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NRSF/REST is required in vivo for repression of multiple neuronal target genes during embryogenesis.

Nature genetics | Oct 28, 1998

The neuron-restrictive silencer factor NRSF (also known as REST and XBR) can silence transcription from neuronal promoters in non-neuronal cell lines, but its function during normal development is unknown. In mice, a targeted mutation of Rest, the gene encoding NRSF, caused derepression of neuron-specific tubulin in a subset of non-neural tissues and embryonic lethality. Mosaic inhibition of NRSF in chicken embryos, using a dominant-negative form of NRSF, also caused derepression of neuronal tubulin, as well as of several other neuronal target genes, in both non-neural tissues and central nervous system neuronal progenitors. These results indicate that NRSF is required to repress neuronal gene expression in vivo, in both extra-neural and undifferentiated neural tissue.

Pubmed ID: 9771705 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Amino Acid Sequence | Animals | Chick Embryo | DNA-Binding Proteins | Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental | Mice | Molecular Sequence Data | Morphogenesis | Mosaicism | Mutation | Nervous System | Neurons | Repressor Proteins | Transcription Factors | Tubulin | Zinc Fingers

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