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Mouse models of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases differ in neurologic phenotype and ganglioside metabolism.

Nature genetics | Oct 2, 1995

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7550345

Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases are clinically similar neurodegenerative disorders. These two sphingolipidoses are characterized by a heritable absence of beta-hexosaminidase A resulting in defective GM2 ganglioside degradation. Through disruption of the Hexa and Hexb genes in embryonic stem cells, we have established mouse models corresponding to each disease. Unlike the two human disorders, the two mouse models show very different neurologic phenotypes. Although exhibiting biochemical and pathologic features of the disease, the Tay-Sachs model showed no neurological abnormalities. In contrast, the Sandhoff model was severely affected. The phenotypic difference between the two mouse models is the result of differences in the ganglioside degradation pathway between mice and humans.

Pubmed ID: 7550345 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Animals | Brain | Carbohydrate Sequence | Disease Models, Animal | Gangliosides | Hexosaminidase A | Hexosaminidase B | Humans | Mice | Mice, Mutant Strains | Molecular Sequence Data | Neurons | Phenotype | Restriction Mapping | Sandhoff Disease | Spinal Cord | Stem Cells | Tay-Sachs Disease | beta-N-Acetylhexosaminidases

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Associated grants

  • Agency: NICHD NIH HHS, Id: HD03110
  • Agency: NINDS NIH HHS, Id: NS24453

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