Preparing your results

Our searching services are busy right now. Your search will reload in five seconds.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

A role for macrophage scavenger receptors in atherosclerosis and susceptibility to infection.

Nature | Mar 20, 1997

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9069289

Macrophage type-I and type-II class-A scavenger receptors (MSR-A) are implicated in the pathological deposition of cholesterol during atherogenesis as a result of receptor-mediated uptake of modified low-density lipoproteins (mLDL). MSR-A can bind an extraordinarily wide range of ligands, including bacterial pathogens, and also mediates cation-independent macrophage adhesion in vitro. Here we show that targeted disruption of the MSR-A gene in mice results in a reduction in the size of atherosclerotic lesions in an animal deficient in apolipoprotein E. Macrophages from MSR-A-deficient mice show a marked decrease in mLDL uptake in vitro, whereas mLDL clearance from plasma occurs at a normal rate, indicating that there may be alternative mechanisms for removing mLDL from the circulation. In addition, MSR-A-knockout mice show an increased susceptibility to infection with Listeria monocytogenes or herpes simplex virus type-1, indicating that MSR-A may play a part in host defence against pathogens.

Pubmed ID: 9069289 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Animals | Apolipoproteins E | Arteriosclerosis | Cell Adhesion | Disease Susceptibility | Gene Targeting | Herpes Simplex | Lipoproteins, LDL | Listeriosis | Liver | Macrophages, Peritoneal | Mice | Mice, Inbred C57BL | Mice, Knockout | Receptors, Immunologic | Receptors, Scavenger | Scavenger Receptors, Class A | Spleen

Research resources used in this publication

None found

Research tools detected in this publication

None found

Data used in this publication

None found

Associated grants

None

Publication data is provided by the National Library of Medicine ® and PubMed ®. Data is retrieved from PubMed ® on a weekly schedule. For terms and conditions see the National Library of Medicine Terms and Conditions.