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A translational approach to capture gait signatures of neurological disorders in mice and humans.

Scientific reports | Jun 12, 2017

A method for capturing gait signatures in neurological conditions that allows comparison of human gait with animal models would be of great value in translational research. However, the velocity dependence of gait parameters and differences between quadruped and biped gait have made this comparison challenging. Here we present an approach that accounts for changes in velocity during walking and allows for translation across species. In mice, we represented spatial and temporal gait parameters as a function of velocity and established regression models that reproducibly capture the signatures of these relationships during walking. In experimental parkinsonism models, regression curves representing these relationships shifted from baseline, implicating changes in gait signatures, but with marked differences between models. Gait parameters in healthy human subjects followed similar strict velocity dependent relationships which were altered in Parkinson's patients in ways that resemble some but not all mouse models. This novel approach is suitable to quantify qualitative walking abnormalities related to CNS circuit dysfunction across species, identify appropriate animal models, and it provides important translational opportunities.

Pubmed ID: 28607434 RIS Download

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ClinicalTrials.gov

A registry and results database of federally and privately supported clinical trials conducted in the United States and around the world. It provides information about the purpose of a trial, who may participate, locations, and phone numbers for more details. This information should be used in conjunction with advice from health care professionals. ClinicalTrials.gov offers up-to-date information for locating federally and privately supported clinical trials for a wide range of diseases and conditions. A clinical trial (also clinical research) is a research study in human volunteers to answer specific health questions. Interventional trials determine whether experimental treatments or new ways of using known therapies are safe and effective under controlled environments. Observational trials address health issues in large groups of people or populations in natural settings. ClinicalTrials.gov currently contains 116,043 trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, other federal agencies, and private industry. Studies listed in the database are conducted in all 50 States and in 178 countries.

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Journal of Comparative Neurology Antibody database

The JCN antibody database is a listing of all antibodies used in JCN papers from 2006 onward. The catalog numbers and vendor information is included for all antibodies listed, and with a new collaboration with NIF''''s AntibodyRegistry, a unique identifier is also listed for each antibody. The Journal of Comparative Neurology requires rigorous characterization for all antibodies that are used in JCN papers. The antibodies in the The Journal of Comparative Neurology antibody database have in nearly all cases been described and characterized adequately according to the provided guidelines. This information can be used to identify a particular target immunohistochemically or to design an experiment using the antibody information. If you are looking for an antibody to identify a particular target immunohistochemically, this list is a good place to begin your search. We suggest you then look up the paper in which the antibody was used, to make sure that it will meet your needs and to verify its characterization. (The characterization of antibodies in JCN papers often goes well beyond the material published by the manufacturer, so that examining this information before you order an antibody can be very useful.) While we do not guarantee that these antibodies will identify only the intended target (that is a function of the actual experiment and controls), this is the most carefully verified list of antibodies that we are aware of, and we wanted to share this resource with our readers and authors.

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Fiji

Software package as distribution of ImageJ and ImageJ2 together with Java, Java3D and plugins organized into coherent menu structure. Used to assist research in life sciences.

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