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Anti-Nitric Oxide Synthase, Brain (251-270) antibody produced in rabbit

RRID:AB_260795

Antibody ID

AB_260795

Target Antigen

Nitric Oxide Synthase Brain (251-270) antibody produced in rabbit rat, human, rat, human

Vendor

Sigma-Aldrich

Cat Num

N7155

Proper Citation

(Sigma-Aldrich Cat# N7155, RRID:AB_260795)

Clonality

polyclonal antibody

Host Organism

rabbit

Comments

Vendor recommendations: Western Blot; Other; immunoblotting: 1:10,000

Immunocytochemical heterogeneity of somatostatin-expressing GABAergic interneurons in layers II and III of the mouse cingulate cortex: A combined immunofluorescence/design-based stereologic study.

  • Riedemann T
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2016 Aug 1

Literature context: olyclonal RRID:AB_260795 1:2000


Abstract:

Many neurological diseases including major depression and schizophrenia manifest as dysfunction of the GABAergic system within the cingulate cortex. However, relatively little is known about the properties of GABAergic interneurons in the cingulate cortex. Therefore, we investigated the neurochemical properties of GABAergic interneurons in the cingulate cortex of FVB-Tg(GadGFP)45704Swn/J mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a subset of GABAergic interneurons (GFP-expressing inhibitory interneurons [GINs]) by means of immunocytochemical and design-based stereologic techniques. We found that GINs represent around 12% of all GABAergic interneurons in the cingulate cortex. In contrast to other neocortical areas, GINs were only found in cortical layers II and III. More than 98% of GINs coexpressed the neuropeptide somatostatin (SOM), but only 50% of all SOM + neurons were GINs. By analyzing the expression of calretinin (CR), calbindin (CB), parvalbumin, and various neuropeptides, we identified several distinct GIN subgroups. In particular, we observed coexpression of SOM with CR and CB. In addition, we found neuropeptide Y expression almost exclusively in those GINs that coexpressed SOM and CR. Thus, with respect to the expression of calcium-binding proteins and neuropeptides, GINs are surprisingly heterogeneous in the mouse cingulate cortex, and the minority of GINs express only one marker protein or peptide. Furthermore, our observation of overlap between the SOM + and CR + interneuron population was in contrast to earlier findings of non-overlapping SOM + and CR + interneuron populations in the human cortex. This might indicate that findings in mouse models of neuropsychiatric diseases may not be directly transferred to human patients. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2281-2299, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Funding information:
  • NEI NIH HHS - EY 15224(United States)

Sources of input to the rostromedial tegmental nucleus, ventral tegmental area, and lateral habenula compared: A study in rat.

  • Yetnikoff L
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2015 Nov 1

Literature context: # N7155, RRID:AB_260795 21.5


Abstract:

Profound inhibitory control exerted on midbrain dopaminergic neurons by the lateral habenula (LHb), which has mainly excitatory outputs, is mediated by the GABAergic rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg), which strongly innervates dopaminergic neurons in the ventral midbrain. Early reports indicated that the afferent connections of the RMTg, excepting its very strong LHb inputs, do not differ appreciably from those of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Presumably, however, the RMTg contributes more to behavioral synthesis than to simply invert the valence of the excitatory signal coming from the LHb. Therefore, the present study was done to directly compare the inputs to the RMTg and VTA and, in deference to its substantial involvement with this circuitry, the LHb was also included in the comparison. Data indicated that, while the afferents of the RMTg, VTA, and LHb do originate within the same large pool of central nervous system (CNS) structures, each is also related to structures that project more strongly to it than to the others. The VTA gets robust input from ventral striatopallidum and extended amygdala, whereas RMTg biased inputs arise in structures with a more direct impact on motor function, such as deep layers of the contralateral superior colliculus, deep cerebellar and several brainstem nuclei, and, via a relay in the LHb, the entopeduncular nucleus. Input from the ventral pallidal-lateral preoptic-lateral hypothalamus continuum is strong in the RMTg and VTA and dominant in the LHb. Axon collateralization was also investigated, providing additional insights into the organization of the circuitry of this important triad of structures.

Funding information:
  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research - 6027(Canada)

Analysis of bipolar and amacrine populations in marmoset retina.

  • Weltzien F
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2015 Feb 1

Literature context: O, N7155; lot no. 099K4770RRID: AB_260795Rabbit polyclonal1:5,000(2.78 µg


Abstract:

About 15 parallel ganglion cell pathways transmit visual signals to the brain, but the interneuron (bipolar and amacrine) populations providing input to ganglion cells remain poorly understood in primate retina. We carried out a quantitative analysis of the inner nuclear layer in the retina of the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Vertical Vibratome sections along the horizontal meridian were processed with immunohistochemical markers. Image stacks were taken with a confocal microscope, and densities of cell populations were determined. The density of flat midget bipolar cells fell from 15,746 cells/mm(2) at 1 mm (8 deg) to 7,827 cells/mm(2) at 3 mm (25 deg). The rod bipolar cell density fell from 8,640 cells/mm(2) at 1 mm to 4,278 cells/mm(2) at 3 mm, but the ratio of the two bipolar cell types did not change with eccentricity. The amacrine cell density ranged from 30,000 cells/mm(2) at 8 deg to less than 15,000 cells/mm(2) at 25 deg, but throughout the retina, the ratio of glycinergic to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic to amacrine cells remained relatively constant. The fractions of rod bipolar, cone bipolar, amacrine, Müller, and horizontal cells of all cells in the inner nuclear layer were comparable in central and peripheral retina. Marmosets had lower proportions of midget bipolar and rod bipolar in comparison with macaque. These differences were correlated with differences in rod and cone densities between the two species and did not reflect fundamental differences in the wiring between the two species.

On lateral septum-like characteristics of outputs from the accumbal hedonic "hotspot" of Peciña and Berridge with commentary on the transitional nature of basal forebrain "boundaries".

  • Zahm DS
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2013 Jan 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Peciña and Berridge (2005; J Neurosci 25:11777-11786) observed that an injection of the μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO (D-ala(2) -N-Me-Phe(4) -Glycol(5) -enkephalin) into the rostrodorsal part of the accumbens shell (rdAcbSh) enhances expression of hedonic "liking" responses to the taste of an appetitive sucrose solution. Insofar as the connections of this hedonic "hotspot" were not singled out for special attention in the earlier neuroanatomical literature, we undertook to examine them. We observed that the patterns of inputs and outputs of the rdAcbSh are not qualitatively different from those of the rest of the Acb, except that outputs from the rdAcbSh to the lateral preoptic area and anterior and lateral hypothalamic areas are anomalously robust and overlap extensively with those of the lateral septum. We also detected reciprocal interconnections between the rdAcbSh and lateral septum. Whether and how these connections subserve hedonic impact remains to be learned, but these observations lead us to hypothesize that the rdAcbSh represents a basal forebrain transition area, in the sense that it is invaded by neurons of the lateral septum, or possibly transitional neuronal forms sharing properties of both structures. We note that the proposed transition zone between lateral septum and rdAcbSh would be but one of many in the basal forebrain and conclude by reiterating the longstanding argument that the transitional nature of such boundary areas has functional importance, of which the precise nature will remain elusive until the neurophysiological and neuropharmacological implications of such zones of transition are more generally acknowledged and better addressed.

Funding information:
  • NINDS NIH HHS - NS29709(United States)

Inputs to the midbrain dopaminergic complex in the rat, with emphasis on extended amygdala-recipient sectors.

  • Zahm DS
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2011 Nov 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

The midbrain dopaminergic neuronal groups A8, A9, A10, and A10dc occupy, respectively, the retrorubral field (RRF), substantia nigra compacta (SNc), ventral tegmental area (VTA), and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (PAGvl). Collectively, these structures give rise to a mixed dopaminergic and nondopaminergic projection system that essentially permits adaptive behavior. However, knowledge is incomplete regarding how the afferents of these structures are organized. Although the VTA is known to receive numerous afferents from cortex, basal forebrain, and brainstem and the SNc is widely perceived as receiving inputs mainly from the striatum, the afferents of the RRF and PAGvl have yet to be assessed comprehensively. This study was performed to provide an account of those connections and to seek a better understanding of how afferents might contribute to the functional interrelatedness of the VTA, SNc, RRF, and PAGvl. Ventral midbrain structures received injections of retrograde tracer, and the resulting retrogradely labeled structures were targeted with injections of anterogradely transported Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin. Whereas all injections of retrograde tracer into the VTA, SNc, RRF, or PAGvl produced labeling in many structures extending from the cortex to caudal brainstem, pronounced labeling of structures making up the central division of the extended amygdala occurred following injections that involved the RRF and PAGvl. The anterograde tracing supported this finding, and the combination of retrograde and anterograde labeling data also confirmed reports from other groups indicating that the SNc receives robust input from many of the same structures that innervate the VTA, RRF, and PAGvl.

Funding information:
  • Intramural NIH HHS - N43-ES-15477(United States)

Light responses and morphology of bNOS-immunoreactive neurons in the mouse retina.

  • Pang JJ
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2010 Jul 1

Literature context:


Abstract:

Nitric oxide (NO), produced by NO synthase (NOS), modulates the function of all retinal neurons and ocular blood vessels and participates in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. To further understand the regulation of ocular NO release, we systematically studied the morphology, topography, and light responses of NOS-containing amacrine cells (NOACs) in dark-adapted mouse retina. Immunohistological staining for neuronal NOS (bNOS), combined with retrograde labeling of ganglion cells (GCs) with Neurobiotin (NB, a gap junction permeable dye) and Lucifer yellow (LY, a less permeable dye), was used to identify NOACs. The light responses of ACs were recorded under whole-cell voltage clamp conditions and cell morphology was examined with a confocal microscope. We found that in dark-adapted conditions bNOS-immunoreactivity (IR) was present primarily in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. bNOS-IR somas were negative for LY, thus they were identified as ACs; nearly 6% of the cells were labeled by NB but not by LY, indicating that they were dye-coupled with GCs. Three morphological subtypes of NOACs (NI, NII, and displaced) were identified. The cell density, intercellular distance, and the distribution of NOACs were studied in whole retinas. Light evoked depolarizing highly sensitive ON-OFF responses in NI cells and less sensitive OFF responses in NII cells. Frequent (1-2 Hz) or abrupt change of light intensity evoked larger peak responses. The possibility for light to modify NO release from NOACs is discussed.

Funding information:
  • NCI NIH HHS - K99 CA137860(United States)

The mesopontine rostromedial tegmental nucleus: A structure targeted by the lateral habenula that projects to the ventral tegmental area of Tsai and substantia nigra compacta.

  • Jhou TC
  • J. Comp. Neurol.
  • 2009 Apr 20

Literature context:


Abstract:

Prior studies revealed that aversive stimuli and psychostimulant drugs elicit Fos expression in neurons clustered above and behind the interpeduncular nucleus that project strongly to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) compacta (C). Other reports suggest that these neurons modulate responses to aversive stimuli. We now designate the region containing them as the "mesopontine rostromedial tegmental nucleus" (RMTg) and report herein on its neuroanatomy. Dense micro-opioid receptor and somatostatin immunoreactivity characterize the RMTg, as do neurons projecting to the VTA/SNC that are enriched in GAD67 mRNA. Strong inputs to the RMTg arise in the lateral habenula (LHb) and, to a lesser extent, the SN. Other inputs come from the frontal cortex, ventral striatopallidum, extended amygdala, septum, preoptic region, lateral, paraventricular and posterior hypothalamus, zona incerta, periaqueductal gray, intermediate layers of the contralateral superior colliculus, dorsal raphe, mesencephalic, pontine and medullary reticular formation, and the following nuclei: parafascicular, supramammillary, mammillary, ventral lateral geniculate, deep mesencephalic, red, pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental, cuneiform, parabrachial, and deep cerebellar. The RMTg has meager outputs to the forebrain, mainly to the ventral pallidum, preoptic-lateral hypothalamic continuum, and midline-intralaminar thalamus, but much heavier outputs to the brainstem, including, most prominently, the VTA/SNC, as noted above, and to medial tegmentum, pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and locus ceruleus and subceruleus. The RMTg may integrate multiple forebrain and brainstem inputs in relation to a dominant LHb input. Its outputs to neuromodulatory projection systems likely converge with direct LHb projections to those structures.