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Interaction of childhood stress with hippocampus and prefrontal cortex volume reduction in major depression.

Early emotional stress is associated with a life-long burden of risk for later depression and stressful life events contribute to the development of depressive episodes. In this study we investigated whether childhood stress is associated with structural brain alterations in patients with major depression (MD). Forty-three patients with MD and 44 age as well as gender matched healthy control subjects were investigated using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Region of interest analysis of the hippocampus, whole brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and assessment of childhood stress was carried out. Significantly smaller hippocampal white matter and prefrontal gray matter volume was observed in patients with MD compared to healthy controls. In particular left hippocampal white matter was smaller in patients, who had emotional childhood neglect, compared to those without neglect. For male patients this effect was seen in the left and right hippocampus. Moreover, physical neglect during childhood affected prefrontal gray matter volume in healthy subjects. Both emotional neglect and brain structural abnormalities predicted cumulative illness duration and there was a significant interaction between emotional neglect and prefrontal volumes as well as hippocampal white matter on the illness course. Childhood neglect resulted in hippocampal white matter changes in patients with major depression, pronounced at the left side and in males. Most interestingly, childhood stress and brain structure volumes independently predicted cumulative illness course. Subjects with both, structural brain changes and childhood emotional neglect seem to be at a very high risk to develop a more severe illness course.

Pubmed ID: 20122698

Authors

  • Frodl T
  • Reinhold E
  • Koutsouleris N
  • Reiser M
  • Meisenzahl EM

Journal

Journal of psychiatric research

Publication Data

October 6, 2010

Associated Grants

None

Mesh Terms

  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Case-Control Studies
  • Child
  • Child Abuse
  • Depressive Disorder, Major
  • Female
  • Functional Laterality
  • Hippocampus
  • Humans
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prefrontal Cortex
  • Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
  • Risk Factors
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Stress, Psychological
  • Time Factors