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Sleep and synaptic homeostasis: structural evidence in Drosophila.

The functions of sleep remain elusive, but a strong link exists between sleep need and neuronal plasticity. We tested the hypothesis that plastic processes during wake lead to a net increase in synaptic strength and sleep is necessary for synaptic renormalization. We found that, in three Drosophila neuronal circuits, synapse size or number increases after a few hours of wake and decreases only if flies are allowed to sleep. A richer wake experience resulted in both larger synaptic growth and greater sleep need. Finally, we demonstrate that the gene Fmr1 (fragile X mental retardation 1) plays an important role in sleep-dependent synaptic renormalization.

Pubmed ID: 21700878

Authors

  • Bushey D
  • Tononi G
  • Cirelli C

Journal

Science (New York, N.Y.)

Publication Data

June 24, 2011

Associated Grants

  • Agency: NIH HHS, Id: DP1 OD000579
  • Agency: NIH HHS, Id: DP1 OD000579-05
  • Agency: NIGMS NIH HHS, Id: R01 GM075315
  • Agency: NIGMS NIH HHS, Id: R01 GM075315
  • Agency: NIGMS NIH HHS, Id: R01 GM075315-01A2
  • Agency: NIGMS NIH HHS, Id: R01 GM075315-02
  • Agency: NIGMS NIH HHS, Id: R01 GM075315-03
  • Agency: NIGMS NIH HHS, Id: R01 GM075315-04
  • Agency: NIGMS NIH HHS, Id: R01 GM075315-05
  • Agency: NIGMS NIH HHS, Id: R01 GM075315-05S1
  • Agency: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Id:

Mesh Terms

  • Animals
  • Dendrites
  • Drosophila Proteins
  • Drosophila melanogaster
  • Female
  • Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein
  • Homeostasis
  • Male
  • Mushroom Bodies
  • Neuronal Plasticity
  • Neurons
  • Neuropeptides
  • Sleep
  • Sleep Deprivation
  • Synapses
  • Time Factors