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on page 1 showing 6 out of 6 results

Cite this (Anopheles gambiae (African malaria mosquito) genome view, RRID:SCR_004402)

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mapview/map_search.cgi?taxid=7165

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

A database for the Anopheles gambiae str. PEST genome that was sequenced using a whole genome shotgun approach. The database aims to contribute to the understanding of mosquito genome structure and organization and will assist the development of malaria control strategies and improved anti-malarial drugs and vaccines. Sequences were generated and assembled into contigs for submission to GenBank.

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Cite this (DDBJ - DNA Data Bank of Japan, RRID:SCR_002359)

URL: http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp

Resource Type: Resource, service resource, data or information resource, data repository, storage service resource, database

The sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters. It is one of 3 summit databanks that construct the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank International Nucleotide Sequence Database, which was established through cooperative work with EBI in Europe and NCBI in USA. Since the collected data is exchanged with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database. DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but accepts data and issues accession numbers to researchers in other countries.

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Cite this (High Throughput Genomic Sequences Division, RRID:SCR_002150)

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/HTGS/

Resource Type: Resource, service resource, data or information resource, data repository, storage service resource, database

Database of high-throughput genome sequences from large-scale genome sequencing centers, including unfinished and finished sequences. It was created to accommodate a growing need to make unfinished genomic sequence data rapidly available to the scientific community in a coordinated effort among the International Nucleotide Sequence databases, DDBJ, EMBL, and GenBank. Sequences are prepared for submission by using NCBI's software tools Sequin or tbl2asn. Each center has an FTP directory into which new or updated sequence files are placed. Sequence data in this division are available for BLAST homology searches against either the htgs database or the month database, which includes all new submissions for the prior month. Unfinished HTG sequences containing contigs greater than 2 kb are assigned an accession number and deposited in the HTG division. A typical HTG record might consist of all the first-pass sequence data generated from a single cosmid, BAC, YAC, or P1 clone, which together make up more than 2 kb and contain one or more gaps. A single accession number is assigned to this collection of sequences, and each record includes a clear indication of the status (phase 1 or 2) plus a prominent warning that the sequence data are unfinished and may contain errors. The accession number does not change as sequence records are updated; only the most recent version of a HTG record remains in GenBank.

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Cite this (Influenza Virus Resource, RRID:SCR_002984)

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genomes/FLU/

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

Database of data obtained from the NIAID Influenza Genome Sequencing Project as well as from GenBank, combined with tools for flu sequence analysis and annotation. In addition, it provides links to other resources that contain flu sequences, publications and general information about flu viruses. Users can search the Flu database, build queries, retrieve sequences, and apply analysis tools. This includes selecting influenza sequences by virus, subtype, host, and other criteria, finding complete genome sets, aligning sequence and others in the database (up to 1000 sequences), viewing clustering and phylogenetic trees, BLAST searching a flu sequence against the database, and more.

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    MaizeGDB

Cite this (MaizeGDB, RRID:SCR_006600)

URL: http://www.maizegdb.org

Resource Type: Resource, topical portal, database, analysis service resource, organism-related portal, data analysis service, service resource, portal, production service resource, storage service resource, data repository, data or information resource

Collection of data related to crop plant and model organism Zea mays. Used to synthesize, display, and provide access to maize genomics and genetics data, prioritizing mutant and phenotype data and tools, structural and genetic map sets, and gene models and to provide support services to the community of maize researchers. Data stored at MaizeGDB was inherited from the MaizeDB and ZmDB projects. Sequence data are from GenBank. Data are searchable by phenotype, traits, Pests, Gel Pattern, and Mutant Images.

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Cite this (Zebrafish Gene Collection, RRID:SCR_007054)

URL: http://zgc.nci.nih.gov/

Resource Type: Resource, biomaterial supply resource, material resource

Produce cDNA libraries, clones and sequences to provide a complete set of full-length (open reading frame) sequences and cDNA clones of expressed genes for zebrafish. All resources generated by the ZGC are publicly accessible to the biomedical research community. As part of the zebrafish genome project, a collection of full-length cDNAs has many potential applications, such as: * Enumerating the genes, improving the accuracy of gene identification, and annotating other genomes. * Allowing genetic manipulations such as complementation tests or over expression analysis. * Providing information about the 5' untranslated or AUG regions of genes for construction of morpholinos, the primary tool for gene expression knockdown in zebrafish. * Providing an invaluable reagent for any researcher studying a particular gene or developing arrays or other tools to study multiple genes. All ZGC sequences are deposited in GenBank and the clones can be purchased from distributors of the IMAGE consortium. With the conclusion of the ZGC project in September 2008, the GenBank records of ZGC sequences will be frozen, without further updates. Since the definition of what constitutes a full-length coding region for some of the genes and transcripts for which we have ZGC clones will likely change in the future, users planning to order ZGC clones will need to monitor for these changes. Users can make use of genome browsers and gene-specific databases, such as the UCSC Genome browser, NCBI's Map Viewer, and Entrez Gene, to view the relevant regions of the genome (browsers) or gene-related information (Entrez Gene).

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