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on page 1 showing 20 out of 136 results

    ACCORD

Cite this ( ACCORD , RRID:SCR_009015)

URL: https://www.accordtrial.org/public

Resource Type: Resource, resource, clinical trial

Study testing whether strict glucose control lowers the risk of heart disease and stroke in adults with type 2 diabetes. In addition the study is exploring: 1) Whether in the context of good glycemic control the use of different lowering lipid drugs will further improve these outcomes and 2) If strict control of blood pressure will also have additional beneficial effects on reducing cardiovascular disease. The design was a randomized, multicenter, double 2 X 2 factorial trial in 10,251 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It was designed to test the effects on major CVD events of intensive glycemia control, of fibrate treatment to increase HDL-cholesterol and lower triglycerides (in the context of good LDL-C and glycemia control), and of intensive blood pressure control (in the context of good glycemia control), each compared to an appropriate control. All 10,251 participants were in an overarching glycemia trial. In addition, one 2 X 2 trial addressed the lipid question in 5,518 of the participants and the other 2 X 2 trial addressed the blood pressure question in 4,733 of the participants. The glycemia trial was terminated early due to higher mortality in the intensive compared with the standard glycemia treatment strategies. The results were published in June 2008 (N Eng J Med 2008;358:2545-59). Study-delivered treatment for all ACCORD participants was stopped on June 30, 2009, and the participants were assisted as needed in transferring their care to a personal physician. The lipid and blood pressure results (as well as the microvascular outcomes and eye substudy results) were published in 2010. All participants are continuing to be followed in a non-treatment observational study.

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Cite this (Add Health (National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health), RRID:SCR_007434)

URL: http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

Longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. Public data on about 21,000 people first surveyed in 1994 are available on the first phases of the study, as well as study design specifications. It also includes some parent and biomarker data. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The restricted-use contract includes four hours of free consultation with appropriate staff; after that, there''s a fee for help. Researchers can also share information through a listserv devoted to the database.

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Cite this (Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE), RRID:SCR_000813)

URL: http://crag.uab.edu/crag/active.asp

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Data set from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive interventions designed to maintain functional independence in elders by improving basic mental abilities. Several features made ACTIVE unique in the field of cognitive interventions: (a) use of a multi-site, randomized, controlled, single-blind design; (b) intervention on a large, diverse sample; (c) use of common multi-site intervention protocols, (d) primary outcomes focused on long-term, cognitively demanding functioning as measured by performance-based tests of daily activities; and (e) an intent-to-treat analytical approach. The clinical trial ended with the second annual post-test in January 2002. A third annual post-test was completed in December 2003. The area population and recruitment strategies at the six field sites provided a study sample varying in racial, ethnic, gender, socioeconomic, and cognitive characteristics. At baseline, data were collected by telephone for eligibility screening, followed by three in-person assessment sessions, including two individual sessions and one group session, and a self-administered questionnaire. At post-tests, data were collected in-person in one individual session and one group session as well as by self-administered questionnaire. There were four major categories of measures: proximal outcomes (measures of cognitive abilities that were direct targets of training), primary outcomes (measures of everyday functioning, both self-report and performance), secondary outcomes (measures of health, mobility, quality of life, and service utilization), and covariates (chronic disease, physical characteristics, depressive symptoms, cognitive impairment, psychosocial variables, and demographics). Phase I of ACTIVE was a randomized controlled, single-blind trial utilizing a four-group design, including three treatment arms and a no-contact control group. Each treatment arm consisted of a 10-session intervention for one of three cognitive abilities memory, reasoning, and speed of processing. Testers were blind to participant treatment assignment. The design allowed for testing of both social contact effects (via the contact control group) and retest effects (via the no-contact control group) on outcomes. Booster training was provided in each treatment arm to a 60% random subsample prior to first annual post-test. Phase II of ACTIVE started in July, 2003 as a follow-up study focused on measuring the long-term impact of training effects on cognitive function and cognitively demanding everyday activities. The follow-up consisted of one assessment to include the Phase I post-test battery. This was completed in late 2004.

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Cite this (Aged Rodent Tissue Arrays, RRID:SCR_007332)

URL: http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/dab/aged-rodent-tissue-bank-handbook/tissue-arrays

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial analysis service, analysis service resource, service resource, production service resource, material analysis service

Offer high-throughput analysis of tissue histology and protein expression for the biogerontology research community. Each array is a 4 micron section that includes tissue cores from multiple tissues at multiple ages on one slide. The arrays are made from ethanol-fixed tissue and can be used for all techniques for which conventional tissue sections can be used. Ages are chosen to span the life from young adult to very old age. (available ages: 4, 12, 18, 24 and 28 months of age) Images of H&E stained punches are available for Liver, Cardiac Muscle, and Brain. The NIA aged rodent tissue arrays were developed with assistance from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Tissue Array Research Program (TARP), led by Dr. Stephen Hewitt, Director. NCI TARP contains more information on tissue array construction, protocols for using arrays, and references. Preparation and Product Description Tissue arrays are prepared in parallel from different sets of animals so that experiments can be conducted in duplicate, with each array using unique animals with a unique product number. The product descriptions page describes each array, including: * Strain * Gender * Ages * Tissues * Animal Identification Numbers

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Cite this (Aged Rodent Tissue Bank, RRID:SCR_010607)

URL: http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/dab/aged-rodent-tissue-bank-handbook

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial supply resource, material resource, tissue bank

A repository of tissue collected from the NIA Aged Rodent Colonies under contractual arrangement with BioReliance. The NIA colonies are barrier maintained and Specific Pathogen Free. Tissues are fresh frozen and stored at -80 degrees Celsius. Tissue from the NIA Aged Rodent Tissue Bank is available to investigators at academic and nonprofit research institutions who are engaged in funded research on aging. The project name and source of funding must accompany all orders. It may not be possible to ship tissue to foreign countries that have restrictions on the import of animal tissues or products. Please Note: Incomplete order forms will be returned. We can only offer following week delivery for those orders for which completed order forms are received by the deadline of Tuesday noon, Eastern time. Starting April 1, 2012, a copy (.pdf) of the purchase order must be emailed along with the order form.

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Cite this (Aging Status and Sense of Control (ASOC), RRID:SCR_013500)

URL: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/03334

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

A dataset generated longitudinal study that aims to explain the relationship between age and changes in the sense of control over one''''s life, over two follow-up periods. The main hypotheses are (a) over a period of time, the sense of control declines by an amount that increases with age; (b) the change in sense of control reflects an underlying change in biosocial function, which accelerates with age; (c) higher social status slows the decline in the sense of control, possibly by preserving biosocial function; and (d) changes in biosocial function and in the sense of control have deviation-amplifying reciprocal effects that accelerate age-dependent changes in the sense of control. This was a three-wave panel survey with fixed 3-year intervals and repeated assessments of the same variables. Questionnaire topics focused on: physical health (subjective health; activities of daily living; height and weight; health conditions; expected personal longevity); health behavior (exercise, smoking, diet, alcohol use); use of medical services (medical insurance coverage, prescription drug use); work status (current employment status; title of current job or occupation and job description; types of work, tasks, or activities; description of work or daily activity and interactions; supervisory status; management position and level; work history); sense of controlextent of agreement or disagreement with planning and responsibility versus luck and bad breaks; sense of victimhood versus control; social support and participation; personal and household demographics; marital and family relations; socioeconomic status; history of adversity. * Dates of Study: 1994-2001 * Sample Size: 2,593 (Waves 1-2); 1.144 (Wave 3) * Study Features: Longitudinal Data Archives: http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/issr/da/da_catalog/da_catalog_titleRecord.php?studynumber=I3334V1

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Cite this (Alameda County Health and Ways of Living Study, RRID:SCR_008889)

URL: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/04432#summary

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Data set from a long-term population-based prospective study of non-institutionalized residents (aged 21 or older, or aged 16-21 and older if married) in Alameda County, California investigating social and behavioral risk factors for morbidity, mortality, functioning and health. Questions were asked on marital and life satisfaction, parenting, physical activities, employment, health status, and childhood experiences. Demographic information on age, race, height, weight, education, income, and religion was also collected. Included with this dataset is a separate file (part 2) containing mortality data. With the aging of this cohort, data are becoming increasingly valuable for examining the life-long cumulative effects of social and behavioral factors on a well-characterized population. The first wave collected information for 6,928 respondents (including approximately 500 women aged 65 years and older) on chronic health conditions, health behaviors, social involvements, and psychological characteristics. The 1974 questionnaire was sent to 6,246 living subjects who had responded in 1965, and were able to be located. The third wave provides a follow-up of 2,729 original 1965 and 1974 respondents and examines health behaviors such as alcohol consumption and smoking habits, along with social activities. Also included is information on health conditions such as diabetes, osteoporosis, hormone replacement, and mental illness. Another central topic investigated is activities of daily living (including self-care such as dressing, eating, and shopping), along with use of free time and level of involvement in social, recreational, religious, and environmental groups. The fourth wave is a follow-up to the 1994 panel and examines changes in functional abilities such as self-care activities, employment, involvement in community activities, visiting friends/family, and use of free time since 1994. * Dates of Study: 1965-1999 * Sample Size: 1965: 6,928; 1974: 4,864; 1994: 2,729; 1995: 2,569, 1999: 2,123 * Study Features: Longitudinal Links: * 1965 ICPSR, http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06688 * 1974 ICPSR, http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06838 * 1994 and 1995 ICPSR, http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/03083 * 1999 ICPSR, http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/04432#summary

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Cite this (ALSA - The Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing, RRID:SCR_013146)

URL: http://www.flinders.edu.au/sabs/fcas/alsa/alsa_home.cfm

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial supply resource, data or information resource, material resource, database

The general purpose of ALSA is to examine how social, biomedical, psychological, economic, and environmental factors are associated with age-related changes in the health and wellbeing of persons aged 70 years and older. The aim is to analyze the complex relationships between individual and social factors and changes in health status, health care needs and service utilization dimensions, with emphasis given to the effects of social and economic factors on morbidity, disability, acute and long-term care service use, and mortality. The study was designed to have common instrumentation with US studies. ALSA collected data from a random, stratified sample of all persons (both community and institution-dwelling) aged 70 years and older living in the metropolitan area of Adelaide, South Australia, using the State Electoral Database as the sampling frame. Spouses aged 65 and older and other household members aged 70 years and older also were invited to participate. The initial baseline data collection for ALSA began in September 1992 and was completed in March 1993. In the first wave, personal interviews were carried out for 2,087 participants, including 566 couples (that is, persons 70 years of age and over and their spouse, if 65 and over). Clinical assessments were obtained for 1,620 of the participants. Respondents were recontacted by telephone a year after initial interview (wave 2). The third wave of the study began in September 1994 and involved a complete reassessment, with a total of 1,679 interviews and 1,423 clinical assessments. To date, eleven waves of data have been collected, with the latest collection in May 2010, from 168 participants. Six of these waves were conducted via face-to-face interviews and clinical assessments, and five were telephone interviews. Future waves are planned, however are dependent on grant funding. Ancillary data collection has been ongoing since the initiation of the study, e.g., from secondary providers. Lists of ALSA participants are compared biannually with the agencies'' lists to determine the prevalence and incidence of receipt of services from these organizations. Another source of information has been the collection of data from the participants'' general practitioners about the respondent''s health status, history of services received, medication use, referrals to specialists, and current services provided. Baseline Sample Size: 2087 Dates of Study: 1992??????????2010 (potentially ongoing) Study Features: * Longitudinal * International * Anthropometric Measures * Biospecimens Waves 1-5 (ICPSR), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06707 Wave 6 (ICPSR), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/03679

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Cite this (Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study, RRID:SCR_008254)

URL: http://www.adcs.org/

Resource Type: Resource, disease-related portal, topical portal, assessment test provider, biomaterial supply resource, tissue bank, portal, material resource, data or information resource

An initiative for Alzheimer's disease clinical studies that works to facilitate the discovery, development and testing of new drugs, and is a part of the Alzheimer's Disease Prevention Initiative. This resource has an emphasis on expanding the range of its patients, mainly by enhancing the recruitment of minority groups. There is a further emphasis placed on testing agents that cannot be patented, as well as developing novel compounds that had been developed by individuals, academic institutions and drug discovery units. This resource also helps in the development of Alzheimer's disease centers to carry out studies, as well as establish administrative, data, operations and medical cores in San Diego. This organization is specifically involved in studies demonstrating the lack of benefit associated, previously used treatments such as: the use of estrogen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, B vitamins and a statin drug. The Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study also develops assessment instruments to be used in clinical trials. The most frequently used of these tools include: the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive sub-scale (ADAS-cog), Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and the Clinical Global Impression of Change Scale (CGIC). There is also an associated tissue bank at UCSD that includes materials from the clinical trials including: human tissue, blood, plasma, DNA, urine and cerebrospinal fluid.

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Cite this (Alzheimers Disease Genetics Consortium, RRID:SCR_004004)

URL: http://www.adgenetics.org/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, organization portal, portal, consortium, data or information resource

Consortium to conduct genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genes associated with an increased risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer''''s disease (LOAD). The goal of the ADGC is to identify genetic variants associated with risk for AD. It plans to do this through the following collaborative goals: # Identify genes responsible for AD susceptibility # Identify AD sub-phenotype genes rate-of-progression plaque / tangle load / distribution biomarker variability # Generate a genetic data resource for the AD research community Data generated by ADGC is available at the following website: https://www.niagads.org/content/alzheimers-disease-genetics-consortium-adgc-collection

  • From Current Category

Cite this (AMP-AD Knowledge Portal, RRID:SCR_016316)

URL: https://www.synapse.org/ampad

Resource Type: Resource, service resource, data repository, storage service resource

Repository for distribution of various types of molecular data from human, cell-based and animal model biosamples, analytical results and research tools generated through multiple NIA-supported programs. Currently the Portal supports the AMP-AD Target Discovery and Preclinical Validation and MOVE-AD Consortia and the translational center, MODEL-AD.

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Cite this (Automatic Analysis, RRID:SCR_003560)

URL: https://github.com/automaticanalysis/automaticanalysis

Resource Type: Resource, software resource, software application, data analysis software, data processing software, image analysis software

Software pipeline system for neuroimaging workflow and parallel processing. Used to facilitate automatic, flexible, and replicable neuroimaging analyses, fMRI modeling, voxel based morphometry, DWI analysis, cortical surface based measures.

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Cite this (BatchTINT, RRID:SCR_014804)

URL: https://github.com/HussainiLab/BatchTINTV3

Resource Type: Resource, software resource, software application, software repository, data analysis software, data processing software

GUI created by the Taub Institute in order to create an end-user friendly batch processing solution to complement Axona's new command line modification of TINT. This GUI allows the user to define a directory. Within this directory it will be continuously (unless closed) searching for new files to analyze via TINT.

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    BECA

Cite this (BECA, RRID:SCR_015846)

URL: http://www.iu.edu/~beca/

Resource Type: Resource, software resource, image analysis software, data visualization software, data processing software, software application

Visualization and analysis software for interactive visual exploration and mining of fiber-tracts and brain networks with their genetic determinants and functional outcomes. BECA includes an fMRI and Diseases Analysis version as well as a Genome Explorer version.

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Cite this (BMAP - Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, RRID:SCR_008852)

URL: http://trans.nih.gov/bmap/index.htm

Resource Type: Resource, topical portal, portal, funding resource, data or information resource

The Brain Molecular Anatomy Project is a trans-NIH project aimed at understanding gene expression and function in the nervous system. BMAP has two major scientific goals: # Gene discovery: to catalog of all the genes expressed in the nervous system, under both normal and abnormal conditions. # Gene expression analysis: to monitor gene expression patterns in the nervous system as a function of cell type, anatomical location, developmental stage, and physiological state, and thus gain insight into gene function. In pursuit of these goals, BMAP has launched several initiatives to provide resources and funding opportunities for the scientific community. These include several Requests for Applications and Requests for Proposals, descriptions of which can be found in this Web site. BMAP is also in the process of establishing physical and electronic resources for the community, including repositories of cDNA clones for nervous system genes, and databases of gene expression information for the nervous system. Most of the BMAP initiatives so far have focused on the mouse as a model species because of the ease of experimental and genetic manipulation of this organism, and because many models of human disease are available in the mouse. However, research in humans, other mammalian species, non-mammalian vertebrates, and invertebrates is also being funded through BMAP. For the convenience of interested investigators, we have established this Web site as a central information resource, focusing on major NIH-sponsored funding opportunities, initiatives, genomic resources available to the research community, courses and scientific meetings related to BMAP initiatives, and selected reports and publications. When appropriate, we will also post initiatives not directly sponsored by BMAP, but which are deemed relevant to its goals. Posting decisions are made by the Trans-NIH BMAP Committee

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    BRAID

Cite this (BRAID, RRID:SCR_008702)

URL: http://www.rad.upenn.edu/sbia/braid/braid_web/index.html

Resource Type: Resource, software resource, source code, image, data or information resource, database

Large-scale archive of normalized digital spatial and functional data with an analytical query mechanism. One of its many applications is the elucidation of brain structure-function relationships. BRAID stores spatially defined data from digital brain images which have been mapped into normalized Cartesian coordinates, allowing image data from large populations of patients to be combined and compared. The database also contains neurological data from each patient and a query mechanism that can perform statistical structure-function correlations. The project is developing database technology for the manipulation and analysis of 3-dimensional brain images derived from MRI, PET, CT, etc. BRAID is based on the PostgreSQL server, an object/relational DBMS, which allows a standard relational DBMS to be augmented with application-specific datatypes and operators. The BRAID project is adding operations and datatypes to support querying, manipulation and analysis of 3D medical images, including: * Image Datatypes: BRAID supports a family of 3D image datatypes, each having an abstract type and an implementation type. Abstract types include boolean (for regions of interest), integer, float, vector (for representing morphological changes), tensor (for representing derivatives and standard deviations of vector images) and color. Implementation types at present include line-segment format and voxel array. * Image Operators: BRAID supports addition of images, multiplication (which is interpreted as intersection for boolean images), coercion of an image''s abstract or implementation type to another value, and determination of volumes of regions of interest. * Statistical Operators: A chi-squared test has been added to SQL as an aggregate operator on pairs of boolean values. * Web Interface: A general-purpose Web gateway allows the results of queries that return computed images to be displayed. You can download the BRAID source code 2.0. This version is developed under postgreSQL 7.3.4.

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    CADRO

Cite this (CADRO, RRID:SCR_004046)

URL: http://iadrp.nia.nih.gov/content/about-cadro

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, controlled vocabulary

A classification system developed by the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association that can be used to integrate and compare Alzheimer's disease (AD) research portfolios from public and private organizations supporting AD research in the US and abroad. The CADRO was constructed as a three-tier classification system organized around seven major categories: five in research and two resource-related: * Category A. Molecular Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease * Category B. Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring * Category C. Translational Research and Clinical Interventions * Category D. Epidemiology * Category E. Care, Support and Health Economics of Alzheimer's Diseases * Category F. Research Resources * Category G. Consortia and Public Private Partnerships * Category H. Alzheimer's Disease - Related Dementias Using information from project abstracts and research aims, the above categories were stratified into research topics and these were further divided into research themes. The three levels of classification are meant to enable a fine-grained portfolio analysis that can inform strategic planning and funding decisions. The CADRO was developed as a dynamic portfolio analysis tool that can be used to: (i) capture the changing landscape of AD research funded by different organizations, (ii) identify opportunities for coordination of support for AD research, and (iii) identify funding gaps as well as areas of overlap within and across organizations.

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    CAWorks

Cite this (CAWorks, RRID:SCR_014185)

URL: http://www.nitrc.org/projects/caworks

Resource Type: Resource, software resource, image analysis software, data processing software, software application

A software application developed to support computational anatomy and shape analysis. The capabilities of CAWorks include: interactive landmark placement to create segmentation (mask) of desired region of interest; specialized landmark placement plugins for subcortical structures such as hippocampus and amygdala; support for multiple Medical Imaging data formats, such as Nifti, Analyze, Freesurfer, DICOM and landmark data; Quadra Planar view visualization; and shape analysis plugin modules, such as Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM). Specific plugins are available for landmark placement of the hippocampus, amygdala and entorhinal cortex regions, as well as a browser plugin module for the Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit.

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Cite this (Cell Properties Database, RRID:SCR_007285)

URL: http://senselab.med.yale.edu/cellpropdb

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

A repository for data regarding membrane channels, receptor and neurotransmitters that are expressed in specific types of cells. The database is presently focused on neurons but will eventually include other cell types, such as glia, muscle, and gland cells. This resource is intended to: * Serve as a repository for data on gene products expressed in different brain regions * Support research on cellular properties in the nervous system * Provide a gateway for entering data into the cannonical neuron forms in NeuronDB * Identify receptors across neuron types to aid in drug development * Serve as a first step toward a functional genomics of nerve cells * Serve as a teaching aid

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Cite this (Census Microdata Samples Project, RRID:SCR_008902)

URL: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/Pledge/all.jsp

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

A data set of cross-nationally comparable microdata samples for 15 Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) countries (Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, UK, USA) based on the 1990 national population and housing censuses in countries of Europe and North America to study the social and economic conditions of older persons. These samples have been designed to allow research on a wide range of issues related to aging, as well as on other social phenomena. A common set of nomenclatures and classifications, derived on the basis of a study of census data comparability in Europe and North America, was adopted as a standard for recoding. This series was formerly called Dynamics of Population Aging in ECE Countries. The recommendations regarding the design and size of the samples drawn from the 1990 round of censuses envisaged: (1) drawing individual-based samples of about one million persons; (2) progressive oversampling with age in order to ensure sufficient representation of various categories of older people; and (3) retaining information on all persons co-residing in the sampled individual''''s dwelling unit. Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania provided the entire population over age 50, while Finland sampled it with progressive over-sampling. Canada, Italy, Russia, Turkey, UK, and the US provided samples that had not been drawn specially for this project, and cover the entire population without over-sampling. Given its wide user base, the US 1990 PUMS was not recoded. Instead, PAU offers mapping modules, which recode the PUMS variables into the project''''s classifications, nomenclatures, and coding schemes. Because of the high sampling density, these data cover various small groups of older people; contain as much geographic detail as possible under each country''''s confidentiality requirements; include more extensive information on housing conditions than many other data sources; and provide information for a number of countries whose data were not accessible until recently. Data Availability: Eight of the fifteen participating countries have signed the standard data release agreement making their data available through NACDA/ICPSR (see links below). Hungary and Switzerland require a clearance to be obtained from their national statistical offices for the use of microdata, however the documents signed between the PAU and these countries include clauses stipulating that, in general, all scholars interested in social research will be granted access. Russia requested that certain provisions for archiving the microdata samples be removed from its data release arrangement. The PAU has an agreement with several British scholars to facilitate access to the 1991 UK data through collaborative arrangements. Statistics Canada and the Italian Institute of statistics (ISTAT) provide access to data from Canada and Italy, respectively. * Dates of Study: 1989-1992 * Study Features: International, Minority Oversamples * Sample Size: Approx. 1 million/country Links: * Bulgaria (1992), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/02200 * Czech Republic (1991), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06857 * Estonia (1989), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06780 * Finland (1990), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06797 * Romania (1992), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06900 * Latvia (1989), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/02572 * Lithuania (1989), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/03952 * Turkey (1990), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/03292 * U.S. (1990), http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06219

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