Searching across hundreds of databases

Our searching services are busy right now. Your search will reload in five seconds.

  • Register
X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

X

Leaving Community

Are you sure you want to leave this community? Leaving the community will revoke any permissions you have been granted in this community.

No
Yes
X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

Search

Type in a keyword to search

on page 1 showing 16 out of 16 results

Cite this (Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study, RRID:SCR_008254)

URL: http://www.adcs.org/

Resource Type: Resource, disease-related portal, topical portal, assessment test provider, biomaterial supply resource, tissue bank, portal, material resource, data or information resource

An initiative for Alzheimer's disease clinical studies that works to facilitate the discovery, development and testing of new drugs, and is a part of the Alzheimer's Disease Prevention Initiative. This resource has an emphasis on expanding the range of its patients, mainly by enhancing the recruitment of minority groups. There is a further emphasis placed on testing agents that cannot be patented, as well as developing novel compounds that had been developed by individuals, academic institutions and drug discovery units. This resource also helps in the development of Alzheimer's disease centers to carry out studies, as well as establish administrative, data, operations and medical cores in San Diego. This organization is specifically involved in studies demonstrating the lack of benefit associated, previously used treatments such as: the use of estrogen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, B vitamins and a statin drug. The Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study also develops assessment instruments to be used in clinical trials. The most frequently used of these tools include: the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive sub-scale (ADAS-cog), Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and the Clinical Global Impression of Change Scale (CGIC). There is also an associated tissue bank at UCSD that includes materials from the clinical trials including: human tissue, blood, plasma, DNA, urine and cerebrospinal fluid.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Brain Research Institute Biobank Resources, RRID:SCR_008756)

URL: http://www.bri.ucla.edu/research/resources

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial supply resource, image collection, tissue bank, brain bank, material resource, data or information resource

Brain bank resources which include postmortem human frozen brain tissue and matched cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood available for scientists to search for etiopathogeneses of human disease. The National Neurological Research Specimen Bank and the Multiple Sclerosis Human Neurospecimen Bank maintains a collection of quick frozen and formalin fixed postmortem human brain tissue and frozen cerebrospinal fluid from patients with neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's Disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, depressive disorder/suicide, and epilepsy, among others. Diagnoses are documented by clinical medical records and gross/microscopic neuropathology. The Neuropathology Laboratory at the UCLA Medical Center maintains a bank of frozen, formalin and paraformaldehyde-fixed and paraffin-embedded postmortem human brain tissues and frozen cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients who die with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing and degenerative illnesses, as well as control materials removed in a similar fashion from patients who are neurologically normal.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (DIAN - Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network, RRID:SCR_000812)

URL: http://www.dian-info.org/default.htm

Resource Type: Resource, disease-related portal, topical portal, database, biomaterial supply resource, tissue bank, portal, brain bank, material resource, data or information resource

An international research partnership of leading scientists determined to understand a rare form of Alzheimers disease that is caused by a gene mutation and to establish a research database and tissue repository to support research on Alzheimers disease by other investigators around the world. One goal of DIAN is to study possible brain changes that occur before Alzheimers disease is expressed in people who carry an Alzheimers disease mutation. Other family members without a mutation will serve as a comparison group. People in families in which a mutation has been identified will be tracked in order to detect physical or mental changes that might distinguish people who inherited the mutation from those who did not. DIAN currently involves eleven outstanding research institutions in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. John C. Morris, M.D., Friedman Distinguished Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is the principal investigator of the project.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Dynamics of Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC), RRID:SCR_008813)

URL: http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/intramural-research-program/dynamics-health-aging-and-body-composition-health-abc

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial supply resource, topical portal, portal, material resource, data or information resource

A study that characterizes the extent of change in body composition in older men and women, identifies clinical conditions accelerating these changes, and examines the health impact of these changes on strength, endurance, disability, and weight-related diseases of old age. The study population consists of 3,075 persons age 70-79 at baseline with about equal numbers of men and women. Thirty-three percent of the men are African-Americans as are 46% of the women. All persons in the study were selected to be free of disability in activities of daily living and free of functional limitation (defined as any difficulty walking a quarter of a mile or any difficulty walking up 10 steps without resting) at baseline. The core yearly examination for HEALTH ABC includes measurement of body composition by dual energy x-ray absorptio????????metry (DXA), walking ability, strength, an interview that includes self-report of limitations, a medication survey, and weight (Measurements in the Health ABC Study). Provision has been made for banking of blood specimens and extracted DNA (HealthABC repository). Study investigators are open to collaboration especially for measures focused on obesity and associated weight-related health conditions including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, pulmonary function, cardiovascular disease, vascular disease, diabetes and glucose intolerance, and depression. The principal goals of the HEALTH ABC are: # To assess the association of baseline body weight, lean body mass, body fat, and bone mineral content, in relation to weight history, with: incident functional limitation; incidence and change in severity of weight-related health conditions; recovery of physical function after an acute event; baseline measures of strength, fitness and physical performance; gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status # To access the contribution of episodes of severe acute illness in healthier older persons to changes in body weight, bone mineral content, lean body mass and body fat, and the relationship of these episodes to risk of functional limitation and recovery. # To assess the impact of weight-related co-morbid illness on the risk of functional limitation and recovery. # To assess the ways in which physiologic mediators of change in body composition influence and are influenced by changes in health in older adults and contribute to change in body composition; to understand how changes in body composition affect weight-related cardiovascular disease risk factors such as lipids, blood pressure and glucose tolerance. # To assess the interdependency of behavioral factors, such as nutrition and physical activity, co-morbid health conditions, and their association with change in body composition in old age. # To provide a firm scientific basis for understanding issues related to weight recommendations in old age through increased knowledge of the potential trade-offs between weight and risk of functional limitation, disability, morbidity and death; to provide information critical for developing effective strategies for the maintenance of health in older persons.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, RRID:SCR_006727)

URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/ELSA

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

An interdisciplinary data resource on health, economic position and quality of life as people age. Longitudinal multidisciplinary data from a representative sample of the English population aged 50 and older have been collected. Both objective and subjective data are collected relating to health and disability, biological markers of disease, economic circumstance, social participation, networks and well-being. Participants are surveyed every two years to see how people''s health, economic and social circumstances may change over time. One of the study''s aims is to determine the relationships between functioning and health, social networks, resources and economic position as people plan for, move into and progress beyond retirement. It is patterned after the Health and Retirement Study, a similar study based in the United States. ELSA''s method of data collection includes face-to-face interview with respondents aged 50+; self-completion; and clinical, physical, and performance measurements (e.g., timed walk). Wave 2 added questions about quality of health care, literacy, and household consumption, and a visit by a nurse to obtain anthropometric, blood pressure, and lung function measurements, as well as saliva and blood samples, and to record results from tests of balance and muscle strength. Another new aspect of Wave 2 is the ''Exit Interview'' carried out with proxy informants to collect data about respondents who have died since Wave 1. This interview includes questions about the respondents'' physical and psychological health, the care and support they received, their memory and mood in the last year of their life, and details of what has happened to their finances after their death. Wave 3 data added questions related to mortgages and pensions. The intention is to conduct interviews every 2 years, and to have a nurse visit every 4 years. It also is envisioned that the ELSA data will ultimately be linked to available administrative data, such as death registry data, a cancer register, NHS hospital episodes data, National Insurance contributions, benefits, and tax credit records. The survey data are designed to be used for the investigation of a broad set of topics relevant to understanding the aging process. These include: * health trajectories, disability and healthy life expectancy; * the determinants of economic position in older age; * the links between economic position, physical health, cognition and mental health; * the nature and timing of retirement and post-retirement labour market activity; * household and family structure, social networks and social supports; * patterns, determinants and consequences of social, civic and cultural participation; * predictors of well-being. Current funding for ELSA will extend the panel to 12 years of study, giving significant potential for longitudinal analyses to examine causal processes. * Dates of Study: 2002-2007 * Study Features: Longitudinal, International, Anthropometric Measures * Sample Size: ** 2000-2003 (Wave 1): 12,100 ** 2004-2005 (Wave 2): 9,433 ** 2006-2007 (Wave 3): 9,771 ** 2008-2009 (Wave 4): underway Links * Economic and Social Data Service (ESDS): http://www.esds.ac.uk/longitudinal/about/overview.asp * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/00139#scope-of-study

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Indonesia Family Life Survey, RRID:SCR_005695)

URL: http://www.rand.org/labor/FLS/IFLS.html

Resource Type: Resource, data set, biomaterial supply resource, material resource, data or information resource

A dataset of an on-going multi-level longitudinal survey in Indonesia that collects extensive information on socio-economic and demographic characteristics of respondents, as well as extremely comprehensive interviews with local leaders about community services and facilities. The survey is ideally suited for research on topics related to important dynamic aging processes such as the transition from self-sufficiency to dependency, the decline from robust health to frailty, labor force and earning dynamics, wealth accumulation and decumulation, living arrangements and intergenerational transfers. The first wave of IFLS was fielded in 1993 and collected information on over 30,000 individuals living in 7,200 households. The sample covers 321 communities in 13 provinces in Indonesia and is representative of about 83% of the population. These households were revisited in 1997 (IFLS2), 2000 (IFLS3), and 2007-8 (IFLS4). A 25% sub-sample of households was re-interviewed in 1998 (IFLS2+). Special attention is paid to the measurement of health, including the measurement of anthropometry, blood pressure, lung capacity, a mobility test and collection of dry blood spots by a nurse or doctor. In addition to comprehensive life history data on education, work, migration, marriage and child bearing, the survey collects very detailed information on economic status of individuals and households. Links with non co-resident family members are spelled out in conjunction with information on borrowing and transfers. Information is gathered on participation in community activities and in public assistance programs. Measurement of health is a major focus of the survey. In addition to detailed information about use of private and public health services along with insurance status, respondents provide a self-reported assessment of health status. Detailed information on the local economy and prices of goods and services are also collected. These data may be matched with the individual and household-level data. Considerable attention has been placed on minimizing attrition in IFLS. In each re-survey, about 95% of households have been re-contacted. Around 10-15% of respondents have moved from the location in which they were interviewed in the previous wave. In addition, individuals who split-off from the original households have been followed. They have added around 1,000 households to the sample in 1997 and about 3,000 households in 2000. Data Availability: IFLS1 data are available through ICPSR as study number 6706. Data from subsequent waves of the IFLS can be accessed from the RAND project Website. * Dates of Study: 1993-2008 * Study Features: Longitudinal, International, Anthropometric Measures, Biomarkers * Sample Size: ** 1993: 22,000 (IFLS1) ** 1997: 33,000 (IFLS2) ** 1998: 10,000 (IFLS2+) ** 2000: 37,000 (IFLS3) ** 2008: 44,103 (IFLS4) Links: * IFLS1 ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/06706 * IFLS ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/00184

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Iowa 65+ Rural Health Study, RRID:SCR_008937)

URL: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/studies/09915/version/3

Resource Type: Resource, data set, biomaterial supply resource, material resource, data or information resource

A data set and sister study to the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (EPESE). It complements the findings of the three other EPESE sites (East Boston, MA; New Haven, CT; and north-central North Carolina) and has common items and methods in many domains. The target population was all persons 65 years and older in two rural counties in east central Iowa: Iowa and Washington counties. In 1981 a census of older persons in the target area was conducted by the investigators, creating an ascertainment list having 99% of the persons identified in the previous year by the US Decennial Census. The baseline survey was conducted between December 1991 and August 1992. Overall, 3,673 persons, or 80% of the target population were interviewed: 65-69 (N = 986), 70-74 (N = 988), 75-79 (N = 815), 80-84 (N = 523), and 85+ (N = 361). The population is virtually entirely Caucasian. Subsequently, personal follow-up surveys were conducted 3, 6, and 10 years after the baseline survey. Telephone surveys were conducted 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7 years after the baseline survey. Data collected from respondents included information about demographics, major health conditions, health care utilization, hearing and vision, weight and height, elements of nutrition, sleep problems, depressive and anxiety symptoms, alcohol and tobacco use, cognitive performance and dementia screening, incontinence measures, life satisfaction index, social networks and support, worries, medication use, activities of daily living, dental problems, satisfaction with medical care, life events, brief economic status, automobile driving habits, multiple measures of physical and disability status, and blood pressure. At follow-up #6, there were a series of physical function performance tests, the so-called NIA-MacArthur Battery, and blood was drawn for biochemical tests and potentially other determinations. In addition, some datasets were linked to the EPESE dataset under appropriate restrictions, including Iowa state driving records and clinical diagnoses and medical care utilization from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Data Availability: The dataset has been shared with several investigative teams under special arrangement with the Principal Investigator. Early surveys are available from ICPSR. A small storage of blood is available for exploratory analyses. * Dates of Study: 1991-2001 * Study Features: Longitudinal, Anthropometric Measures, Biomarkers * Sample Size: 1991-2: 3,673 (baseline) Link: EPESE 1981-93 ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/09915

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Johns Hopkins Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, RRID:SCR_008757)

URL: http://www.alzresearch.org/index.cfm

Resource Type: Resource, disease-related portal, topical portal, training resource, biomaterial supply resource, tissue bank, brain bank, portal, material resource, data or information resource

A Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) whose goal is to conduct basic and clinical research aimed at understanding Alzheimer's disease. The Center enrolls a variety of individuals for clinical trials, evaluation and follow-up, including: normal control subjects, individuals with mild memory problems, and patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease or related dementias. Researchers can request data and specimens obtained from ADRC subjects. These include blood or DNA, brain specimens, and cross-sectional or longitudinal clinical and cognitive data, all from ADRC subjects.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Mexican Health and Aging Study, RRID:SCR_000818)

URL: http://www.mhasweb.org/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, biomaterial supply resource, material resource, data or information resource

A dataset of a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico. The study was designed to ensure comparability with the U.S. Health and Retirement Study in many domains, and the NHANES III. The baseline survey in 2001 is nationally representative of the 13 million Mexicans born prior to 1951. The six Mexican states which are home to 40% of all migrants to the U.S. were over-sampled at a rate of 1.7:1. Spouse/partners of eligible respondents were interviewed also, even if the spouse was born after 1950. Completed interviews were obtained in 9,862 households, for a total of 15,186 individual interviews. All interviews were face-to-face, with average duration of 82 minutes. A direct interview (on the Basic questionnaire) was sought, and Proxy interviews were obtained when poor health or temporary absence precluded a direct interview. Questionnaire topics included the following: * HEALTH MEASURES: self-reports of conditions, symptoms, functional status, hygienic behaviors (e.g., smoking & drinking history), use/source/costs of health care services, depression, pain, reading and cognitive performance; * BACKGROUND: Childhood health and living conditions, education, ability to read/write and count, migration history, marital history; * FAMILY: rosters of all children (including deceased children); for each, demographic attributes, summary indicators of childhood and current health, education, current work status, migration. Parent and sibling migration experiences; * TRANSFERS: financial and time help given to and received by respondent from children, indexed to specific child; time and financial help to parent; * ECONOMIC: sources and amounts of income, including wages, pensions, and government subsidies; type and value of assets. All amount variables are bracketed in case of non-response. * HOUSING ENVIRONMENT: type, location, building materials, other indicators of quality, and ownership of consumer durables; * ANTHROPOMETRIC: for a 20% sub-sample, measured weight, height; waist, hip, and calf circumference; knee height, and timed one-leg stands. Current plans are to conduct another two follow-up surveys in 2012 and 2014 and will field the 3rd and 4th waves of survey data collection in Mexico. For the 2012 wave, interviews will be sought for: every person who was part of the panel in 2003 and their new spouse / partner, if applicable, and a new sample of persons born between 1952 and 1962. For the 2014 wave, we will follow-up the whole sample from 2012. Interviews will be conducted person-to-person. Direct interviews will be sought with all informants, but proxy interviews are allowed for those unable to complete their own interview for health or cognitive reasons. A next-of-kin interview will be completed with a knowledgeable respondent for those who were part of the panel but have died since the last interview. A sub-sample will be selected to obtain objective markers such as blood sample and anthropometric measures. Data Availability: The 2001 baseline data, 2003 follow-up data, and documentation can be downloaded. * Dates of Study: 2001-2003 * Study Features: Longitudinal, International, Anthropometric Measures * Sample Size: 2001: 15,186 (Baseline) Link: * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/00142

  • From Current Category

Cite this (National Cell Repository for Alzheimer's Disease, RRID:SCR_007313)

URL: http://ncrad.iu.edu/

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial supply resource, biospecimen repository, tissue bank, service resource, storage service resource, cell repository, material resource, material storage repository

Cell repository for Alzheimer's disease that collects and maintains biological specimens and associated data. Its data is derived from large numbers of genetically informative, phenotypically well-characterized families with multiple individuals affected with Alzheimer's disease, as well as individuals for case-control studies.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (National Long Term Care Survey, RRID:SCR_008943)

URL: http://www.nltcs.aas.duke.edu/index.htm

Resource Type: Resource, data set, biomaterial supply resource, material resource, data or information resource

A data set of a longitudinal survey designed to study changes in the health and functional status of older Americans (aged 65+). It also tracks health expenditures, Medicare service use, and the availability of personal, family, and community resources for caregiving. The survey began in 1982, and follow-up surveys were conducted in 1984, 1989, 1994, 1999, and 2004. The surveys are of the entire Medicare-enrolled aged population with a particular emphasis on the functionally impaired. As sample persons are followed through the Medicare record system, virtually 100% of cases can be longitudinally tracked so that declines, as well as increases, in disability may be identified as well as exact dates of death. NLTCS sample persons are followed until death and are permanently and continuously linked to the Medicare record system from which they are drawn. Linkage to the Medicare Part A and B service use records extends from 1982 to 2004, so that detailed Medicare expenditures and types of service use may be studied. Through the careful application of methods to reduce non-sampling error, the surveys provide nationally representative data on: * The prevalence and patterns of functional limitations, both physical and cognitive; * Longitudinal and cohort patterns of change in functional limitation and mortality over 22 years; * Medical conditions and recent medical problems; * Health care services used; * The kind and amount of formal and informal services received by impaired individuals and how it is paid for; * Demographic and economic characteristics like age, race, sex, marital status, education, and income and assets; * Out-of-pocket expenditures for health care services and other sources of payment; * Housing and neighborhood characteristics. In each of the six surveys, large samples (N~20,000) of the oldest-old population (i.e., those 85 and over) are obtained. The survey data (i.e., detailed community and institutional interviews. The linkage to Medicare enrollment files between 1982 and 2004 was 100%, i.e., there was complete follow-up of all cases (including survey non-respondents) for Medicare eligibility (and for most years, detailed Part A and B use), mortality, and date of death. Medicare mortality records (and dates of death) are available for 1982 to 2005. The number of deaths (i.e., about 32,000 from 1982 to 2005) is large enough that detailed mortality analyses can be done. Over the 22 years spanned by the six surveys, a total of 49,242 distinct individuals were followed from and linked to Medicare records. Data Availability: The data are available through ICPSR as Study No. 9681. The data are available only on CD-ROM and only upon completion of a signed Data Use Agreement. Continuously linked Medicare data (1982 through 2004) for the National Long Term Care Surveys are only available from CMS. * Dates of Study: 1982-2004 * Study Features: Longitudinal, Anthropometric Measures * Sample Size: ** 1982: 20,485 ** 1984: 25,401 ** 1989: 17,565 ** 1994: 19,171 ** 1999: 19,907 ** 2004: 20,474 Link: * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/09681

  • From Current Category

Cite this (National Social Life Health and Aging Project (NSHAP), RRID:SCR_008950)

URL: http://www.norc.org/Research/Projects/Pages/national-social-life-health-and-aging-project.aspx

Resource Type: Resource, data set, biomaterial supply resource, material resource, data or information resource

A longitudinal, population-based study of health and social factors, aiming to understand the well-being of older, community-dwelling Americans by examining the interactions among physical health and illness, medication use, cognitive function, emotional health, sensory function, health behaviors, social connectedness, sexuality, and relationship quality. NSHAP provides policy makers, health providers, and individuals with useful information and insights into these factors, particularly on social and intimate relationships. The study contributes to finding new ways to improve health as people age. In 2005 and 2006, NORC and Principal Investigators at the University of Chicago conducted the first wave of NSHAP, completing more than 3,000 interviews with a nationally representative sample of adults aged 57 to 85. In 2010 and 2011, nearly 3,400 interviews were completed for Wave 2 with these Wave 1 Respondents, Wave 1 Non-Interviewed Respondents, and their spouses or cohabiting romantic partners. The second wave of NSHAP is essential to understanding how social and biological characteristics change. NSHAP, by eliciting a variety of information from respondents over time, provides data that will allow researchers in a number of fields to examine how specific factors may or may not affect each other across the life course. For both waves, data collection included three measurements: in-home interviews, biomeasures, and leave-behind respondent-administered questionnaires. The face-to-face interviews and biomeasure collection took place in respondents'''' homes. NSHAP uses a national area probability sample of community residing adults born between 1920 and 1947 (aged 57 to 85 at the time of the Wave 1 interview), which includes an oversampling of African-Americans and Hispanics. The NSHAP sample is built on the foundation of the national household screening carried out by the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) in 2004. Through a collaborative agreement, HRS identified households for the NSHAP eligible population. A sample of 4,400 people was selected from the screened households. NSHAP made one selection per household. Ninety-two percent of the persons selected for the NSHAP interview were eligible. For Wave 2 in 2010 and 2011, NSHAP returned to Wave 1 Respondents and eligible non-interviewed respondents from Wave 1 (Wave 1 Non-Interviewed Respondents). NSHAP also extended the Wave 2 sample to include the cohabiting spouses and romantic partners of Wave 1 Respondents and Wave 1 Non-Interviewed Respondents. Partners were considered to be eligible to participate in NSHAP if they resided in the household with the Wave 1 Respondent/Wave 1 Non-Interviewed Respondent at the time of the Wave 2 interview and were at least 18 years of age. Wave I biomeasures: height; weight; waist circumference; blood pressure; smell; taste; vision; touch; respondent-administered vaginal swabs; oral mucosal transudate (OMT) for HIV-1 antibody screening; saliva; ??????get up and go??????; and blood spots. Technological advances in biomeasure collection methods have decreased respondent burden and increased ease of collection, storage, and yield of various biomeasures for the second wave of NSHAP. Wave II biomeasures: anthropometrics, including height, hip and waist circumference, and weight; cardiovascular function, including blood pressure, heart rate variability, and pulse; 2 of the 3 components of the short physical performance battery (SPPB) including chair stands and a timed walk; sensory function including smell; and actigraphy. In addition, we collect dried blood spots, microtainer blood, passive drool and salivettes, urine, and respondent-administered vaginal swabs, each of which are analyzed using multiple assays for a variety of measures and rationales. Furthermore, we assess respondents?????? cognition using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Data Availability: NSHAP data made available to the public does not contain any identifiable respondent information and uses code numbers instead of names for all data. De-identified data from the 2005 and 2006 interviews are available to researchers through the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging, located within Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR). Data from the Wave 2 interviews in 2010 and 2011 will be available in the summer of 2012. * Dates of Study: 2005-2006, 2010-2011 * Study Features: Biospecimens, Anthropometric Measures * Sample Size: ** Wave 1: 3,005 ** Wave 2: 3,377 Links: * ICPSR: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/20541

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Northwestern CNADC Tissue Bank / Neuropathology Core, RRID:SCR_013178)

URL: http://www.brain.northwestern.edu/research/for-researchers/index.html

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial supply resource, tissue bank, service resource, brain bank, storage service resource, material resource, material storage repository

Tissue bank for collecting, cataloging and storing postmortem brain tissue samples from subjects with and without neurological disorders. Specimens are available for research on cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's, dementia and other disorders along with clinical data such as demographic information, health and family history and neuropsychological test scores. The bank provides services to distribute postmortem brain tissue and other samples to investigators for use in research that will provide qualitative and quantitative diagnostic information to physicians, families, and researchers.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study in Taiwan, RRID:SCR_003704)

URL: http://cph.georgetown.edu/taiwan.html

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Data sets of information regarding the health and well-being of older persons in Taiwan (from 2000 and 2006), in particular the relationship between life challenges and mental and physical health, the impact of social environment on the health and well-being of the elderly, and biological markers of health and stress. The study collected self-reports of physical, psychological, and social well-being, plus extensive clinical data based on medical examinations and laboratory analyses. Examination of health outcomes included chronic illnesses, functional status, psychological well-being, and cognitive function. Questions regarding life challenges focused on perceived stress, economic difficulties, security and safety, and the consequences of a major earthquake. Biological markers were used to identify cardiovascular risk factors, metabolic process measures, immune-system activity, the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis, and sympathetic nervous system activity. The study design consists of face-to-face interviews with participants drawn from a random sub-sample of participants from 27 PSUs from the 1999 Survey of Health and Living Status of the Middle Aged and Elderly in Taiwan. Hospital visits and blood and urine specimens also were collected. A second wave of SEBAS was conducted in 2006 using a similar protocol to SEBAS 2000, but with the addition of performance assessments conducted by the interviewers at the end of the home interview. * Dates of Study: -2000, 2006 * Study Features: Longitudinal, International, Anthropometric Measures * Sample Size: 27 PSUs

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Repository, RRID:SCR_008810)

URL: http://www.swanrepository.com/

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial supply resource, data or information resource, material resource, cell repository

The SWAN Repository is the biologic specimen bank of the Study of Women''s Health Across the Nation (SWAN). SWAN is a National Institutes of Health funded, multi-site, longitudinal study of the natural history of the midlife including the menopausal transition. The overall goal of SWAN is to describe the chronology of the biological and psychosocial characteristics that occur during midlife and the menopausal transition. In addition, SWAN is describing the effect of the transition and its associated characteristics on subsequent health and risk factors for age related chronic diseases. SWAN was designed to collect and analyze information on demographics, health and social characteristics, reproductive history, pre-existing illness, physical activity, and health practices of mid-life women in multi-ethnic, community-based samples; elucidate factors that differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic women during the menopausal transition; identify and utilize appropriate markers of the aging of the ovarian-hypothalamo-pituitary axis and relate these markers to alterations in menstrual cycle characteristics as women approach and traverse the menopause; and explain factors that differentiate women most susceptible to long-term pathophysiological consequences of ovarian hormone deficiency from those who are protected. The biological specimen bank can also be linked by identification number (not by participant name) to data collected in the Core SWAN protocol. The specimen bank can also be linked with data from the Daily Hormone Study as well as menstrual calendars. Types of data include: epidemiological data, psychosocial data, physical measures, as well as data from assays (endocrine and cardiovascular information). SWAN has seven clinical study sites located in six states, two in California, and one each in Chicago, Boston, Detroit area, northern New Jersey and Pittsburgh. The SWAN cohort was recruited in 1996/7 and consists of 3302 African American, Caucasian, Chinese American, Hispanic and Japanese American women. Cohort members complete an annual clinic visit. The Core Repository includes over 1.8 million samples from the first 11 years of specimen collection. This includes samples from annual visits and samples from the Daily Hormone Sub-study (DHS). During an Annual visit, participants provide materials for up to 24-28 aliquots to be incorporated into the Repository. During a DHS visit, a participant provides 6 serum samples and between ~30-50 urine samples depending upon the length of her menstrual cycle. DHS participants (887) provide urine samples collected throughout one menstrual cycle each year. A typical DHS collection consists of a blood draw plus collection of 10 ml of urine daily throughout the month-long menstrual cycle, up to 50 days. DHS Repository samples consist of 6 serum samples and 30 5 ml urine samples. Specimen collection occurs from the time of menstrual bleed to the subsequent menstrual bleed or up to 50 days, whichever come first. The current DHS collection consists of more than 200,000 specimens stored in 5 ml vials. The SWAN DNA Repository currently contains extracted diluted DNA from 1538 SWAN participants. B-lymphocytes were transformed with Epstein Barr virus, and the resulting transformed b-cells aliquoted. Information about using these transformed cells for genomic or proteomic studies is available. DNA has been extracted from one aliquot (per woman) of the immortalized cells using the Puregene system. There was an average DNA yield of 217.0 mg/mL and a A260/A280 average ratio of 1.86. This DNA, in turn, has been aliquoted into 20ng/1 ml units for release by the DNA Repository. Samples are free of personal identifiers and collected under consents that allow a broad range of activities related to women''s health. All of these samples are available to researchers who wish to study the midlife and menopausal transition. Scientists who use these specimens can also request data collected during a participant''s annual visit including medical and health history, psychosocial measures, biological measures and anthropometry.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (University of Kentucky's Alzheimer's Disease Center, RRID:SCR_008766)

URL: http://www.uky.edu/coa/adc/investigators-research-resources

Resource Type: Resource, training service resource, database, biomaterial supply resource, people resource, tissue bank, service resource, brain bank, patient registry, material resource, data or information resource

An organization which includes a tissue bank, a database, study design consultation, clinical resources, and a community registry database. The UK-ADC shares data with the NIA national database (NACC), as well as with independent, qualified investigators both within and outside the UK-ADC. This resource's associated tissue bank is comprised of anonymized brain tissue, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients in the clinic, as well as frozen post-mortem brain tissue samples. This organization also shares research resources with the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC), NACC collaborative initiatives, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), other Alzheimer Disease Centers (ADCs), and any qualified investigators from either the University of Kentucky or the general scientific community.

  • From Current Category

  1. RRID Portal Resources

    Welcome to the RRID Resources search. From here you can search through a compilation of resources used by RRID and see how data is organized within our community.

  2. Navigation

    You are currently on the Community Resources tab looking through categories and sources that RRID has compiled. You can navigate through those categories from here or change to a different tab to execute your search through. Each tab gives a different perspective on data.

  3. Logging in and Registering

    If you have an account on RRID then you can log in from here to get additional features in RRID such as Collections, Saved Searches, and managing Resources.

  4. Searching

    Here is the search term that is being executed, you can type in anything you want to search for. Some tips to help searching:

    1. Use quotes around phrases you want to match exactly
    2. You can manually AND and OR terms to change how we search between words
    3. You can add "-" to terms to make sure no results return with that term in them (ex. Cerebellum -CA1)
    4. You can add "+" to terms to require they be in the data
    5. Using autocomplete specifies which branch of our semantics you with to search and can help refine your search
  5. Save Your Search

    You can save any searches you perform for quick access to later from here.

  6. Query Expansion

    We recognized your search term and included synonyms and inferred terms along side your term to help get the data you are looking for.

  7. Collections

    If you are logged into RRID you can add data records to your collections to create custom spreadsheets across multiple sources of data.

  8. Sources

    Here are the sources that were queried against in your search that you can investigate further.

  9. Categories

    Here are the categories present within RRID that you can filter your data on

  10. Subcategories

    Here are the subcategories present within this category that you can filter your data on

  11. Further Questions

    If you have any further questions please check out our FAQs Page to ask questions and see our tutorials. Click this button to view this tutorial again.

X