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on page 1 showing 4 out of 4 results

Cite this (GeneDB Lmajor, RRID:SCR_004613)

URL: http://www.genedb.org/Homepage/Lmajor

Resource Type: Resource, data analysis service, production service resource, analysis service resource, database, service resource, data or information resource

Database of the most recent sequence updates and annotations for the L. major genome. New annotations are constantly being added to keep up with published manuscripts and feedback from the Trypanosomatid research community. You may search by Protein Length, Molecular Mass, Gene Type, Date, Location, Protein Targeting, Transmembrane Helices, Product, GO, EC, Pfam ID, Curation and Comments, and Dbxrefs. BLAST and other tools are available. Leishmania species cause a spectrum of human diseases in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. We have sequenced the 36 chromosomes of the 32.8-megabase haploid genome of Leishmania major (Friedlin strain) and predict 911 RNA genes, 39 pseudogenes, and 8272 protein-coding genes, of which 36% can be ascribed a putative function. These include genes involved in host-pathogen interactions, such as proteolytic enzymes, and extensive machinery for synthesis of complex surface glycoconjugates. The Pathogen Genomics group at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute played a major role in sequencing the genome of Leishmania major (see Ivens et al.) Details of the centres involved and which chromosomes they sequenced, are given. The sequence data were obtained by adopting several parallel approaches, including complete cosmid sequencing, whole chromosome shotguns and/or BAC sequencing/skimming. The Leishmania parasite is an intracellular pathogen of the immune system targeting macrophages and dendritic cells. The disease Leishmaniasis affects the populations of 88 counties worldwide with symptoms ranging from disfiguring cutaneous and muco-cutaneous lesions that can cause widespread destruction of mucous membranes to visceral disease affecting the haemopoetic organs. In collaboration with GeneDB, the EuPathDB genomic sequence data and annotations are regularly deposited on TriTrypDB where they can be integrated with other datasets and queried using customized queries.

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Cite this (GeneDB Pfalciparum, RRID:SCR_006567)

URL: http://www.genedb.org/Homepage/Pfalciparum

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

Database of the most recent sequence updates and annotations for the P. falciparum genome. New annotations are constantly being added to keep up with published manuscripts and feedback from the Plasmodium research community. You may search by Protein Length, Molecular Mass, Gene Type, Date, Location, Protein Targeting, Transmembrane Helices, Product, GO, EC, Pfam ID, Curation and Comments, and Dbxrefs. BLAST and other tools are available. The P. falciparum 3D7 nuclear genome is 23.3 Mb in size, with a karyotype of 14 chromosomes. The G+C content is approximately 19%. The P. falciparum genome is undergoing re-annotation. This process started in October 2007 with a weeklong workshop co-organized by staff from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Intistute and the EuPathDB team. Ongoing curation and sequence checking is being carried out by the Pathogen Genomics group. Plasmodium falciparum is the most deadly of the five Plasmodium species that cause human malaria. Malaria has a massive impact on human health; it is the worlds second biggest killer after tuberculosis. Around 300 million clinical cases occur each year resulting in between 1.5 - 2.7 million deaths annually, the majority in sub-saharan Africa. It is estimated that 3,000 children under the age of five years fall victim to malaria each day. Around 40% of the worlds population are at risk. In collaboration with EuPathDB, genomic sequence data and annotations are regularly deposited on PlasmoDB where they can be integrated with other datasets and queried using customized queries.

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Cite this (GeneDB Tbrucei, RRID:SCR_004786)

URL: http://www.genedb.org/Homepage/Tbruceibrucei927

Resource Type: Resource, data analysis service, production service resource, analysis service resource, database, service resource, data or information resource

Database of the most recent sequence updates and annotations for the T. brucei genome. New annotations are constantly being added to keep up with published manuscripts and feedback from the Trypanosomatid research community. You may search by Protein Length, Molecular Mass, Gene Type, Date, Location, Protein Targeting, Transmembrane Helices, Product, GO, EC, Pfam ID, Curation and Comments, and Dbxrefs. BLAST and other tools are available. T. brucei possesses a two-unit genome, a nuclear genome and a mitochondrial (kinetoplast) genome with a total estimated size of 35Mb/haploid genome. The nuclear genome is split into three classes of chromosomes according to their size on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, 11 pairs of megabase chromosomes (0.9-5.7 Mb), intermediate (300-900 kb) and minichromosomes (50-100 kb). The T. brucei genome contains a ~0.5Mb segmental duplication affecting chromosomes 4 and 8, which is responsible for some 75 gene duplicates unique to this species. A comparative chromosome map of the duplicons can be accessed here (PubmedID 18036214). Protozoan parasites within the species Trypanosoma brucei are the etiological agent of human sleeping sickness and Nagana in animals. Infections are limited to patches of sub-Saharan Africa where insects vectors of the Glossina genus are endemic. The most recent estimates indicate between 50,000 - 70,000 human cases currently exist, with 17 000 new cases each year (WHO Factsheet, 2006). In collaboration with GeneDB, the EuPathDB genomic sequence data and annotations are regularly deposited on TriTrypDB where they can be integrated with other datasets and queried using customized queries.

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    PomBase

Cite this (PomBase, RRID:SCR_006586)

URL: http://www.pombase.org/

Resource Type: Resource, service resource, data or information resource, data repository, storage service resource, database

Model organism database that provides organization of and access to scientific data for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. PomBase supports genomic sequence and features, genome-wide datasets and manual literature curation. PomBase also provides a community hub for researchers, providing genome statistics, a community curation interface, news, events, documentation, mailing lists, and welcomes data submissions.

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