci. All expression- and disease-related data are integrated in EyeBrowse, an eye-centric genome browser. NEIBank provides a comprehensive overview of current knowledge of the transcriptional repertoires of eye tissues and their relation to pathology. The data can be interrogated in several ways. Specific gene names can be entered into the search window. Alternatively, regions of the genome can be displayed. For example, entering two STS markers separated by a semicolon (e.g. RH18061;RH80175) allows the display of the entire chromosomal region associated with the mapping of a specific disease locus. ESTs for each tissue can then be displayed to help in the selection of candidate genes. In addition, sequences can be entered into a BLAST search and rapidly aligned on the genome, again showing eye derived ESTs for the same region. To see the same region at the full UCSC site, cut and paste the location from the position window of the genome browser. EyeBrowse includes a custom track display SAGE data for human eye tissues derived from the EyeSAGE project. The track shows the normalized sum of SAGE tag counts from all published eye-related SAGE datasets centered on the position of each identifiable Unigene cluster. This indicates relative activity of each gene locus in eye. Clicking on the vertical count bar for a particular location will bring up a display listing gene details and linking to specific SAGE counts for each eye SAGE library and comparisons with normalized sums for neural and non-neural tissues. To view or alter settings for the EyeSAGE track on EyeBrowse, click on the vertical gray bar at the left of the display. Other custom tracks display known eye disease genes and mapped intervals for candidate loci for retinal disease, cataract, myopia and cornea disease. These link back to further information at NEIBank.

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