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Mood-state effects on amygdala volume in bipolar disorder.

BACKGROUND: Prior structural neuroimaging studies of the amygdala in patients with bipolar disorder have reported higher or lower volumes, or no difference relative to healthy controls. These inconsistent findings may have resulted from combining subjects in different mood states. The prefrontal cortex has recently been reported to have a lower volume in depressed versus euthymic bipolar patients. Here we examined whether similar mood state-dependent volumetric differences are detectable in the amygdala. METHODS: Forty subjects, including 28 with bipolar disorder type I (12 depressed and 16 euthymic), and 12 healthy comparison subjects were scanned on a 3T magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanner. Amygdala volumes were manually traced and compared across subject groups, adjusting for sex and total brain volume. RESULTS: Statistical analyses found a significant effect of mood state and hemisphere on amygdala volume. Subsequent comparisons revealed that amygdala volumes were significantly lower in the depressed bipolar group compared to both the euthymic bipolar (p=0.005) and healthy control (p=0.043) groups. LIMITATIONS: Our study was cross-sectional and some patients were medicated. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that mood state influences amygdala volume in subjects with bipolar disorder. Future studies that replicate these findings in unmedicated patient samples scanned longitudinally are needed.

Pubmed ID: 22521854

Authors

  • Foland-Ross LC
  • Brooks JO
  • Mintz J
  • Bartzokis G
  • Townsend J
  • Thompson PM
  • Altshuler LL

Journal

Journal of affective disorders

Publication Data

August 11, 2012

Associated Grants

  • Agency: NIA NIH HHS, Id: AG016570
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: C06 RR012169-01
  • Agency: NIBIB NIH HHS, Id: EB001561
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: F31 MH078556
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: F31 MH078556-03
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: K24 MH001848
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: K24 MH001848-05
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: M01 RR000865-26
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: MH001848
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: MH075944
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: MH078556
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: P41 RR013642
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: P41 RR013642-12
  • Agency: NIA NIH HHS, Id: P50 AG016570
  • Agency: NIA NIH HHS, Id: P50 AG016570-09
  • Agency: NIBIB NIH HHS, Id: R21 EB001561
  • Agency: NIBIB NIH HHS, Id: R21 EB001561-03
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: R21 MH075944
  • Agency: NIMH NIH HHS, Id: R21 MH075944-02
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: R21 RR019771
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: R21 RR019771-02
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: RR000865
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: RR012169
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: RR013642
  • Agency: NCRR NIH HHS, Id: RR019771

Mesh Terms

  • Adult
  • Affect
  • Amygdala
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Depression
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Organ Size