Searching across hundreds of databases

Our searching services are busy right now. Your search will reload in five seconds.

X
Forgot Password

If you have forgotten your password you can enter your email here and get a temporary password sent to your email.

The cognitive atlas: toward a knowledge foundation for cognitive neuroscience.

Cognitive neuroscience aims to map mental processes onto brain function, which begs the question of what "mental processes" exist and how they relate to the tasks that are used to manipulate and measure them. This topic has been addressed informally in prior work, but we propose that cumulative progress in cognitive neuroscience requires a more systematic approach to representing the mental entities that are being mapped to brain function and the tasks used to manipulate and measure mental processes. We describe a new open collaborative project that aims to provide a knowledge base for cognitive neuroscience, called the Cognitive Atlas (accessible online at http://www.cognitiveatlas.org), and outline how this project has the potential to drive novel discoveries about both mind and brain.

Pubmed ID: 21922006 RIS Download

Publication data is provided by the National Library of Medicine ® and PubMed ®. Data is retrieved from PubMed ® on a weekly schedule. For terms and conditions see the National Library of Medicine Terms and Conditions.

This is a list of tools and resources that we have found mentioned in this publication.


Cognitive Paradigm Ontology

Ontology used to describe the experimental conditions within cognitive and behavioral experiments, primarily in humans for application and use in the functional neuroimaging community. CogPO has been developed through the integration of the Functional Imaging Biomedical Informatics Research Network (FBIRN) Human Imaging Database (HID) and the BrainMap Database. The design of CogPO concentrates on what can be observed directly: categorization of each paradigm in terms of (1) the stimulus presented to the subjects, (2) the requested instructions, and (3) the returned response.

tool

View all literature mentions

GitHub

A web-based hosting service for software development projects that use the Git revision control system offering powerful collaboration, code review, and code management. It offers both paid plans for private repositories, and free accounts for open source projects. Large or small, every repository comes with the same powerful tools. These tools are open to the community for public projects and secure for private projects. Features include: * Integrated issue tracking * Collaborative code review * Easily manage teams within organizations * Text entry with understated power * A growing list of programming languages and data formats * On the desktop and in your pocket - Android app and mobile web views let you keep track of your projects on the go.

tool

View all literature mentions

BioPortal

Open repository of biomedical ontologies that provides access via Web browsers and Web services to ontologies. It supports ontologies in OBO format, OWL, RDF, Rich Release Format (RRF), Protege frames, and LexGrid XML. Functionality includes the ability to browse, search and visualize ontologies as well as to comment on, and create mappings for ontologies. Any registered user can submit an ontology. The NCBO Annotator and NCBO Resource Index can also be accessed via BioPortal. Additional features: * Add Reviews: rate the ontology according to several criteria and describe your experience using the ontology. * Add Mappings: submit point-to-point mappings or upload bulk mappings created with external tools. Notification of new Mappings is RSS-enabled and Mappings can be browsed via BioPortal and accessed via Web services. * NCBO Annotator: Tool that tags free text with ontology terms. NCBO uses the Annotator to generate ontology annotations, creating an ontology index of these resources accessible via the NCBO Resource Index. The Annotator can be accessed through BioPortal or directly as a Web service. The annotation workflow is based on syntactic concept recognition (using the preferred name and synonyms for terms) and on a set of semantic expansion algorithms that leverage the ontology structure (e.g., is_a relations). * NCBO Resource Index: The NCBO Resource Index is a system for ontology based annotation and indexing of biomedical data; the key functionality of this system is to enable users to locate biomedical data linked via ontology terms. A set of annotations is generated automatically, using the NCBO Annotator, and presented in BioPortal. This service uses a concept recognizer (developed by the National Center for Integrative Biomedical Informatics, University of Michigan) to produce a set of annotations and expand them using ontology is_a relations. * Web services: Documentation on all Web services and example code is available at: BioPortal Web services.

tool

View all literature mentions

Cognitive Atlas

Knowledge base (or ontology) that characterizes the state of current thought in cognitive science that captures knowledge from users with expertise in psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience. There are two basic kinds of knowledge in the knowledge base. Terms provide definitions and properties for individual concepts and tasks. Assertions describe relations between terms in the same way that a sentence describes relations between parts of speech. The goal is to develop a knowledge base that will support annotation of data in databases, as well as supporting improved discourse in the community. It is open to all interested researchers. A fundamental feature of the knowledge base is the desire and ability to capture not just agreement but also disagreement regarding definitions and assertions. Thus, if you see a definition or assertion that you disagree with, then you can assert and describe your disagreement. The project is led by Russell Poldrack, Professor of Psychology and Neurobiology at the University of Texas at Austin in collaboration with the UCLA Center for Computational Biology (A. Toga, PI) and UCLA Consortium for Neuropsychiatric Phenomics (R. Bilder, PI). Most tasks used in cognitive psychology research are not identical across different laboratories or even within the same laboratory over time. A major advantage of anchoring cognitive ontologies to the measurement level is that the strategy for determining changes in task properties is easier than tracking changes in concept definitions and usage. The process is easier because task parameters are usually (if not always) operationalized objectively, offering a clear basis to judge divergence in methods. The process is also easier because most tasks are based on prior tasks, and thus can more readily be considered descendants in a phylogenetic sense.

tool

View all literature mentions

GO

A community-based bioinformatics resource consisting of three structured controlled vocabularies (ontologies) for the annotation of gene products with respect to their molecular function, cellular component, and biological role in a species-independent manner. This initiative to standardize the representation of gene and gene product attributes across species and databases is an effort to address the need for consistent descriptions of gene products in different databases. The Gene Ontology project encourages input from the community into both the content of the GO and annotation using GO. There are three separate aspects to this effort: first, they write and maintain the ontologies themselves; second, they make cross-links between the ontologies and the genes and gene products in the collaborating databases; and third, they develop tools that facilitate the creation, maintenance and use of ontologies. The controlled vocabularies are structured so that users can query them at different levels: for example, uers can use GO to find all the gene products in the mouse genome that are involved in signal transduction, or users can zoom in on all the receptor tyrosine kinases. This structure also allows annotators to assign properties to gene products at different levels, depending on how much is known about a gene product.

tool

View all literature mentions

PubBrain

A literature search and visualization tool that allows end users to enter any PubMed query and see that query rendered as a heatmap illustrating which regions of interest are most commonly mentioned within the search results. To use PubBrain, simply enter any valid PubMed search in the search box.

tool

View all literature mentions