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on page 1 showing 20 out of 198 results from 1 sources

    ABIDE

Cite this (ABIDE, RRID:SCR_003612)

URL: http://fcon_1000.projects.nitrc.org/indi/abide/

Resource Type: Resource, data set, data or information resource

Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) datasets from 539 individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 573 typical controls. This initiative involved 16 international sites, sharing 20 samples yielding 1112 datasets composed of both MRI data and an extensive array of phenotypic information common across nearly all sites. This effort is expected to facilitate discovery science and comparisons across samples. All datasets are anonymous, with no protected health information included.

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Cite this (Add Health (National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health), RRID:SCR_007434)

URL: http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

Longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. Public data on about 21,000 people first surveyed in 1994 are available on the first phases of the study, as well as study design specifications. It also includes some parent and biomarker data. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The restricted-use contract includes four hours of free consultation with appropriate staff; after that, there''s a fee for help. Researchers can also share information through a listserv devoted to the database.

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Cite this (Analysis of Functional NeuroImages, RRID:SCR_005927)

URL: http://afni.nimh.nih.gov/afni/

Resource Type: Resource, source code, data analysis software, data processing software, software application, data visualization software, software resource, software toolkit

Set of (mostly) C programs that run on X11+Unix-based platforms (Linux, Mac OS X, Solaris, etc.) for processing, analyzing, and displaying functional MRI (FMRI) data defined over 3D volumes and over 2D cortical surface meshes. AFNI is freely distributed as source code plus some precompiled binaries.

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Cite this (Army STARRS, RRID:SCR_006708)

URL: http://www.armystarrs.org/

Resource Type: Resource, disease-related portal, topical portal, data or information resource, portal, research forum portal

Study of mental health risk and resilience factors ever conducted among military personnel. The purpose of Army STARRS is to identify as quickly as possible factors that protect or pose risks to Soldiers'' emotional well-being and overall mental health so that the Army may apply the knowledge to its ongoing health promotion, risk reduction, and suicide prevention efforts. Army STARRS investigators will use four separate study components the Historical Data Study, New Soldier Study, All Army Study, and Soldier Health Outcomes Study to identify factors that help protect a Soldier''s mental health and factors that put a Soldier''s mental health at risk. Army STARRS is a five-year study that will run through 2014. Findings will be reported as they become available, so that the Army may apply them to its ongoing health promotion, risk reduction, and suicide prevention efforts. Given its length and scope, Army STARRS will generate a vast amount of information and will allow investigators to focus on periods in a military career that are known to be high risk for psychological problems. The information gathered from volunteer participants throughout the study will help researchers identify not only potentially relevant risk factors, but potential protective factors as well. Because promoting mental health and reducing suicide risk are important for all Americans, the findings from Army STARRS will benefit not only servicemembers but the nation as a whole. NIMH has assembled a group of renowned experts to carry out this research including teams from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS), the University of California, San Diego, University of Michigan, Harvard Medical School, and NIMH. Additional Army and NIMH program staff will contribute to the oversight and implementation of the study. This research team brings together international leaders in military health, health and behavior surveys, epidemiology, suicide, and genetic and neurobiological factors involved in psychological health.

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Cite this (Autism Genetic Resource Exchange, RRID:SCR_004403)

URL: http://www.agre.org/index.cfm

Resource Type: Resource, database, biomaterial supply resource, biospecimen repository, service resource, storage service resource, cell repository, material storage repository, material resource, data or information resource

A private repository of clinical and genetic information on families with autism. Genetic and clinical data are obtained from families that have more than one family member diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. The biological samples, along with the accompanying clinical data, are made available to AGRE-approved researchers worldwide. As they become available, additional family pedigrees will be posted in the online catalog. Cell lines have been established for the majority of families in this collection and serum/plasma is available on a subset of the subjects until stocks are depleted. The diagnosis of autism has been made using the standard Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithm and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale (ADOS-G). Detailed birth and medical histories (including basic dysmorphology assessments) on children as well as family and medical information for parents and unaffected siblings, are available for nearly all families. DNA, cell lines, serum, plasma and clinical information are made available to AGRE-approved researchers for analysis.

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Cite this (BAMS Cells, RRID:SCR_003531)

URL: http://brancusi.usc.edu/bkms/

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

BAMS is an online resource for information about neural circuitry. The BAMS Cell view focuses on the major brain regions and which cells are contained therein.

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Cite this (BAMS Nested Regions, RRID:SCR_000238)

URL: http://brancusi.usc.edu/bkms/

Resource Type: Resource, data or information resource, database

BAMS is an online resource for information about neural circuitry. The BAMS Nested Regions view focuses on the major brain regions and their relationships

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Cite this (BAMS Neuroanatomical Ontology, RRID:SCR_004616)

URL: http://brancusi.usc.edu/bkms/bams-ontology.html

Resource Type: Resource, ontology, data or information resource, controlled vocabulary

BAMS Neuroanatomical Ontology is a lightweght ontology designed specifically for neuroscience. It contains a complete set of concepts that describe the structure of the rat CNS and a growing set of concepts that describe different neuron populations in the rat CNS.

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    BICCN

Cite this (BICCN, RRID:SCR_015820)

URL: http://scicrunch.org/biccn

Resource Type: Resource, organization portal, portal, consortium, data or information resource

Consortium for the cell census in the brain. It is funded by the BRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network (BICCN) grants.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Bio-eagle, RRID:SCR_015991)

URL: https://data.broadinstitute.org/alkesgroup/Eagle/

Resource Type: Resource, data analysis software, data processing software, software application, sequence analysis software, software resource, software toolkit

Software package for statistical estimation of haplotype phase either within a genotyped cohort or using a phased reference panel in large scale sequencing. The package includes Eagle1 (to harness identity-by-descent among distant relatives to rapidly call phase using a fast scoring approach) and Eagle2 (to analyze a full probabilistic model similar to the diploid Li-Stephens model used by previous HMM-based methods.

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Cite this (BMAP - Brain Molecular Anatomy Project, RRID:SCR_008852)

URL: http://trans.nih.gov/bmap/index.htm

Resource Type: Resource, topical portal, portal, funding resource, data or information resource

The Brain Molecular Anatomy Project is a trans-NIH project aimed at understanding gene expression and function in the nervous system. BMAP has two major scientific goals: # Gene discovery: to catalog of all the genes expressed in the nervous system, under both normal and abnormal conditions. # Gene expression analysis: to monitor gene expression patterns in the nervous system as a function of cell type, anatomical location, developmental stage, and physiological state, and thus gain insight into gene function. In pursuit of these goals, BMAP has launched several initiatives to provide resources and funding opportunities for the scientific community. These include several Requests for Applications and Requests for Proposals, descriptions of which can be found in this Web site. BMAP is also in the process of establishing physical and electronic resources for the community, including repositories of cDNA clones for nervous system genes, and databases of gene expression information for the nervous system. Most of the BMAP initiatives so far have focused on the mouse as a model species because of the ease of experimental and genetic manipulation of this organism, and because many models of human disease are available in the mouse. However, research in humans, other mammalian species, non-mammalian vertebrates, and invertebrates is also being funded through BMAP. For the convenience of interested investigators, we have established this Web site as a central information resource, focusing on major NIH-sponsored funding opportunities, initiatives, genomic resources available to the research community, courses and scientific meetings related to BMAP initiatives, and selected reports and publications. When appropriate, we will also post initiatives not directly sponsored by BMAP, but which are deemed relevant to its goals. Posting decisions are made by the Trans-NIH BMAP Committee

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Cite this ( BMAP cDNA Resources , RRID:SCR_002973)

URL: http://trans.nih.gov/bmap/resources/resources.htm

Resource Type: Resource, topical portal, resource, production service resource, material service resource, service resource, portal, biomaterial manufacture, data or information resource

As part of BMAP gene discovery efforts, mouse brain cDNA libraries and Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) have been generated. Through this project a BMAP mouse brain UniGene set consisting of over 24,000 non-redundant members of unique clusters has been developed from EST sequencing of more than 50,000 cDNA clones from 10 regions of adult mouse brain, spinal cord, and retina (http://brainEST.eng.uiowa.edu/). In 2001, NIMH along with NICHD, NIDDK, and NIDA, awarded a contract to the University of Iowa ( M.B. Soares, PI) to isolate full-length cDNA clones corresponding to genes expressed in the developing mouse nervous system and determine their full-coding sequences. The BMAP mouse brain EST sequences can be accessed at NCBI's dbEST database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/dbEST/). Arrayed sets of BMAP mouse brain UniGenes and cDNA libraries, and individual BMAP cDNA clones can be purchased from Open Biosystems, Huntsville, AL (http://www.openbiosystems.com

  • From Current Category

Cite this (Brain Architecture Management System, RRID:SCR_007251)

URL: http://brancusi.usc.edu/bkms/

Resource Type: Resource, data repository, ontology, database, service resource, storage service resource, controlled vocabulary, data or information resource

Database and repository for information about neural circuitry, storing and analyzing data concerned with nomenclature, taxonomy, axonal connections, and neuronal cell types. BAMS is also an online knowledge management system designed to handle neurobiological information at different levels of organization of the vertebrate nervous system (NS).

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Cite this (Brain Architecture Project, RRID:SCR_004283)

URL: http://brainarchitecture.org/

Resource Type: Resource, topical portal, portal, data or information resource

Evolving portal that will provide interactive tools and resources to allow researchers, clinicians, and students to discover, analyze, and visualize what is known about the brain's organization, and what the evidence is for that knowledge. This project has a current experimental focus: creating the first brainwide mesoscopic connectivity diagram in the mouse. Related efforts for the human brain currently focus on literature mining and an Online Brain Atlas Reconciliation Tool. The primary goal of the Brain Architecture Project is to assemble available knowledge about the structure of the nervous system, with an ultimate emphasis on the human CNS. Such information is currently scattered in research articles, textbooks, electronic databases and datasets, and even as samples on laboratory shelves. Pooling the knowledge across these heterogeneous materials - even simply getting to know what we know - is a complex challenge that requires an interdisciplinary approach and the contributions and support of the greater community. Their approach can be divided into 4 major thrusts: * Literature Curation and Text Mining * Computational Analysis * Resource Development * Experimental Efforts

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Cite this (Brain Basics, RRID:SCR_005606)

URL: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/educational-resources/brain-basics/brain-basics.shtml

Resource Type: Resource, narrative resource, training material, video resource, data or information resource

Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders. Mental disorders are common. You may have a friend, colleague, or relative with a mental disorder, or perhaps you have experienced one yourself at some point. Such disorders include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and many others. Some people who develop a mental illness may recover completely; others may have repeated episodes of illness with relatively stable periods in between. Still others live with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause severe disability. Through research, we know that mental disorders are brain disorders. Evidence shows that they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: * How the brain develops * How genes and the environment affect the brain * The basic structure of the brain * How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other * How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression.

  • From Current Category

Cite this (BrainColor: Collaborative Open Labeling Online Resource, RRID:SCR_006377)

URL: http://www.braincolor.org/

Resource Type: Resource, narrative resource, knowledge environment, standard specification, data or information resource

A group interested in brain anatomical labels, labeling methods, and color maps hosting descriptions of protocols, definitions, and rules of thumb for the reliable identification and localization of neuroanatomical regions of interest and discussions of best practices in brain labeling. The main focuses of this resource are the MediaWiki and Forums Projects: * labels - and labeling protocols for labeling macroscopic anatomy in MRI brain volumes * colors - optimized for labeling/viewing groups of adjacent regions in 2-D or 3-D images * brains - labeled with the BrainCOLOR protocol, displayed with our ROYG Brain Image Viewer They are now developing an online interactive tool for anyone in the world to submit comments about the label boundaries of any structure in any of the brains they are labeling. These edits will be reviewed by the team that helped develop the proposed brainCOLOR cortical labeling protocol. In the meantime, please take their surveys, to ensure that the free, downloadable resources they create will be meaningful and useful to the neuroscientific community.

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Cite this (BrainInfo, RRID:SCR_003142)

URL: http://braininfo.rprc.washington.edu

Resource Type: Resource, topical portal, database, standard specification, narrative resource, portal, atlas, data or information resource

Portal to neuroanatomical information on the Web that helps you identify structures in the brain and provides a variety of information about each structure by porting you to the best of 1500 web pages at 100 other neuroscience sites. BrainInfo consists of three basic components: NeuroNames, a developing database of definitions of neuroanatomic structures in four species, their most common acronyms and their names in eight languages; NeuroMaps, a digital atlas system based on 3-D canonical stereotaxic atlases of rhesus macaque and mouse brains and programs that enable one to map data to standard surface and cross-sectional views of the brains for presentation and publication; and the NeuroMaps precursor: Template Atlas of the Primate Brain, a 2-D stereotaxic atlas of the longtailed (fascicularis) macaque brain that shows the locations of some 250 architectonic areas of macaque cortex. The NeuroMaps atlases will soon include a number of overlays showing the locations of cortical areas and other neuroscientific data in the standard frameworks of the macaque and mouse atlases. Viewers are encouraged to use NeuroNames as a stable source of unique standard terms and acronyms for brain structures in publications, illustrations and indexing systems; to use templates extracted from the NeuroMaps macaque and mouse brain atlases for presenting neuroscientific information in image format; and to use the Template Atlas for warping to MRIs or PET scans of the macaque brain to estimate the stereotaxic locations of structures.

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Cite this (brainmap.org, RRID:SCR_003069)

URL: http://brainmap.org/

Resource Type: Resource, software resource, software application, data or information resource, database

A community database of published functional and structural neuroimaging experiments with both metadata descriptions of experimental design and activation locations in the form of stereotactic coordinates (x,y,z) in Talairach or MNI space. BrainMap provides not only data for meta-analyses and data mining, but also distributes software and concepts for quantitative integration of neuroimaging data. The goal of BrainMap is to develop software and tools to share neuroimaging results and enable meta-analysis of studies of human brain function and structure in healthy and diseased subjects. It is a tool to rapidly retrieve and understand studies in specific research domains, such as language, memory, attention, reasoning, emotion, and perception, and to perform meta-analyses of like studies. Brainmap contains the following software: # Sleuth: database searches and Talairach coordinate plotting (this application requires a username and password) # GingerALE: performs meta-analyses via the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) method; also converts coordinates between MNI and Talairach spaces using icbm2tal # Scribe: database entry of published functional neuroimaging papers with coordinate results

  • From Current Category

Cite this (BrainMaps.org, RRID:SCR_006878)

URL: http://brainmaps.org

Resource Type: Resource, service resource, storage service resource, atlas, image repository, data repository, data or information resource

An interactive multiresolution brain atlas that is based on over 20 million megapixels of sub-micron resolution, annotated, scanned images of serial sections of both primate and non-primate brains and integrated with a high-speed database for querying and retrieving data about brain structure and function. Currently featured are complete brain atlas datasets for various species, including Macaca mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops, Felis catus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Tyto alba and many other vertebrates. BrainMaps is currently accepting histochemical, immunocytochemical, and tracer connectivity data, preferably whole-brain. In addition, they are interested in EM, MRI, and DTI data.

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    BrainML

Cite this (BrainML, RRID:SCR_007087)

URL: http://brainml.org/goto.do?page=.home

Resource Type: Resource, database, standard specification, narrative resource, service resource, storage service resource, data repository, data or information resource

Set of standards and practices for using XML to facilitate information exchange between user application software and neuroscience data repositories. It allows for common shared library routines to handle most of the data processing, but also supports use of structures specialized to the needs of particular neuroscience communities. This site also serves as a repository for BrainML models. (A BrainML model is an XML Schema and optional vocabulary files describing a data model for electronic representation of neuroscience data, including data types, formats, and controlled vocabulary. ) It focuses on layered definitions built over a common core in order to support community-driven extension. One such extension is provided by the new NIH-supported neuroinformatics initiative of the Society for Neuroscience, which supports the development of expert-derived terminology sets for several areas of neuroscience. Under a cooperative agreement, these term lists will be made available Open Source on this site.
The repository function of this site includes the following features:
* BrainML models are published in searchable, browsable form.
* Registered users may submit new models or new versions of existing models to accommodate data of interest. * BrainML model schema and vocabulary files are made available at fixed URLs to allow software applications to reference them.
* Users can check models and/or instance documents for correct format before submitting them using an online validation service.
To complement the BrainML modeling language, a set of protocols have been developed for BrainML document exchange between repositories and clients, for indexing of repositories, and for data query.

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