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Control of Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity by AKAP-Anchored Kinase and Phosphatase Regulation of Ca2+-Permeable AMPA Receptors.

Neuronal information processing requires multiple forms of synaptic plasticity mediated by NMDARs and AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). These plasticity mechanisms include long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), which are Hebbian, homosynaptic mechanisms locally regulating synaptic strength of specific inputs, and homeostatic synaptic scaling, which is a heterosynaptic mechanism globally regulating synaptic strength across all inputs. In many cases, LTP and homeostatic scaling regulate AMPAR subunit composition to increase synaptic strength via incorporation of Ca2+-permeable receptors (CP-AMPAR) containing GluA1, but lacking GluA2, subunits. Previous work by our group and others demonstrated that anchoring of the kinase PKA and the phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) to A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 150 play opposing roles in regulation of GluA1 Ser845 phosphorylation and CP-AMPAR synaptic incorporation during hippocampal LTP and LTD. Here, using both male and female knock-in mice that are deficient in PKA or CaN anchoring, we show that AKAP150-anchored PKA and CaN also play novel roles in controlling CP-AMPAR synaptic incorporation during homeostatic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. We found that genetic disruption of AKAP-PKA anchoring prevented increases in Ser845 phosphorylation and CP-AMPAR synaptic recruitment during rapid homeostatic synaptic scaling-up induced by combined blockade of action potential firing and NMDAR activity. In contrast, genetic disruption of AKAP-CaN anchoring resulted in basal increases in Ser845 phosphorylation and CP-AMPAR synaptic activity that blocked subsequent scaling-up by preventing additional CP-AMPAR recruitment. Thus, the balanced, opposing phospho-regulation provided by AKAP-anchored PKA and CaN is essential for control of both Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity mechanisms that require CP-AMPARs.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal circuit function is shaped by multiple forms of activity-dependent plasticity that control excitatory synaptic strength, including LTP/LTD that adjusts strength of individual synapses and homeostatic plasticity that adjusts overall strength of all synapses. Mechanisms controlling LTP/LTD and homeostatic plasticity were originally thought to be distinct; however, recent studies suggest that CP-AMPAR phosphorylation regulation is important during both LTP/LTD and homeostatic plasticity. Here we show that CP-AMPAR regulation by the kinase PKA and phosphatase CaN coanchored to the scaffold protein AKAP150, a mechanism previously implicated in LTP/LTD, is also crucial for controlling synaptic strength during homeostatic plasticity. These novel findings significantly expand our understanding of homeostatic plasticity mechanisms and further emphasize how intertwined they are with LTP and LTD.

Pubmed ID: 29440558 RIS Download

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