Searching across hundreds of databases

Our searching services are busy right now. Your search will reload in five seconds.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

A mouse model for the delta F508 allele of cystic fibrosis.

The most common cause of cystic fibrosis is a mutation that deletes phenylalanine 508 in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The delta F508 protein is misprocessed and degraded rather than traveling to the apical membrane. We used a novel strategy to introduce the delta F508 mutation into the mouse CFTR gene. Affected epithelia from homozygous delta F508 mice lacked CFTR in the apical membrane and were Cl-impermeable. These abnormalities are the same as those observed in patients with delta F508 and suggest that these mice have the same cellular defect. 40% of homozygous delta F508 animals survived into adulthood and displayed several abnormalities found in human disease and in CFTR null mice. These animals should provide an excellent model to investigate pathogenesis and to examine therapies directed at correcting the delta F508 defect.

Pubmed ID: 7560099 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Alleles | Animals | Base Sequence | Cystic Fibrosis | Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator | Digestive System | Disease Models, Animal | Electrolytes | Humans | Mice | Mice, Inbred C57BL | Molecular Sequence Data | Mutation | Pancreatic Ducts | RNA, Messenger

Research resources used in this publication

None found

Research tools detected in this publication

None found

Data used in this publication

None found

Associated grants

None

Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (Data, Disease Annotation)

Publication data is provided by the National Library of Medicine ® and PubMed ®. Data is retrieved from PubMed ® on a weekly schedule. For terms and conditions see the National Library of Medicine Terms and Conditions.

We have not found any resources mentioned in this publication.