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Cite this (NIH Human Connectome Project, RRID:SCR_006942)

URL: http://humanconnectome.org/consortia/

Resource Type: Resource, organization portal, portal, consortium, data or information resource

Project to map the neural pathways that underlie human brain function for several modalities of neuroimaging data including fMRI. The purpose of the Project is to acquire and share data about the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain. It will greatly advance the capabilities for imaging and analyzing brain connections, resulting in improved sensitivity, resolution, and utility, thereby accelerating progress in the emerging field of human connectomics. Altogether, the Human Connectome Project will lead to major advances in the understanding of what makes us uniquely human and will set the stage for future studies of abnormal brain circuits in many neurological and psychiatric disorders. The sixteen institutes and centers of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience have funded two major grants that will take complementary approaches to deciphering the brain's amazingly complex wiring diagram. An 11-institution consortium led by Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Minnesota received a 5-year grant to enable development and utilization of advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods to chart brain circuitry. A consortium led by Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of California at Los Angeles received a grant to enable building and refining a next-generation 3T MR scanner that improves the quality and spatial resolution with which brain connectivity data can be acquired at this field strength.

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Cite this (NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development, RRID:SCR_003394)

URL: http://www.pediatricmri.nih.gov/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, narrative resource, experimental protocol, data or information resource

Data sets of clinical / behavioral and image data are available for download by qualified researchers from a seven year, multi-site, longitudinal study using magnetic resonance technologies to study brain maturation in healthy, typically-developing infants, children, and adolescents and to correlate brain development with cognitive and behavioral development. The information obtained in this study is expected to provide essential data for understanding the course of normal brain development as a basis for understanding atypical brain development associated with a variety of developmental, neurological, and neuropsychiatric disorders affecting children and adults. This study enrolled over 500 children, ranging from infancy to young adulthood. The goal was to study each participant at least three times over the course of the project at one of six Pediatric Centers across the United States. Brain MR and clinical/behavioral data have been compiled and analyzed at a Data Coordinating Center and Clinical Coordinating Center. Additionally, MR spectroscopy and DTI data are being analyzed. The study was organized around two objectives corresponding to two age ranges at the time of enrollment, each with its own protocols. * Objective 1 enrolled children ages 4 years, 6 months through 18 years (total N = 433). This sample was recruited across the six Pediatric Study Centers using community based sampling to reflect the demographics of the United States in terms of income, race, and ethnicity. The subjects were studied with both imaging and clinical/behavioral measures at two year intervals for three time points. * Objective 2 enrolled newborns, infants, toddlers, and preschoolers from birth through 4 years, 5 months, who were studied three or more times at two Pediatric Study Centers at intervals ranging from three months for the youngest subjects to one year as the children approach the Objective 1 age range. Both imaging and clinical/behavioral measures were collected at each time point. Participant recruitment used community based sampling that included hospital venues (e.g., maternity wards and nurseries, satellite physician offices, and well-child clinics), community organizations (e.g., day-care centers, schools, and churches), and siblings of children participating in other research at the Pediatric Study Centers. At timepoint 1, of those enrolled, 114 children had T1 scans that passed quality control checks. Staged data release plan: The first data release included structural MR images and clinical/behavioral data from the first assessments, Visit 1, for Objective 1. A second data release included structural MRI and clinical/behavioral data from the second visit for Objective 1. A third data release included structural MRI data for both Objective 1 and 2 and all time points, as well as preliminary spectroscopy data. A fourth data release added cortical thickness, gyrification and cortical surface data. Yet to be released are longitudinally registered anatomic MRI data and diffusion tensor data. A collaborative effort among the participating centers and NIH resulted in age-appropriate MR protocols and clinical/behavioral batteries of instruments. A summary of this protocol is available as a Protocol release document. Details of the project, such as study design, rationale, recruitment, instrument battery, MRI acquisition details, and quality controls can be found in the study protocol. Also available are the MRI procedure manual and Clinical/Behavioral procedure manuals for Objective 1 and Objective 2.

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