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on page 1 showing 16 out of 16 results

Cite this (Boston University Alzheimer's Disease Center, RRID:SCR_010692)

URL: http://www.bu.edu/alzresearch/index.html

Resource Type: Resource, disease-related portal, topical portal, training resource, portal, data or information resource

The goal of the Alzheimers Disease Center is to help reduce the human and economic costs associated with Alzheimers disease through the advancement of knowledge. The primary missions of the Center are to: conduct and facilitate cutting-edge Alzheimers disease research; enhance clinical care for Alzheimers disease patients and their families; and provide education regarding Alzheimers disease to both professional and lay audiences. The Center is made up of a multidisciplinary group of professionals dedicated to research, clinical care, and education.

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Cite this (Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), RRID:SCR_008904)

URL: http://centerforaging.duke.edu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=115&Itemid=152

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

The project has been collecting detailed panel data about the health, disability, demographic, family, socioeconomic, and behavioral risk-factors for mortality and healthy longevity of the oldest old, with a comparative sub-sample of younger elders, to examine the factors in healthy longevity. The baseline survey was conducted in 1998 and the follow-up surveys with replacement to compensate for deceased elders were conducted in 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2008, For each centenarian, one near-by octogenarian (aged 80-89) and one near-by nonagenarian (aged 90-99) of pre-designated age and sex were interviewed. Near-by is loosely defined it could be in the same village or street if available, or in the same town or in the same county or city. The idea was to have comparable numbers of male and female octogenarians and nonagenarians at each age from 80 to 99. In 2002, the study added a refresher sub-sample of 4,845 interviewees aged 65-79, and a sub-sample of 4,478 adult children (aged 35-65) of the elderly interviewees aged 65-110 in eight provinces Comparative study of intergenerational relationships in the context of rapid aging and healthy longevity between Mainland China and Taiwan is possible. At each wave, the longitudinal survivors were re-interviewed, and the deceased interviewees were replaced by additional participants. Data on mortality and health status before dying for the 12,136 elders aged 65-112 who died between the waves were collected in interviews with a close family member of the deceased. The study also included interviews and follow-ups with 4,478 elderly interviewees'''' children aged 35-65. * Dates of Study: 1998-2005 * Study Features: Longitudinal, International * Sample Size: ** 1998: 8,993 ** 2000: 11,199 ** 2002: 16,064 ** 2005: 14,923 Links * Data Archive, http://www.geri.duke.edu/china_study/CLHLS6.htm * ICPSR, http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/studies/03891

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Cite this (Cross-National Equivalent Files, RRID:SCR_008935)

URL: http://cnef.ehe.osu.edu/#sthash.WuGubz1D.dpuf

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

A dataset, 1970-2009, containing equivalently defined variables for the British Household Panel Study (BHPS), the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA), the Korea Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS) (new this year), the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS-HSE) (new this year), the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID), and the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). The data are designed to allow cross-national researchers not experienced in panel data analysis to access a simplified version of these panels, while providing experienced panel data users with guidelines for formulating equivalent variables across countries. The CNEF permit researchers to track yearly changes in the health and economic well-being of older people relative to younger people in the study countries. The equivalent file provides a set of constructed variables (for example pre- and post-government income and United States and international household equivalence weights) that are not directly available on the original surveys. Since the Cross-National Equivalent File 1970-2009 can be merged with the original surveys, PSID-CNEF users can easily incorporate these constructed variables into current analyses. The most recent release of the Equivalent File includes: * BHPS data from 1991 to 2005 on over 21,000 individuals and approximately 6,000 households. * GSOEP data from 1984 to 2007 on over 20,000 individuals and approximately 6,000 households in Germany. * HILDA data from 2001 to 2006 on over 19,000 individuals and 7,000 households. * PSID data from 1980 to 2005 on over 33,000 individuals and approximately 7,000 households. * SHP data from 1999 to 2006 on 12,900 individuals and 5,000 households. * SLID data from 1993 to 2006 on over 95,000 individuals and approximately 32,000 households. With one exception, the CNEF country data are available on CD-ROM from Cornell University for a fee. The Canadian SLID data are not distributed on the CD but are available to CNEF registered researchers through special arrangements with Statistics Canada. Complete instructions for obtaining CNEF data may be accessed on the project website. * Dates of Study: 1980-2007 * Study Features: International, Longitudinal * Sample Size: ** BHPS: 21,000+ ** PSID: 33,000+ ** SLID: 95,000+ ** GSOEP: 20,000+ ** HILDA: 19,000+ ** SHP: 12,900+ NACDA link: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/studies/00145/detail

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Cite this (Longitudinal Study of Elderly Mexican American Health, RRID:SCR_008941)

URL: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:srOrfTsktEsJ:https://portal.utpa.edu/portal/page/portal/80C547C751AC1698E04400306EF397E0+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

A dataset of a longitudinal study of over 3,000 Mexican-Americans aged 65 or over living in five southwestern states. The objective is to describe the physical and mental health of the study group and link them to key social variables (e.g., social support, health behavior, acculturation, migration). To the extent possible, the study was modeled after the existing EPESE studies, especially the Duke EPESE, which included a large sample if African-Americans. Unlike the other EPESE studies that were restricted to small geographic areas, the Hispanic EPESE aimed at obtaining a representative sample of community-dwelling Mexican-American elderly residing in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and California. Approximately 85% of Mexican-American elderly reside in these states and data were obtained that are generalizable to roughly 500,000 older people. The final sample of 3,050 subjects at baseline is comparable to those of the other EPESE studies. Data Availability: Waves I to IV are available through the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA), ICPSR. Also available through NACDA is the ??????Resource Book of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly?????? which offers a thorough review of the data and its applications. All subjects aged 75 or older were interviewed for Wave V and 902 new subjects were added. Hemoglobin A1c test kits were provided to subjects who self-reported diabetes. Approximately 270 of the kits were returned for analyses. Wave V data are being validated and reviewed. A tentative timeline for the archiving of Wave V data is November 2006. Wave VI interviewing and data collection is scheduled to begin in Fall 2006. * Dates of Study: 1993-2006 * Study Features: Longitudinal, Minority oversamples, Anthropometric Measures * Sample Size: ** 1993-4: 3,050 (Wave I) ** 1995-6: 2,438 (Wave II) ** 1998-9: 1,980 (Wave III) ** 2000-1: 1,682 (Wave IV) ** 2004-5: 2,073 (Wave V) ** 2006-7: (Wave VI) Links: * ICPSR Wave 1: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/2851 * ICPSR Wave 2: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/3385 * ICPSR Wave 3: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/4102 * ICPSR Wave 4: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/4314 * ICPSR Wave 5: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/25041 * ICPSR Wave 6: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/29654

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Cite this (Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey, RRID:SCR_008923)

URL: http://lasurvey.rand.org/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, biomaterial supply resource, material resource, data or information resource

A dataset of a panel study of a representative sample of all neighborhoods and households in Los Angeles County, with poor neighborhoods and families with children oversampled, for investigating the social and economic determinants of health and race and ethnic disparities. The study follows neighborhoods over time, as well as children and families. Two waves have been conducted to date, in 2000-2001 (L.A.FANS 1) and again beginning in 2006 through early 2009 (L.A. FANS 2). L.A.FANS-2 will significantly enhance the utility of the L.A.FANS data for studies of adult health disparities by: 1) Replicating self-reported health measures from L.A.FANS-1 and collecting new self-reports on treatment, health behaviors, functional limitations, quality and quantity of sleep, anxiety, health status vignettes, and changes in health status since the first interview; 2) Collecting physiological markers of disease and health status, including diabetes, hypertension, obesity, lung function, immune function, and cardiovascular disease; and 3) Expanding the data collected on adults'' work conditions, stressful experiences, and social ties. Wherever possible, L.A.FANS uses well-tested questions or sections from national surveys, such as the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS), and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and other urban surveys, such as the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, to facilitate comparisons. Data Availability: Public use data, study design, and questionnaire content from L.A.FANS are available for downloading. Researchers can also apply for a restricted use version of the L.A.FANS-1 data that contain considerable contextual and geographically-referenced information. Application procedures are described at the project Website. L.A.FANS-2 fieldwork was completed at the end of 2008. The PIs anticipate L.A.FANS-2 public use data will be released in summer 2009. * Dates of Study: 2000-2008 * Study Features: Longitudinal, Minority Oversamples, Anthropometric Measures, Biospecimens * Sample Size: ** 2000-1: 2,548 (L.A.FANS 1) ** 2006-8: ~3,600 (L.A.FANS 2) Link: * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/00172

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Cite this (Luxembourg Income Study, RRID:SCR_008732)

URL: http://www.lisdatacenter.org/

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

A cross-national data archive located in Luxembourg that contains two primary databases: the Luxembourg Income Study Database (LIS Database) includes income microdata from a large number of countries at multiple points in time. The newer Luxembourg Wealth Study Database(LWS Database) includes wealth microdata from a smaller selection of countries. Both databases include labor market and demographic data as well. Our mission is to enable, facilitate, promote, and conduct cross-national comparative research on socio-economic outcomes and on the institutional factors that shape those outcomes. Since its beginning in 1983, the LIS has grown into a cooperative research project with a membership that includes countries in Europe, North America, and Australia. The database now contains information for more than 30 countries with datasets that span up to three decades. The LIS databank has a total of over 140 datasets covering the period 1968 to 2005. The primary objectives of the LIS are as follows: * Test the feasibility for creating a database containing social and economic data collected in household surveys from different countries; * Provide a method which allows researchers to use the data under restrictions required by the countries providing the data; * Create a system that allows research requests to be received from and returned to users at remote locations; and * Promote comparative research on the social and economic status of various populations and subgroups in different countries. Data Availability: The dataset is accessed globally via electronic mail networks. Extensive documentation concerning technical aspects of the survey data, variables list, and the social institutions of income provision in member countries are also available to users through the project Website. * Dates of Study: 1968-present * Study Features: International * Sample Size: 30+ Countries Link: * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/00150

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Cite this (Matlab Health and Socio-Economic Survey, RRID:SCR_008942)

URL: http://www.rand.org/labor/FLS/MHSS.html

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

A data set of the health and socioeconomic factors that affect the elderly in Matlab, a region of rural Bangladesh. The survey captures measurements and statistics such as adult survival, health status, health care utilization, resource flows between generations and the impact of community services and infrastructure on adult health care. Data was collected through surveys that touch on four topics: household and individual information; determinants of natural fertility; migration out of the community; and community and provider survey of healthcare and education infrastructure.

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Cite this (Mexican Health and Aging Study, RRID:SCR_000818)

URL: http://www.mhasweb.org/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, biomaterial supply resource, material resource, data or information resource

A dataset of a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico. The study was designed to ensure comparability with the U.S. Health and Retirement Study in many domains, and the NHANES III. The baseline survey in 2001 is nationally representative of the 13 million Mexicans born prior to 1951. The six Mexican states which are home to 40% of all migrants to the U.S. were over-sampled at a rate of 1.7:1. Spouse/partners of eligible respondents were interviewed also, even if the spouse was born after 1950. Completed interviews were obtained in 9,862 households, for a total of 15,186 individual interviews. All interviews were face-to-face, with average duration of 82 minutes. A direct interview (on the Basic questionnaire) was sought, and Proxy interviews were obtained when poor health or temporary absence precluded a direct interview. Questionnaire topics included the following: * HEALTH MEASURES: self-reports of conditions, symptoms, functional status, hygienic behaviors (e.g., smoking & drinking history), use/source/costs of health care services, depression, pain, reading and cognitive performance; * BACKGROUND: Childhood health and living conditions, education, ability to read/write and count, migration history, marital history; * FAMILY: rosters of all children (including deceased children); for each, demographic attributes, summary indicators of childhood and current health, education, current work status, migration. Parent and sibling migration experiences; * TRANSFERS: financial and time help given to and received by respondent from children, indexed to specific child; time and financial help to parent; * ECONOMIC: sources and amounts of income, including wages, pensions, and government subsidies; type and value of assets. All amount variables are bracketed in case of non-response. * HOUSING ENVIRONMENT: type, location, building materials, other indicators of quality, and ownership of consumer durables; * ANTHROPOMETRIC: for a 20% sub-sample, measured weight, height; waist, hip, and calf circumference; knee height, and timed one-leg stands. Current plans are to conduct another two follow-up surveys in 2012 and 2014 and will field the 3rd and 4th waves of survey data collection in Mexico. For the 2012 wave, interviews will be sought for: every person who was part of the panel in 2003 and their new spouse / partner, if applicable, and a new sample of persons born between 1952 and 1962. For the 2014 wave, we will follow-up the whole sample from 2012. Interviews will be conducted person-to-person. Direct interviews will be sought with all informants, but proxy interviews are allowed for those unable to complete their own interview for health or cognitive reasons. A next-of-kin interview will be completed with a knowledgeable respondent for those who were part of the panel but have died since the last interview. A sub-sample will be selected to obtain objective markers such as blood sample and anthropometric measures. Data Availability: The 2001 baseline data, 2003 follow-up data, and documentation can be downloaded. * Dates of Study: 2001-2003 * Study Features: Longitudinal, International, Anthropometric Measures * Sample Size: 2001: 15,186 (Baseline) Link: * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/00142

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Cite this (National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, RRID:SCR_008947)

URL: http://www.nlsinfo.org/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

A dataset that permits examination of health, economic, work, and retirement trajectories for a representative national sample of men from middle to old age. The original sample of 5,020 men, first interviewed in 1966, was re-interviewed periodically until 1983 under a contract with the US Department of Labor. The study provided a detailed longitudinal record of their labor market activity, health, financial status, family structure, and attitudes toward and experience in retirement. The NIA grant made possible a re-interview in 1990 with the surviving men and the widows (or other next-of-kin) of the decedents. The merging of the 1990 data includes death certificate information for the decedents, Blacks were over-represented in the original sample in a ratio of about three or four to one, resulting in about 500 surviving black men in the sample. Information on labor market activity, income, and assets also is available for a sample of about 1,350 widows, 90 percent of whom are between 60 and 89 years of age. This information can be linked to earlier data on the women''s health and work activity that was reported by their late husbands. Due to the original sample selection, other NLS cohorts contain wives and daughters of the older men. These other surveys also hold a wealth of detailed information on aging and retirement issues, especially on income transfers. * Dates of Study: 1966-1990 * Study Features: Longitudinal, Minority Oversamples * Sample Size: ** 1966: 5,020 men (baseline) ** 1990: 2,092 surviving men, 1,341 widows, 865 other next-of-kin Links: * BLS Website on NLS: http://www.bls.gov/nls/ * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/04675

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Cite this (National Survey of Families and Households, RRID:SCR_013388)

URL: http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/nsfh/home.htm

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

A national sample survey dataset covering a wide variety of issues on American family life beginning in 1987-88 and at two subsequent timepoints1992-93 and 2001-03. Topics covered included detailed household composition, family background, adult family transitions, couple interactions, parent-child interactions, education and work, health, economic and psychological well-being, and family attitudes. The first wave interviewed 13,017 respondents, including a main cross-section sample of 9,643 persons aged 19 and over plus an oversample of minorities and households containing single-parent families, step-families, recently married couples, and cohabiting couples. In each household, a randomly selected adult was interviewed. In addition, a shorter, self-administered questionnaire was filled out by the spouse or cohabiting partner of the primary respondent. Interviews averaged about 100 minutes, although interview length varied considerably with the complexity of the respondent''s family history. In 1992-94, an in-person interview was conducted of all surviving members of the original sample, the current spouse or cohabiting partner, and with the baseline spouse or partner in cases where the relationship had ended. Telephone interviews were conducted with focal children who were aged 5-12 and 13-18 at baseline. Short proxy interviews were conducted with a surviving spouse or other relative in cases where the original respondent died or was too ill to interview. A telephone interview was conducted with one randomly selected parent of the main respondent. In 2001-03, telephone interviews were conducted with: Surviving members of the original respondents who had a focal child age 5 or over at baseline; the baseline spouse/partner of these original respondents, whether or not the couple was still together; the focal children who were in the household and aged 5-18 at baselinemost of whom were interviewed at wave 2; and all other original respondents age 45 or older in 2000, and their baseline spouse/partner. Oversamples: Blacks, 9.2%; Mexican-Americans, 2.4%; Puerto Ricans, 0.7% * Dates of Study: 1987-2003 * Study Features: Longitudinal, Minority Oversampling * Sample Size (original respondents): ** Wave I (1987-88): 13,017 ** Wave II (1992-93): 10,007 ** Wave III (2001-03): 8,990 Links: * Wave I (ICPSR): http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06041 * Wave II (ICPSR): http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06906 * Wave III (ICPSR): http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/00171

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Cite this (National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States, RRID:SCR_008972)

URL: http://www.midus.wisc.edu/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Data set from a collaborative, interdisciplinary investigation of patterns, predictors, and consequences of midlife development in the areas of physical health, psychological well-being, and social responsibility. Respondents were asked to provide extensive information on their physical and mental health throughout their adult lives, and to assess the ways in which their lifestyles, including relationships and work-related demands, contributed to the conditions experienced. An additional series of questions focusing on childhood queried respondents regarding the presence/absence of their parents, religion, rules/punishments, love/affection, physical/verbal abuse, and the quality of their relationships with their parents and siblings. Respondents were drawn from a nationally representative random-digit-dial sample of non-institutionalized, English-speaking adults, aged 25-74, selected from working telephone banks in the coterminous United States. Those queried participated in an initial telephone interview and responded to a mail questionnaire. MIDUS 2 carried forward MIDUS 1 and enlisted a new sample of African Americans. MIDUS2 also expanded the focus by incorporating detailed neurophysiological assessments on a large subsample in three geographic regions. Data collection largely repeats T1 assessments (45 minute phone interview, 100 page self-administered questionnaire) plus additions in select areas (e.g., cognitive functioning, optimism and coping, life events, caregiving). In addition, MIDUS 2 is using diary techniques to assess daily stressors in a subsample of respondents; conducting cognitive testing through telephone interviews; collecting biological data on a subsample of respondents, including baseline biomarkers as well as laboratory challenge studies, with assessments of salivary cortisol, blood pressure, and heart rate variability; and collecting EEG measures to focus on the central circuitry of emotion, related to affect and depression. Siblings and Twins: Similar data were collected from a survey of 951 siblings of a respondent in the main survey. MIDUS also contains twins data, from a separate national survey unrelated to the main MIDUS survey. From this separate national survey, a total of 1,996 twins agreed to participate. The Twins respondents were given the same assessments as the Main and Siblings samples. Additionally, the Twins sample was asked a series of questions about their birth, shared physical characteristics, childhood and adult relationships with their twin, whether they were dressed alike as children, and whether others experienced difficulty identifying them correctly. Data and comprehensive documentation for MIDUS 1 and 2 are available via ICPSR. * Dates of Study: 1995-2008 * Study Features: Longitudinal, Minority Oversampling, Anthropometric Measures * Sample Size: ** 1995-6: 4,242 (MIDUS 1) ** 2004-6: 7,108 (MIDUS 2) Links: * ICPSR ?????? MIDUS 1: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/02760 * ICPSR ?????? MIDUS 2: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/04652

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Cite this (New Immigrant Survey, RRID:SCR_008973)

URL: http://nis.princeton.edu/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Public use data set on new legal immigrants to the U.S. that can address scientific and policy questions about migration behavior and the impacts of migration. A survey pilot project, the NIS-P, was carried out in 1996 to inform the fielding and design of the full NIS. Baseline interviews were ultimately conducted with 1,127 adult immigrants. Sample members were interviewed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months, with half of the sample also interviewed at three months. The first full cohort, NIS-2003, is based on a nationally representative sample of the electronic administrative records compiled for new immigrants by the US government. NIS-2003 sampled immigrants in the period May-November 2003. The geographic sampling design takes advantage of the natural clustering of immigrants. It includes all top 85 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and all top 38 counties, plus a random sample of other MSAs and counties. Interviews were conducted in respondents'' preferred languages. The baseline was multi-modal: 60% of adult interviews were administered by telephone; 40% were in-person. The baseline round was in the field from June 2003 to June 2004, and includes in the Adult Sample 8,573 respondents, 4,336 spouses, and 1,072 children aged 8-12. A follow-up was planned for 2007. Several modules of the NIS were designed to replicate sections of the continuing surveys of the US population that provide a natural comparison group. Questionnaire topics include Health (self-reports of conditions, symptoms, functional status, smoking and drinking history) and use/source/costs of health care services, depression, pain; background; (2) Background: Childhood history and living conditions, education, migration history, marital history, military history, fertility history, language skills, employment history in the US and foreign countries, social networks, religion; Family: Rosters of all children; for each, demographic attributes, education, current work status, migration, marital status and children; for some, summary indicators of childhood and current health, language ability; Economic: Sources and amounts of income, including wages, pensions, and government subsidies; type, value of assets and debts, financial assistance given/received to/from respondent from/to relatives, friends, employer, type of housing and ownership of consumable durables. * Dates of Study: 2003-2007 * Study Features: Longitudinal * Sample Size: 13,981

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Cite this (Panel Study of Income Dynamics, RRID:SCR_008976)

URL: http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Long-term longitudinal dataset with information on generational links and socioeconomic and health conditions of individuals over time. The central foci of the data are economic and demographic, with substantial detail on income sources and amounts, wealth, savings, employment, pensions, family composition changes, childbirth and marriage histories, and residential location. Over the life of the PSID, the NIA has funded supplements on wealth, health, parental health and long term care, housing, and the financial impact of illness, thus also making it possible to model retirement and residential mobility. Starting in 1999, much greater detail on specific health conditions and health care expenses is included for respondent and spouse. Other enhancements have included a question series about emotional distress (2001); the two stem questions from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to assess symptoms of major depression (2003); a supplement on philanthropic giving and volunteering (2001-03); a question series on Internet and computer use (2003); linkage to the National Death Index with cause of death information for more than 4,000 individuals through the 1997 wave, updated for each subsequent wave; social and family history variables and GIS-linked environmental data; basic data on pension plans; event history calendar methodology to facilitate recall of employment spells (2001). The reporting unit is the family: single person living alone or sharing a household with other non-relatives; group of people related by blood, marriage, or adoption; unmarried couple living together in what appears to be a fairly permanent arrangement. Interviews were conducted annually from 1968 through 1997; biennial interviewing began in 1999. There is an oversample of Blacks (30%). Waves 1990 through 1995 included a 20% Hispanic oversample; within the Hispanic oversample, Cubans and Puerto Ricans were oversampled relative to Mexicans. All data from 1994 through 2001 are available as public release files; prior waves can be obtained in archive versions. The special files with weights for families are also available. Restricted files include the Geocode Match File with information for 1968 through 2001, the 1968-2001 Death File, and the 1991 Medicare Claims File. * Dates of Study: 1968-2003 * Study Features: Longitudinal, Minority Oversampling * Sample Size: 65,000+ Links * ICPSR Series: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/series/00131 * ICPSR 1968-1999: Annual Core Data: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/07439 * ICPSR 1968-1999: Supplemental Files: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/03202 * ICPSR 1989-1990: Latino Sample: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/03203

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Cite this (Precursors of Premature Disease and Death, RRID:SCR_010483)

URL: http://wwwcf.nlm.nih.gov/hsrr_search/view_hsrr_record_table.cfm?TITLE_ID=479&PROGRAM_CAME=toc_with_source2.cfm

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Data set of annual questionnaires of a long-term prospective study of 1,337 former Johns Hopkins University medical students to identify precursors of premature cardiovascular disease and hypertension. The purpose of the study has broadened, however, as the cohort has aged. The study has been funded for 15 years. Participants were an average of 22 years of age at entry and have been followed to an average age of 69 years. Data are collected through annual questionnaires, supplemented with phone calls and substudies. Self-reports of diseases and risk factors have been validated. Every year from 1988 to 2003, anywhere from 2 to 6 questionnaires have been administered, in categories such as the following, which repeat periodically: Morbidity, Supplemental Illness, Health Behavior, Family and Career, Retirement, Job Satisfaction, Blood Pressure and Weight, Medications, Work Environment, Social Network, Diabetes, Osteoarthritis, Health Locus of Control, Preventive Health Services, General Health, Functional Limitations, Memory Functioning, Smoking, Religious Beliefs and Practices, Links with Administrative Data, National Death Index searches for all nonrespondents * Dates of Study: 1946-2003 * Study Features: Longitudinal * Sample Size: 1,337 (1946)

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Cite this (Resources for Enhancing Alzheimers Caregiver Health, RRID:SCR_003638)

URL: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/03253

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Data set from six research sites that examined the feasibility and outcomes of the most promising home and community-based intervention approaches for enhancing family caregiving for Alzheimers Disease (AD) and related disorders (ADRD). A unique feature is the examination of AD burdens and interventions in three ethnic groups (Caucasians, Hispanics, and African Americans). Caregiver/care recipient dyads are entered into the study using standardized eligibility criteria. The dyads are randomized at each intervention site using site-specific procedures. Standardized assessment batteries are administered at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. The five general types of REACH interventions are: Individual Information and Support strategies that increase caregivers' understanding of dementia and their particular caregiving situation; Group Support and Family Systems efforts that provide caregivers with multiple forms of social support; Psychoeducational and Skill-Based Training approaches that teach caregivers coping and behavioral management strategies; Home-Based Environmental interventions that modify the home environment's effect on the care recipient and support the caregiver; and Enhanced Technology Systems such as home-centered computer/telephone networks that are designed to reduce caregiver distress and isolation. REACH II was funded in 2001 to test a single multi-component intervention among family caregivers of persons with ADRD, building upon the findings of REACH. Recruitment for REACH II was completed in January 2004 with 642 participants entering the study across 5 participating sites.

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Cite this (Second Malaysian Family Life Survey, RRID:SCR_008892)

URL: http://www.rand.org/labor/FLS/MFLS.html

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

A follow-up of the 1976-1977 MFLS-1 dataset covering the respondents'' and spouses'' marriage, fertility, employment, education and migration histories as well as extensive information on the household economy. The MFLS-2 contains a supplementary sample of persons age 50 or older. The data permit analysis of intergenerational transfers to the elderly and their covariates; the living arrangements of the elderly; the health of the elderly; labor supply, occupation and retirement status of the elderly; and their migration patterns. This supplement fills the gap left by many standard sources of demographic and economic information about Third World populations, such as fertility surveys and labor force surveys, which effectively exclude the elderly. Field work for MFLS-2 began in Aug. 1988 and was completed in Jan. 1989. The survey was fielded in four samples: * The Panel Sample Women who were the primary respondents to the MFLS-1, who at that time (1976) were ever-married women aged 50 or younger. There are 926 panel households in MFLS-2, a follow-up rate of 72%. * The Children Sample Children aged 18 or older in 1988 of the women interviewed as primary respondents for MFLS-1; i.e. adult children of the women eligible for the MFLS-2 Panel sample. There were interviews with one child, selected at random, inside the Panel household and two children, selected at random, living elsewhere in Peninsular Malaysia. There are 1,136 respondents in the Children sample. * The New Sample A sample of households with a woman aged 18-49 (regardless of her marital status) or an ever-married woman under age 18. There are 2,184 respondents in MFLS-2 New Sample. * The Senior Sample Selected households with a person age 50 or over. There are 1,357 respondents in the Senior Sample. Data Availability: The MFLS-2 (and MFLS-1) data files and documentation are available on-line or from NACDA at ICPSR as Study No. 9805. * Dates of Study: 1988-1989 * Study Features: International * Sample Size: Seniors (aged 50+): 1,357 Link: * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/09805

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