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Regulation of slow and fast muscle myofibrillogenesis by Wnt/beta-catenin and myostatin signaling.

PloS one | Jun 11, 2009

Deviation from proper muscle development or homeostasis results in various myopathic conditions. Employing genetic as well as chemical intervention, we provide evidence that a tight regulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is essential for muscle fiber growth and maintenance. In zebrafish embryos, gain-of-Wnt/beta-catenin function results in unscheduled muscle progenitor proliferation, leading to slow and fast muscle hypertrophy accompanied by fast muscle degeneration. The effects of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling on fast muscle hypertrophy were rescued by misexpression of Myostatin or p21(CIP/WAF), establishing an in vivo regulation of myofibrillogenesis by Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and Myostatin. Epistatic analyses suggest a possible genetic interaction between Wnt/beta-catenin and Myostatin in regulation of slow and fast twitch muscle myofibrillogenesis.

Pubmed ID: 19517013 RIS Download

Mesh terms: Animals | Cell Proliferation | Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21 | Epistasis, Genetic | Gene Expression Regulation | Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental | Hypertrophy | Muscle Fibers, Fast-Twitch | Muscle Fibers, Slow-Twitch | Muscles | Myostatin | Signal Transduction | Wnt Proteins | Zebrafish | beta Catenin

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ZFIN (Data, Gene Expression)

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