Searching across hundreds of databases

Our searching services are busy right now. Your search will reload in five seconds.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

Global expression profiling of globose basal cells and neurogenic progression within the olfactory epithelium.

Ongoing, lifelong neurogenesis maintains the neuronal population of the olfactory epithelium in the face of piecemeal neuronal turnover and restores it following wholesale loss. The molecular phenotypes corresponding to different stages along the progression from multipotent globose basal cell (GBC) progenitor to differentiated olfactory sensory neuron are poorly characterized. We used the transgenic expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and cell surface markers to FACS-isolate ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs, Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs and immature neurons, and ΔOMP-eGFP(+) mature neurons from normal adult mice. In addition, the latter two populations were also collected 3 weeks after olfactory bulb ablation, a lesion that results in persistently elevated neurogenesis. Global profiling of mRNA from the populations indicates that all stages of neurogenesis share a cohort of >2,100 genes that are upregulated compared to sustentacular cells. A further cohort of >1,200 genes are specifically upregulated in GBCs as compared to sustentacular cells and differentiated neurons. The increased rate of neurogenesis caused by olfactory bulbectomy had little effect on the transcriptional profile of the Neurog1-eGFP(+) population. In contrast, the abbreviated lifespan of ΔOMP-eGFP(+) neurons born in the absence of the bulb correlated with substantial differences in gene expression as compared to the mature neurons of the normal epithelium. Detailed examination of the specific genes upregulated in the different progenitor populations revealed that the chromatin modifying complex proteins LSD1 and coREST were expressed sequentially in upstream ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs and Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs/immature neurons. The expression patterns of these proteins are dynamically regulated after activation of the epithelium by methyl bromide lesion.

Pubmed ID: 22847514 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Animals | Cell Differentiation | Flow Cytometry | Gene Expression Profiling | Immunohistochemistry | Male | Mice | Mice, Transgenic | Neural Stem Cells | Neurogenesis | Olfactory Mucosa | Olfactory Receptor Neurons | Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis | RNA, Messenger

Antibody Registry (Reagent, Antibodies)

Publication data is provided by the National Library of Medicine ® and PubMed ®. Data is retrieved from PubMed ® on a weekly schedule. For terms and conditions see the National Library of Medicine Terms and Conditions.

This is a list of tools and resources that we have found mentioned in this publication.


Covance

A contract research organization providing drug development and animal testing services. Under the name Covance Research Products Inc., based in Denver, Pennsylvania, the company also deals in the import, breeding and sale of laboratory animals. It breeds dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs, non-human primates, and pigs, and runs the largest non-human primate laboratory in Germany. (Wikipedia)

tool

View all literature mentions

GenePattern

A powerful genomic analysis platform that provides access to hundreds of tools for gene expression analysis, proteomics, SNP analysis, flow cytometry, RNA-seq analysis, and common data processing tasks. A web-based interface provides easy access to these tools and allows the creation of multi-step analysis pipelines that enable reproducible in silico research.

tool

View all literature mentions

PANTHER

Classification system that classifies genes by their functions, using published scientific experimental evidence and evolutionary relationships to predict function even in the absence of direct experimental evidence. Proteins are classified by expert biologists according to: * Gene families and subfamilies, including annotated phylogenetic trees * Gene Ontology classes: molecular function, biological process, cellular component * PANTHER Protein Classes * Pathways, including diagrams The PANTHER Classifications are the result of human curation as well as sophisticated bioinformatics algorithms. Details of the methods can be found in (Thomas et al., Genome Research 2003; Mi et al. NAR 2005). Version 8.1 contains 7729 protein families, each with a phylogenetic tree relating modern-day genes in 48 organisms.) PANTHER contains the complete sets of protein coding genes for 48 organisms, obtained from definitive sources. PANTHER uses the Gene Ontology for classifications by molecular function, biological process and cellular component. The PANTHER Protein Class ontology was adapted from the PANTHER/X molecular function ontology, and includes commonly used classes of protein functions, many of which are not covered by GO molecular function. You may download the classes and relationship information. PANTHER uses only a subset of GO terms (GO slim) to facilitate browsing. You may download the PANTHER GO slim. You may Score proteins against the PANTHER HMM library and download PANTHER tools and data. PANTHER Pathway consists of over 176, primarily signaling, pathways, each with subfamilies and protein sequences mapped to individual pathway components. Pathways are drawn using CellDesigner software, capturing molecular level events in both signaling and metabolic pathways, and can be exported in SBML format. The SBGN view of the diagram can also be exported. Pathway diagrams are interactive and include tools for visualizing gene expression data in the context of the diagrams.

tool

View all literature mentions

Wako

An Antibody supplier

tool

View all literature mentions