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Co-occurring amphetamine use and associated medical and psychiatric comorbidity among opioid-dependent adults: results from the Clinical Trials Network.

BACKGROUND: In response to the rising rate of treatment admissions related to illicit use of amphetamines (eg, methamphetamine), we examined the prevalence of amphetamine use among treatment-seeking, opioid-dependent adults, explored whether amphetamine users were as likely as nonamphetamine users to enroll in opioid-dependence treatment trials, and determined whether amphetamine users manifested greater levels of medical and psychiatric comorbidity than nonusers. METHODS: The sample included 1257 opioid-dependent adults screened for participation in three-multisite studies of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN001-003), which studied the effectiveness of buprenorphine for opioid detoxification under varying treatment conditions. Patients were recruited from 23 addiction treatment programs across the US. Medical and psychiatric comorbidity were examined by past-month amphetamine use (current vs former) and route of administration. Five mutually exclusive groups were examined, ie, nonusers, current amphetamine injectors, current amphetamine noninjectors, former amphetamine injectors, and former amphetamine noninjectors. RESULTS: Of the sample (n = 1257), 22.3% had a history of regular amphetamine use. Of the 280 amphetamine users, 30.3% reported injection as their primary route. Amphetamine users were more likely than nonusers to be white and use more substances. Amphetamine users were as likely as non-users to enroll in treatment trials. Bivariate analyses indicated elevated rates of psychiatric problems (depression, anxiety, hallucinations, cognitive impairment, violence, suicidal thoughts/attempts) and medical illnesses (dermatological, hepatic, cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, seizure, allergy conditions) among amphetamine users. After adjusting for demographic variables and lifetime use of other substances: current amphetamine users and former injectors showed an increased likelihood of having medical illnesses and hospitalizations; current injectors had elevated odds of suicidal thoughts or attempts; current noninjectors exhibited elevated odds of anxiety, cognitive impairment, and violent behaviors; and former noninjectors had increased odds of depression. CONCLUSION: Treatment-seeking, amphetamine-using, opioid-dependent adults manifest greater levels of medical and psychiatric morbidity than treatment-seeking, opioid-dependent adults who have not used amphetamines, indicating a greater need for intensive clinical management.

Pubmed ID: 21886430 RIS Download

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Associated grants

  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R33 DA027503-02
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: K05 DA017009
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R21 DA027503
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: K05 DA017009-10
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R33 DA027503
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: U10 DA013045-12
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: U10 DA013043-12
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R01 DA019623-03
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: HHSN271200522071C
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R21 DA027503-01
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R01 DA019623-04
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R01 DA019901-03
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R01 DA019623
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: U10 DA013043
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: U10 DA013045
  • Agency: NIDA NIH HHS, Id: R01 DA019901

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