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Addiction Research GPCR Assay Bank

This site describes data from and access to permanent cell lines containing beta-arrestin fluorescent protein biosensors. These cell lines can be used to create high content and low-to-high throughput assays to identify novel receptor ligands, or for studying the basic biology of the individual receptors. View our catalog of plasmids and cell lines, as well as information on how to request a product. Over forty G protein coupled receptors have been associated with addictive behaviors. The GPCR Assay Bank has collected these receptors and many of them have generated permanent cell lines containing beta-arrestin fluorescent protein biosensors. These cell lines can be used to create high content and low-to-high throughput assays to identify novel receptor ligands, or for studying the basic biology of the individual receptors. Our goal is to make the plasmids, cell lines, and data generated from them readily available to the NIDA/NIH funded research community. Thus, we hope this site will provide enabling tools that facilitate the work of the research community in understanding and combating addiction.

URL: http://www.duke.edu/web/gpcr-assay/index.html

Resource ID: nif-0000-25722     Resource Type: Resource     Version: Latest Version

Keywords

fluorescent, addiction, assay, beta-arrstin, biology, biosensor, cell, data, g protein, g-protein coupled receptor, ligand, plasmid, protein, receptor, catalog

Additional Resource Types

biomaterial supply resource, biomaterial manufacture, cell repository

Related Disease

Addiction

Resource Status

Last checked up;

Abbreviation

GPCR Assay Bank

Funding Information

NIDA,

Parent Organization

Curation Status

curated

Listed By

One Mind Biospecimen Bank Listing, Biobank

Supercategory

Resource

Original Submitter

Anonymous

Version Status

Curated

Submitted On

12:00am September 8, 2010

Originated From

SciCrunch

Changes from Previous Version

First Version

Version 1

Created 5 years ago by Anonymous