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Cite this (Framingham Heart Study, RRID:SCR_008963)

URL: http://www.framinghamheartstudy.org/

Resource Type: Resource, disease-related portal, topical portal, research forum portal, biomaterial supply resource, data set, portal, material resource, data or information resource

A longitudinal, epidemiologic study to identify the common risk factors or characteristics that contribute to cardiovascular disease by following its development over a long period of time in a large group of participants who had not yet developed overt symptoms or suffered a heart attack or stroke. Since that time the FHS has studied three generations of participants resulting in biological specimens and data from nearly 15,000 participants. Since 1994, two groups from minority populations, including related individuals have been added to the FHS. FHS welcomes proposals from outside investigators for data and biospecimens. The researchers recruited 5,209 men and women between the ages of 30 and 62 from the town of Framingham, Massachusetts, and began the first round of extensive physical examinations and lifestyle interviews that they would later analyze for common patterns related to CVD development. Since 1948, the subjects have continued to return to the study every two years for a detailed medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, and in 1971, the Study enrolled a second generation - 5,124 of the original participants'''' adult children and their spouses - to participate in similar examinations. In 1994, the need to establish a new study reflecting a more diverse community of Framingham was recognized, and the first Omni cohort of the Framingham Heart Study was enrolled. In April 2002 the Study entered a new phase, the enrollment of a third generation of participants, the grandchildren of the Original Cohort. In 2003, a second group of Omni participants was enrolled. Over the years, careful monitoring of the Framingham Study population has led to the identification of major CVD risk factors, as well as valuable information on the effects of these factors such as blood pressure, blood triglyceride and cholesterol levels, age, gender, and psychosocial issues. Risk factors for other physiological conditions such as dementia have been and continue to be investigated. In addition, the relationships between physical traits and genetic patterns are being studied. FHS clinical and research data is stored in the dbGaP and NHLBI Repository repositories and may be accessed by application. Please check the following repositories before applying for data through FHS. Investigators seeking data that is not available through dbGaP or BioLINCC or seeking biological specimens may submit a proposal through the FHS web-based research application. The FHS data repository may be accessed through this FHS website, under the For Researchers link, then Description of Data, in order to determine if and how the desired data is stored. Proposals may involve the use of existing data, the collection of new data, either directly from participants or from previously collected samples, images, or other materials (e.g., medical records). The FHS Repository also has biological specimens available for genetic and non-genetic research proposals. Specimens include urine, blood and blood products, as well as DNA.

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Cite this (NIH Data Sharing Repositories, RRID:SCR_003551)

URL: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/NIHbmic/nih_data_sharing_repositories.html

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

A listing of NIH supported data sharing repositories that make data accessible for reuse. Most accept submissions of appropriate data from NIH-funded investigators (and others), but some restrict data submission to only those researchers involved in a specific research network. Also included are resources that aggregate information about biomedical data and information sharing systems. The table can be sorted according by name and by NIH Institute or Center and may be searched using keywords so that you can find repositories more relevant to your data. Links are provided to information about submitting data to and accessing data from the listed repositories. Additional information about the repositories and points-of-contact for further information or inquiries can be found on the websites of the individual repositories.

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